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Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

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  • Garybt3
    A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots. Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce
    Message 1 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
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      A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.

      Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.

      If not, you need to make adjustments.
      A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.

      If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.

      Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.

      If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.

      If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.

      Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P

      I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)
      Gary
    • Larry Hollenberg
      Gary, I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee.  Since I started using the
      Message 2 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
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        Gary,
        I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee.  Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I  am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot.  Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create.  I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies.  The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam.  Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.  
        If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
        Larry

        --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@...> wrote:

        From: Garybt3 <garybt3@...>
        Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM













         





        A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.



        Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.



        If not, you need to make adjustments.

        A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.



        If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.



        Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.



        If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.



        If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.



        Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P



        I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)

        Gary




































        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • rsburritt@gmail.com
        Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side. Since I have an electric
        Message 3 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.
          Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.

          Roland

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Larry Hollenberg
          To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
          Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon


          Gary,
          I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
          If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
          Larry

          --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@...> wrote:

          From: Garybt3 <garybt3@...>
          Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
          To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM



          A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.

          Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.

          If not, you need to make adjustments.

          A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.

          If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.

          Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.

          If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.

          If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.

          Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P

          I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)

          Gary















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • pb_petty
          Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster
          Message 4 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.

            Philip

            --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
            >
            > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.
            > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.
            >
            > Roland
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Larry Hollenberg
            > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
            > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
            >
            >
            > Gary,
            > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
            > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
            > Larry
            >
            > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@...> wrote:
            >
            > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@...>
            > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
            > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM
            >
            >
            >
            > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.
            >
            > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.
            >
            > If not, you need to make adjustments.
            >
            > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.
            >
            > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.
            >
            > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.
            >
            > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.
            >
            > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.
            >
            > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P
            >
            > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)
            >
            > Gary
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • rsburritt@gmail.com
            Magnets don t stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it s ferrous, it won t work on induction
            Message 5 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
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              Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.

              Roland

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: pb_petty
              To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM
              Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon


              Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.

              Philip

              --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
              >
              > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.
              > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.
              >
              > Roland
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Larry Hollenberg
              > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
              > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
              >
              >
              > Gary,
              > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
              > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
              > Larry
              >
              > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@...> wrote:
              >
              > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@...>
              > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
              > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM
              >
              >
              >
              > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.
              >
              > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.
              >
              > If not, you need to make adjustments.
              >
              > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.
              >
              > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.
              >
              > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.
              >
              > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.
              >
              > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.
              >
              > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P
              >
              > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)
              >
              > Gary
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • rsburritt@gmail.com
              Larry I have an old Variac packed away somewhere I wish I could find it because I want to experiment with it on some of those old stoves, but I bet that would
              Message 6 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Larry I have an old Variac packed away somewhere I wish I could find it because I want to experiment with it on some of those old stoves, but I bet that would help. Also with the Cory automatics. A Variac is expensive...luckily I was given mine by my father who found it in an old building he bought that used to belong to a radio/tv repairman.

                Roland


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Larry Hollenberg
                To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
                Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon


                Gary,
                I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
                If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
                Larry

                --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@...> wrote:

                From: Garybt3 <garybt3@...>
                Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM



                A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.

                Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.

                If not, you need to make adjustments.

                A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.

                If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.

                Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.

                If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.

                If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.

                Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P

                I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)

                Gary















                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • pb_petty
                Roland, You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters
                Message 7 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  Roland,

                  You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters when a friend using copper pots used one on his induction hob. I cook with vintage copper pieces almost exclusively.

                  Philip

                  --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.
                  >
                  > Roland
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: pb_petty
                  > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM
                  > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                  >
                  >
                  > Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.
                  >
                  > Philip
                  >
                  > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.
                  > > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.
                  > >
                  > > Roland
                  > >
                  > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > From: Larry Hollenberg
                  > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                  > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
                  > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Gary,
                  > > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
                  > > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
                  > > Larry
                  > >
                  > > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@>
                  > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                  > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                  > > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.
                  > >
                  > > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.
                  > >
                  > > If not, you need to make adjustments.
                  > >
                  > > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.
                  > >
                  > > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.
                  > >
                  > > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.
                  > >
                  > > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.
                  > >
                  > > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.
                  > >
                  > > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P
                  > >
                  > > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)
                  > >
                  > > Gary
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • rsburritt@gmail.com
                  Philip, I m kind of leery to use an adapter with my induction standalone burner...doesn t it shorten the life of it? I m actually content to use Cory
                  Message 8 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Philip, I'm kind of leery to use an adapter with my induction standalone burner...doesn't it shorten the life of it?
                    I'm actually content to use Cory automatics with a glass upper, or a Nicro lower with glass upper on my electric stove (used to have gas and miss it)...or, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes I use the butane burner with a glass lower/upper if I want variety.

                    And, I haven't retired my french pressese either. Those are for lazy days...which actually is happening frequently lately. LOL


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: pb_petty
                    To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:08 PM
                    Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon


                    Roland,

                    You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters when a friend using copper pots used one on his induction hob. I cook with vintage copper pieces almost exclusively.

                    Philip

                    --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.
                    >
                    > Roland
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: pb_petty
                    > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM
                    > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                    >
                    >
                    > Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.
                    >
                    > Philip
                    >
                    > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.
                    > > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.
                    > >
                    > > Roland
                    > >
                    > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > From: Larry Hollenberg
                    > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
                    > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Gary,
                    > > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
                    > > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
                    > > Larry
                    > >
                    > > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@>
                    > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                    > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.
                    > >
                    > > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.
                    > >
                    > > If not, you need to make adjustments.
                    > >
                    > > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.
                    > >
                    > > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.
                    > >
                    > > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.
                    > >
                    > > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.
                    > >
                    > > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.
                    > >
                    > > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P
                    > >
                    > > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)
                    > >
                    > > Gary
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • pb_petty
                    Roland, I have no idea if the adapters for the induction hobs shorten their life. I certainly hope not, but it would be prudent to be careful as always. One
                    Message 9 of 28 , Oct 2, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Roland,

                      I have no idea if the adapters for the induction hobs shorten their life. I certainly hope not, but it would be prudent to be careful as always.

                      One variable that we should not overlook in the discussion of the speed of heating water and how vigorous a "boil" is created in the top is the size of the gap between the end of the stem and the bottom of the base.

                      All things being equal I have found that the smaller the gap is, the more vigorous and turbulent the "boil" without burning the brew. Many vintage glass pots with cylindrical stems leave a greater gap for safety reasons than my modern Yama 8-cup. These vintage pots (glass) benefit somewhat I believe by some stirring during the boil whereas I find I do not need to stir my Yama to get the same results.

                      The shape of the stem, conical, flared etc. is a whole other subject to deal with. Then there is the issue of thermal conductivity and thermal cycling of metal vs. glass (for the base), etc. All these variables and more have been hit on in previous discussion threads, but I think it is beneficial to review the subjects periodically for newer members and to see if anyone has made any discoveries in technique(s) that we can all learn from.

                      Philip


                      --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Philip, I'm kind of leery to use an adapter with my induction standalone burner...doesn't it shorten the life of it?
                      > I'm actually content to use Cory automatics with a glass upper, or a Nicro lower with glass upper on my electric stove (used to have gas and miss it)...or, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes I use the butane burner with a glass lower/upper if I want variety.
                      >
                      > And, I haven't retired my french pressese either. Those are for lazy days...which actually is happening frequently lately. LOL
                      >
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: pb_petty
                      > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:08 PM
                      > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                      >
                      >
                      > Roland,
                      >
                      > You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters when a friend using copper pots used one on his induction hob. I cook with vintage copper pieces almost exclusively.
                      >
                      > Philip
                      >
                      > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.
                      > >
                      > > Roland
                      > >
                      > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > From: pb_petty
                      > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM
                      > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.
                      > >
                      > > Philip
                      > >
                      > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.
                      > > > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.
                      > > >
                      > > > Roland
                      > > >
                      > > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > > From: Larry Hollenberg
                      > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                      > > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
                      > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Gary,
                      > > > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
                      > > > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
                      > > > Larry
                      > > >
                      > > > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@>
                      > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                      > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                      > > > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.
                      > > >
                      > > > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.
                      > > >
                      > > > If not, you need to make adjustments.
                      > > >
                      > > > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.
                      > > >
                      > > > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.
                      > > >
                      > > > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.
                      > > >
                      > > > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.
                      > > >
                      > > > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.
                      > > >
                      > > > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P
                      > > >
                      > > > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)
                      > > >
                      > > > Gary
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • rsburritt@gmail.com
                      Hi Philip, I m sure you already know (but I ll mention it anyway) that what you are referring to...about the longer stem and less violent boiling...is the
                      Message 10 of 28 , Oct 2, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi Philip,

                        I'm sure you already know (but I'll mention it anyway) that what you are referring to...about the longer stem and less violent boiling...is the scientific concept of the displacement ratio.

                        It's another reason I mix and match the glass upper with the Nicro lower because the stem goes down further inside the pot. Additionally, using a DXU upper with the oldest version of the Cory automatic lower provides the same effect of very little bubbling. As I mentioned, I have glass lids that cover all my glass upper openings, but they give the added benefit of helping keep the heat in the upper, as well as the splash.

                        I have a metal lid that fits my Nicro uppers and even with low heat it still doesn't help much.

                        Roland


                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: pb_petty
                        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 6:24 AM
                        Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon


                        Roland,

                        I have no idea if the adapters for the induction hobs shorten their life. I certainly hope not, but it would be prudent to be careful as always.

                        One variable that we should not overlook in the discussion of the speed of heating water and how vigorous a "boil" is created in the top is the size of the gap between the end of the stem and the bottom of the base.

                        All things being equal I have found that the smaller the gap is, the more vigorous and turbulent the "boil" without burning the brew. Many vintage glass pots with cylindrical stems leave a greater gap for safety reasons than my modern Yama 8-cup. These vintage pots (glass) benefit somewhat I believe by some stirring during the boil whereas I find I do not need to stir my Yama to get the same results.

                        The shape of the stem, conical, flared etc. is a whole other subject to deal with. Then there is the issue of thermal conductivity and thermal cycling of metal vs. glass (for the base), etc. All these variables and more have been hit on in previous discussion threads, but I think it is beneficial to review the subjects periodically for newer members and to see if anyone has made any discoveries in technique(s) that we can all learn from.

                        Philip

                        --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Philip, I'm kind of leery to use an adapter with my induction standalone burner...doesn't it shorten the life of it?
                        > I'm actually content to use Cory automatics with a glass upper, or a Nicro lower with glass upper on my electric stove (used to have gas and miss it)...or, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes I use the butane burner with a glass lower/upper if I want variety.
                        >
                        > And, I haven't retired my french pressese either. Those are for lazy days...which actually is happening frequently lately. LOL
                        >
                        >
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: pb_petty
                        > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:08 PM
                        > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                        >
                        >
                        > Roland,
                        >
                        > You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters when a friend using copper pots used one on his induction hob. I cook with vintage copper pieces almost exclusively.
                        >
                        > Philip
                        >
                        > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.
                        > >
                        > > Roland
                        > >
                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > From: pb_petty
                        > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                        > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM
                        > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.
                        > >
                        > > Philip
                        > >
                        > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.
                        > > > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.
                        > > >
                        > > > Roland
                        > > >
                        > > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > > From: Larry Hollenberg
                        > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                        > > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
                        > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > Gary,
                        > > > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
                        > > > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
                        > > > Larry
                        > > >
                        > > > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@>
                        > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                        > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                        > > > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.
                        > > >
                        > > > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.
                        > > >
                        > > > If not, you need to make adjustments.
                        > > >
                        > > > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.
                        > > >
                        > > > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.
                        > > >
                        > > > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.
                        > > >
                        > > > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.
                        > > >
                        > > > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.
                        > > >
                        > > > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P
                        > > >
                        > > > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)
                        > > >
                        > > > Gary
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Larry Hollenberg
                        Just a side comment here, and one that at one point I think I may have mentioned before, but we seem to have more scientific minds working here now.   Its
                        Message 11 of 28 , Oct 2, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Just a side comment here, and one that at one point I think I may have mentioned before, but we seem to have more scientific minds working here now.  
                          Its interesting the theories about the distance from the bottom of the pots in relation to the brew effects. Another comment by Phillip made me think about the design of the uptake tubes and how they effect results.  
                          I don't know if companies such as Kent took into consideration the extra large volume of air they were displacing though the very wide tapered tube they used.  But I used to think that the reason the kents with the porcelain filters could make decent coffee was the fact that the ones I had, seemed not to be prone to raising the water too quickly. It seemed the extra large tube caused the water to remain in the lower bowl longer and when it did finally raise it was hotter than water in the corys or silex's.  I checked this with thermometers a few times and if I recall the kent was nearly 20 degrees hotter in the top that the others normally were. That seemed to translate into a better brew, perhaps at a closer to the idea heat point than the others. 
                          Just a thoughtLarry
                          --- On Fri, 10/2/09, rsburritt@... <rsburritt@...> wrote:

                          From: rsburritt@... <rsburritt@...>
                          Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                          To: "VACUUM POT GROUP" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
                          Date: Friday, October 2, 2009, 8:01 AM













                           





                          Hi Philip,



                          I'm sure you already know (but I'll mention it anyway) that what you are referring to...about the longer stem and less violent boiling...is the scientific concept of the displacement ratio.



                          It's another reason I mix and match the glass upper with the Nicro lower because the stem goes down further inside the pot. Additionally, using a DXU upper with the oldest version of the Cory automatic lower provides the same effect of very little bubbling. As I mentioned, I have glass lids that cover all my glass upper openings, but they give the added benefit of helping keep the heat in the upper, as well as the splash.



                          I have a metal lid that fits my Nicro uppers and even with low heat it still doesn't help much.



                          Roland



                          ----- Original Message -----

                          From: pb_petty

                          To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                          Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 6:24 AM

                          Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon



                          Roland,



                          I have no idea if the adapters for the induction hobs shorten their life. I certainly hope not, but it would be prudent to be careful as always.



                          One variable that we should not overlook in the discussion of the speed of heating water and how vigorous a "boil" is created in the top is the size of the gap between the end of the stem and the bottom of the base.



                          All things being equal I have found that the smaller the gap is, the more vigorous and turbulent the "boil" without burning the brew. Many vintage glass pots with cylindrical stems leave a greater gap for safety reasons than my modern Yama 8-cup. These vintage pots (glass) benefit somewhat I believe by some stirring during the boil whereas I find I do not need to stir my Yama to get the same results.



                          The shape of the stem, conical, flared etc. is a whole other subject to deal with. Then there is the issue of thermal conductivity and thermal cycling of metal vs. glass (for the base), etc. All these variables and more have been hit on in previous discussion threads, but I think it is beneficial to review the subjects periodically for newer members and to see if anyone has made any discoveries in technique(s) that we can all learn from.



                          Philip



                          --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@. ..> wrote:

                          >

                          > Philip, I'm kind of leery to use an adapter with my induction standalone burner...doesn' t it shorten the life of it?

                          > I'm actually content to use Cory automatics with a glass upper, or a Nicro lower with glass upper on my electric stove (used to have gas and miss it)...or, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes I use the butane burner with a glass lower/upper if I want variety.

                          >

                          > And, I haven't retired my french pressese either. Those are for lazy days...which actually is happening frequently lately. LOL

                          >

                          >

                          > ----- Original Message -----

                          > From: pb_petty

                          > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                          > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:08 PM

                          > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

                          >

                          >

                          > Roland,

                          >

                          > You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters when a friend using copper pots used one on his induction hob. I cook with vintage copper pieces almost exclusively.

                          >

                          > Philip

                          >

                          > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:

                          > >

                          > > Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.

                          > >

                          > > Roland

                          > >

                          > > ----- Original Message -----

                          > > From: pb_petty

                          > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                          > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM

                          > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

                          > >

                          > >

                          > > Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.

                          > >

                          > > Philip

                          > >

                          > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:

                          > > >

                          > > > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.

                          > > > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.

                          > > >

                          > > > Roland

                          > > >

                          > > > ----- Original Message -----

                          > > > From: Larry Hollenberg

                          > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                          > > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM

                          > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

                          > > >

                          > > >

                          > > > Gary,

                          > > > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.

                          > > > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.

                          > > > Larry

                          > > >

                          > > > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@> wrote:

                          > > >

                          > > > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@>

                          > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

                          > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                          > > > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM

                          > > >

                          > > >

                          > > >

                          > > > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.

                          > > >

                          > > > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.

                          > > >

                          > > > If not, you need to make adjustments.

                          > > >

                          > > > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.

                          > > >

                          > > > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.

                          > > >

                          > > > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.

                          > > >

                          > > > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.

                          > > >

                          > > > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.

                          > > >

                          > > > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P

                          > > >

                          > > > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)

                          > > >

                          > > > Gary

                          > > >

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                        • pb_petty
                          Roland, You mention using Cory automatics with a glass upper. Do you mean the Cory DEA Automatic that came standard with a glass upper (2lbs 5oz, 800W base) or
                          Message 12 of 28 , Oct 2, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Roland,

                            You mention using Cory automatics with a glass upper. Do you mean the Cory DEA Automatic that came standard with a glass upper (2lbs 5oz, 800W base) or are you putting a glass top in place of the metal top on the all metal Cory automatic ACB (2lbs 4.6oz, 650W base)? With the thermal mass being equal on the two pots, it would seem the lower wattage would produce a better (faster) cool down, especially if preheated water were used. What is your real world experience?

                            Philip

                            --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Philip, I'm kind of leery to use an adapter with my induction standalone burner...doesn't it shorten the life of it?
                            > I'm actually content to use Cory automatics with a glass upper, or a Nicro lower with glass upper on my electric stove (used to have gas and miss it)...or, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes I use the butane burner with a glass lower/upper if I want variety.
                            >
                            > And, I haven't retired my french pressese either. Those are for lazy days...which actually is happening frequently lately. LOL
                            >
                            >
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: pb_petty
                            > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:08 PM
                            > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                            >
                            >
                            > Roland,
                            >
                            > You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters when a friend using copper pots used one on his induction hob. I cook with vintage copper pieces almost exclusively.
                            >
                            > Philip
                            >
                            > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.
                            > >
                            > > Roland
                            > >
                            > > ----- Original Message -----
                            > > From: pb_petty
                            > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                            > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM
                            > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.
                            > >
                            > > Philip
                            > >
                            > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.
                            > > > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.
                            > > >
                            > > > Roland
                            > > >
                            > > > ----- Original Message -----
                            > > > From: Larry Hollenberg
                            > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                            > > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
                            > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > Gary,
                            > > > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
                            > > > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
                            > > > Larry
                            > > >
                            > > > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@>
                            > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                            > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                            > > > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.
                            > > >
                            > > > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.
                            > > >
                            > > > If not, you need to make adjustments.
                            > > >
                            > > > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.
                            > > >
                            > > > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.
                            > > >
                            > > > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.
                            > > >
                            > > > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.
                            > > >
                            > > > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.
                            > > >
                            > > > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P
                            > > >
                            > > > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)
                            > > >
                            > > > Gary
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
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                            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > > >
                            > > >
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                          • rsburritt@gmail.com
                            Hi Larry, Perhaps that could be; however, I would be inclined to think that the reason for it is not so much from the air displacement ratio, but rather the
                            Message 13 of 28 , Oct 2, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Hi Larry,
                              Perhaps that could be; however, I would be inclined to think that the reason for it is not so much from the air displacement ratio, but rather the larger glass surface on the wide funnel creates a transfer of heat/cool so that there is a difference in the way the water transfers upward. Either the air in the lower cools a bit because it has a cooling surface (the wider glass area from the larger funnel diameter), so it takes it longer to head north...or, perhaps when it's already north there is more of a transfer of heat from the lower into the upper because of this wider funnel surface...or perhaps it's a bit of both?

                              I agree with you...I like the scientific minds at work here...very interesting discussion.

                              Roland


                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Larry Hollenberg
                              To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 7:12 AM
                              Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon


                              Just a side comment here, and one that at one point I think I may have mentioned before, but we seem to have more scientific minds working here now.
                              Its interesting the theories about the distance from the bottom of the pots in relation to the brew effects. Another comment by Phillip made me think about the design of the uptake tubes and how they effect results.
                              I don't know if companies such as Kent took into consideration the extra large volume of air they were displacing though the very wide tapered tube they used. But I used to think that the reason the kents with the porcelain filters could make decent coffee was the fact that the ones I had, seemed not to be prone to raising the water too quickly. It seemed the extra large tube caused the water to remain in the lower bowl longer and when it did finally raise it was hotter than water in the corys or silex's. I checked this with thermometers a few times and if I recall the kent was nearly 20 degrees hotter in the top that the others normally were. That seemed to translate into a better brew, perhaps at a closer to the idea heat point than the others.
                              Just a thoughtLarry
                              --- On Fri, 10/2/09, rsburritt@... <rsburritt@...> wrote:

                              From: rsburritt@... <rsburritt@...>
                              Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                              To: "VACUUM POT GROUP" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
                              Date: Friday, October 2, 2009, 8:01 AM



                              Hi Philip,

                              I'm sure you already know (but I'll mention it anyway) that what you are referring to...about the longer stem and less violent boiling...is the scientific concept of the displacement ratio.

                              It's another reason I mix and match the glass upper with the Nicro lower because the stem goes down further inside the pot. Additionally, using a DXU upper with the oldest version of the Cory automatic lower provides the same effect of very little bubbling. As I mentioned, I have glass lids that cover all my glass upper openings, but they give the added benefit of helping keep the heat in the upper, as well as the splash.

                              I have a metal lid that fits my Nicro uppers and even with low heat it still doesn't help much.

                              Roland

                              ----- Original Message -----

                              From: pb_petty

                              To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                              Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 6:24 AM

                              Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

                              Roland,

                              I have no idea if the adapters for the induction hobs shorten their life. I certainly hope not, but it would be prudent to be careful as always.

                              One variable that we should not overlook in the discussion of the speed of heating water and how vigorous a "boil" is created in the top is the size of the gap between the end of the stem and the bottom of the base.

                              All things being equal I have found that the smaller the gap is, the more vigorous and turbulent the "boil" without burning the brew. Many vintage glass pots with cylindrical stems leave a greater gap for safety reasons than my modern Yama 8-cup. These vintage pots (glass) benefit somewhat I believe by some stirring during the boil whereas I find I do not need to stir my Yama to get the same results.

                              The shape of the stem, conical, flared etc. is a whole other subject to deal with. Then there is the issue of thermal conductivity and thermal cycling of metal vs. glass (for the base), etc. All these variables and more have been hit on in previous discussion threads, but I think it is beneficial to review the subjects periodically for newer members and to see if anyone has made any discoveries in technique(s) that we can all learn from.

                              Philip

                              --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@. ..> wrote:

                              >

                              > Philip, I'm kind of leery to use an adapter with my induction standalone burner...doesn' t it shorten the life of it?

                              > I'm actually content to use Cory automatics with a glass upper, or a Nicro lower with glass upper on my electric stove (used to have gas and miss it)...or, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes I use the butane burner with a glass lower/upper if I want variety.

                              >

                              > And, I haven't retired my french pressese either. Those are for lazy days...which actually is happening frequently lately. LOL

                              >

                              >

                              > ----- Original Message -----

                              > From: pb_petty

                              > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                              > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:08 PM

                              > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

                              >

                              >

                              > Roland,

                              >

                              > You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters when a friend using copper pots used one on his induction hob. I cook with vintage copper pieces almost exclusively.

                              >

                              > Philip

                              >

                              > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:

                              > >

                              > > Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.

                              > >

                              > > Roland

                              > >

                              > > ----- Original Message -----

                              > > From: pb_petty

                              > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                              > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM

                              > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

                              > >

                              > >

                              > > Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.

                              > >

                              > > Philip

                              > >

                              > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:

                              > > >

                              > > > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.

                              > > > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.

                              > > >

                              > > > Roland

                              > > >

                              > > > ----- Original Message -----

                              > > > From: Larry Hollenberg

                              > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                              > > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM

                              > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > > Gary,

                              > > > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.

                              > > > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.

                              > > > Larry

                              > > >

                              > > > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@> wrote:

                              > > >

                              > > > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@>

                              > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

                              > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                              > > > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.

                              > > >

                              > > > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.

                              > > >

                              > > > If not, you need to make adjustments.

                              > > >

                              > > > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.

                              > > >

                              > > > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.

                              > > >

                              > > > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.

                              > > >

                              > > > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.

                              > > >

                              > > > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.

                              > > >

                              > > > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P

                              > > >

                              > > > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)

                              > > >

                              > > > Gary

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > >

                              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                              > > >

                              > >

                              > >

                              > >

                              > >

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                              > >

                              >

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                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Larry Hollenberg
                              Roland, As you can tell, mine is not one of the scientific ones.  I don t know the actual reason other than to observe it took longer to raise and the tube is
                              Message 14 of 28 , Oct 2, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Roland,
                                As you can tell, mine is not one of the scientific ones.  I don't know the actual reason other than to observe it took longer to raise and the tube is wider than most.  How or why it works the way it does I will leave for you all to debate. 
                                Larry

                                --- On Fri, 10/2/09, rsburritt@... <rsburritt@...> wrote:

                                From: rsburritt@... <rsburritt@...>
                                Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                To: "VACUUM POT GROUP" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
                                Date: Friday, October 2, 2009, 8:20 AM













                                 





                                Hi Larry,

                                Perhaps that could be; however, I would be inclined to think that the reason for it is not so much from the air displacement ratio, but rather the larger glass surface on the wide funnel creates a transfer of heat/cool so that there is a difference in the way the water transfers upward. Either the air in the lower cools a bit because it has a cooling surface (the wider glass area from the larger funnel diameter), so it takes it longer to head north...or, perhaps when it's already north there is more of a transfer of heat from the lower into the upper because of this wider funnel surface...or perhaps it's a bit of both?



                                I agree with you...I like the scientific minds at work here...very interesting discussion.



                                Roland



                                ----- Original Message -----

                                From: Larry Hollenberg

                                To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                                Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 7:12 AM

                                Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon



                                Just a side comment here, and one that at one point I think I may have mentioned before, but we seem to have more scientific minds working here now.

                                Its interesting the theories about the distance from the bottom of the pots in relation to the brew effects. Another comment by Phillip made me think about the design of the uptake tubes and how they effect results.

                                I don't know if companies such as Kent took into consideration the extra large volume of air they were displacing though the very wide tapered tube they used. But I used to think that the reason the kents with the porcelain filters could make decent coffee was the fact that the ones I had, seemed not to be prone to raising the water too quickly. It seemed the extra large tube caused the water to remain in the lower bowl longer and when it did finally raise it was hotter than water in the corys or silex's. I checked this with thermometers a few times and if I recall the kent was nearly 20 degrees hotter in the top that the others normally were. That seemed to translate into a better brew, perhaps at a closer to the idea heat point than the others.

                                Just a thoughtLarry

                                --- On Fri, 10/2/09, rsburritt@gmail. com <rsburritt@gmail. com> wrote:



                                From: rsburritt@gmail. com <rsburritt@gmail. com>

                                Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon

                                To: "VACUUM POT GROUP" <vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com>

                                Date: Friday, October 2, 2009, 8:01 AM



                                Hi Philip,



                                I'm sure you already know (but I'll mention it anyway) that what you are referring to...about the longer stem and less violent boiling...is the scientific concept of the displacement ratio.



                                It's another reason I mix and match the glass upper with the Nicro lower because the stem goes down further inside the pot. Additionally, using a DXU upper with the oldest version of the Cory automatic lower provides the same effect of very little bubbling. As I mentioned, I have glass lids that cover all my glass upper openings, but they give the added benefit of helping keep the heat in the upper, as well as the splash.



                                I have a metal lid that fits my Nicro uppers and even with low heat it still doesn't help much.



                                Roland



                                ----- Original Message -----



                                From: pb_petty



                                To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com



                                Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 6:24 AM



                                Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon



                                Roland,



                                I have no idea if the adapters for the induction hobs shorten their life. I certainly hope not, but it would be prudent to be careful as always.



                                One variable that we should not overlook in the discussion of the speed of heating water and how vigorous a "boil" is created in the top is the size of the gap between the end of the stem and the bottom of the base.



                                All things being equal I have found that the smaller the gap is, the more vigorous and turbulent the "boil" without burning the brew. Many vintage glass pots with cylindrical stems leave a greater gap for safety reasons than my modern Yama 8-cup. These vintage pots (glass) benefit somewhat I believe by some stirring during the boil whereas I find I do not need to stir my Yama to get the same results.



                                The shape of the stem, conical, flared etc. is a whole other subject to deal with. Then there is the issue of thermal conductivity and thermal cycling of metal vs. glass (for the base), etc. All these variables and more have been hit on in previous discussion threads, but I think it is beneficial to review the subjects periodically for newer members and to see if anyone has made any discoveries in technique(s) that we can all learn from.



                                Philip



                                --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@. ..> wrote:



                                >



                                > Philip, I'm kind of leery to use an adapter with my induction standalone burner...doesn' t it shorten the life of it?



                                > I'm actually content to use Cory automatics with a glass upper, or a Nicro lower with glass upper on my electric stove (used to have gas and miss it)...or, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes I use the butane burner with a glass lower/upper if I want variety.



                                >



                                > And, I haven't retired my french pressese either. Those are for lazy days...which actually is happening frequently lately. LOL



                                >



                                >



                                > ----- Original Message -----



                                > From: pb_petty



                                > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com



                                > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:08 PM



                                > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon



                                >



                                >



                                > Roland,



                                >



                                > You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters when a friend using copper pots used one on his induction hob. I cook with vintage copper pieces almost exclusively.



                                >



                                > Philip



                                >



                                > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:



                                > >



                                > > Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.



                                > >



                                > > Roland



                                > >



                                > > ----- Original Message -----



                                > > From: pb_petty



                                > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com



                                > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM



                                > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon



                                > >



                                > >



                                > > Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.



                                > >



                                > > Philip



                                > >



                                > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:



                                > > >



                                > > > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.



                                > > > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.



                                > > >



                                > > > Roland



                                > > >



                                > > > ----- Original Message -----



                                > > > From: Larry Hollenberg



                                > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com



                                > > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM



                                > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon



                                > > >



                                > > >



                                > > > Gary,



                                > > > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.



                                > > > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.



                                > > > Larry



                                > > >



                                > > > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@> wrote:



                                > > >



                                > > > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@>



                                > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon



                                > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com



                                > > > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM



                                > > >



                                > > >



                                > > >



                                > > > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.



                                > > >



                                > > > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.



                                > > >



                                > > > If not, you need to make adjustments.



                                > > >



                                > > > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.



                                > > >



                                > > > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.



                                > > >



                                > > > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.



                                > > >



                                > > > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.



                                > > >



                                > > > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.



                                > > >



                                > > > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P



                                > > >



                                > > > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)



                                > > >



                                > > > Gary



                                > > >



                                > > >



                                > > >



                                > > >



                                > > >



                                > > >



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                                > > >



                                > > >



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                                > > >



                                > > >



                                > > >



                                > > >



                                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                                > > >



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                              • pb_petty
                                Agreed. I know we have a lot of talent including mechanical engineers here and it can be fun to do some research to validate/invalidate the why of observed
                                Message 15 of 28 , Oct 2, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Agreed. I know we have a lot of talent including mechanical engineers here and it can be fun to do some research to validate/invalidate the why of observed behavior, or predict it.

                                  I once did a simplified table of how high a given amount of water could be raised in a stem of a given diameter with most other variables (heat, time etc) being constants. It was interesting. With a background in physics this stuff appeals to me.

                                  The Kent (my first vacpot love) stem shape does indeed slow the transfer of heat as any cone will if the narrow end is at the heat source. The key is that the reverse happens when the wide end is at the heat source.

                                  I saw an old vacpot patent I have lost track of which used a cone-shaped stem with the wide end at the bottom. At the time it was said this produced much better results than other designs. I hope to test that by making such a pot stem of metal, but it is true that a cone of that shape will accelerate the movement of heat upward faster than any other shape.

                                  I think we have a lot to learn from our vintage pots, but I think there is much we can improve in design with applied scientific knowledge and much better materials and manufacturing techniques available to us. It just takes thinking out of the box.

                                  Philip

                                  --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Hi Larry,
                                  > Perhaps that could be; however, I would be inclined to think that the reason for it is not so much from the air displacement ratio, but rather the larger glass surface on the wide funnel creates a transfer of heat/cool so that there is a difference in the way the water transfers upward. Either the air in the lower cools a bit because it has a cooling surface (the wider glass area from the larger funnel diameter), so it takes it longer to head north...or, perhaps when it's already north there is more of a transfer of heat from the lower into the upper because of this wider funnel surface...or perhaps it's a bit of both?
                                  >
                                  > I agree with you...I like the scientific minds at work here...very interesting discussion.
                                  >
                                  > Roland
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ----- Original Message -----
                                  > From: Larry Hollenberg
                                  > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                  > Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 7:12 AM
                                  > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Just a side comment here, and one that at one point I think I may have mentioned before, but we seem to have more scientific minds working here now.
                                  > Its interesting the theories about the distance from the bottom of the pots in relation to the brew effects. Another comment by Phillip made me think about the design of the uptake tubes and how they effect results.
                                  > I don't know if companies such as Kent took into consideration the extra large volume of air they were displacing though the very wide tapered tube they used. But I used to think that the reason the kents with the porcelain filters could make decent coffee was the fact that the ones I had, seemed not to be prone to raising the water too quickly. It seemed the extra large tube caused the water to remain in the lower bowl longer and when it did finally raise it was hotter than water in the corys or silex's. I checked this with thermometers a few times and if I recall the kent was nearly 20 degrees hotter in the top that the others normally were. That seemed to translate into a better brew, perhaps at a closer to the idea heat point than the others.
                                  > Just a thoughtLarry
                                  > --- On Fri, 10/2/09, rsburritt@... <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > From: rsburritt@... <rsburritt@...>
                                  > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                  > To: "VACUUM POT GROUP" <vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com>
                                  > Date: Friday, October 2, 2009, 8:01 AM
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Hi Philip,
                                  >
                                  > I'm sure you already know (but I'll mention it anyway) that what you are referring to...about the longer stem and less violent boiling...is the scientific concept of the displacement ratio.
                                  >
                                  > It's another reason I mix and match the glass upper with the Nicro lower because the stem goes down further inside the pot. Additionally, using a DXU upper with the oldest version of the Cory automatic lower provides the same effect of very little bubbling. As I mentioned, I have glass lids that cover all my glass upper openings, but they give the added benefit of helping keep the heat in the upper, as well as the splash.
                                  >
                                  > I have a metal lid that fits my Nicro uppers and even with low heat it still doesn't help much.
                                  >
                                  > Roland
                                  >
                                  > ----- Original Message -----
                                  >
                                  > From: pb_petty
                                  >
                                  > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com
                                  >
                                  > Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 6:24 AM
                                  >
                                  > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                  >
                                  > Roland,
                                  >
                                  > I have no idea if the adapters for the induction hobs shorten their life. I certainly hope not, but it would be prudent to be careful as always.
                                  >
                                  > One variable that we should not overlook in the discussion of the speed of heating water and how vigorous a "boil" is created in the top is the size of the gap between the end of the stem and the bottom of the base.
                                  >
                                  > All things being equal I have found that the smaller the gap is, the more vigorous and turbulent the "boil" without burning the brew. Many vintage glass pots with cylindrical stems leave a greater gap for safety reasons than my modern Yama 8-cup. These vintage pots (glass) benefit somewhat I believe by some stirring during the boil whereas I find I do not need to stir my Yama to get the same results.
                                  >
                                  > The shape of the stem, conical, flared etc. is a whole other subject to deal with. Then there is the issue of thermal conductivity and thermal cycling of metal vs. glass (for the base), etc. All these variables and more have been hit on in previous discussion threads, but I think it is beneficial to review the subjects periodically for newer members and to see if anyone has made any discoveries in technique(s) that we can all learn from.
                                  >
                                  > Philip
                                  >
                                  > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@ ..> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > > Philip, I'm kind of leery to use an adapter with my induction standalone burner...doesn' t it shorten the life of it?
                                  >
                                  > > I'm actually content to use Cory automatics with a glass upper, or a Nicro lower with glass upper on my electric stove (used to have gas and miss it)...or, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes I use the butane burner with a glass lower/upper if I want variety.
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > > And, I haven't retired my french pressese either. Those are for lazy days...which actually is happening frequently lately. LOL
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > > ----- Original Message -----
                                  >
                                  > > From: pb_petty
                                  >
                                  > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com
                                  >
                                  > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:08 PM
                                  >
                                  > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > > Roland,
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > > You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters when a friend using copper pots used one on his induction hob. I cook with vintage copper pieces almost exclusively.
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > > Philip
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.
                                  >
                                  > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > Roland
                                  >
                                  > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > ----- Original Message -----
                                  >
                                  > > > From: pb_petty
                                  >
                                  > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com
                                  >
                                  > > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM
                                  >
                                  > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                  >
                                  > > >
                                  >
                                  > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.
                                  >
                                  > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > Philip
                                  >
                                  > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.
                                  >
                                  > > > > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > Roland
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > ----- Original Message -----
                                  >
                                  > > > > From: Larry Hollenberg
                                  >
                                  > > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com
                                  >
                                  > > > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
                                  >
                                  > > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > Gary,
                                  >
                                  > > > > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
                                  >
                                  > > > > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
                                  >
                                  > > > > Larry
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@>
                                  >
                                  > > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                  >
                                  > > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com
                                  >
                                  > > > > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > If not, you need to make adjustments.
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)
                                  >
                                  > > > >
                                  >
                                  > > > > Gary
                                  >
                                  > > > >
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                                • rsburritt@gmail.com
                                  I use glass uppers on all my automatics On the DEA, the 1st Generation has a DEU glass upper, but I don t use it. The 2nd Generation DEA came with a DRU glass
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Oct 2, 2009
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    I use glass uppers on all my automatics
                                    On the DEA, the 1st Generation has a DEU glass upper, but I don't use it.
                                    The 2nd Generation DEA came with a DRU glass upper, but again I don't use it.
                                    I prefer to use DXU uppers on both of them because of the longer funnel spout and larger bowl (giving more splash room)

                                    I don't use preheated water.

                                    On wattage--I have a Variac packed away and just as soon as I find it I plan to experiment with lowering the voltage, which will reduce the output of the heating element (similar to putting it on a dimmer). Since the thermostat is mechanical (not electronic), there will be no adverse effect. I will post my results, but if anyone else has a Variac or obtains one, it would be interesting to read what you find out.

                                    Roland


                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: pb_petty
                                    To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 7:17 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon


                                    Roland,

                                    You mention using Cory automatics with a glass upper. Do you mean the Cory DEA Automatic that came standard with a glass upper (2lbs 5oz, 800W base) or are you putting a glass top in place of the metal top on the all metal Cory automatic ACB (2lbs 4.6oz, 650W base)? With the thermal mass being equal on the two pots, it would seem the lower wattage would produce a better (faster) cool down, especially if preheated water were used. What is your real world experience?

                                    Philip

                                    --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Philip, I'm kind of leery to use an adapter with my induction standalone burner...doesn't it shorten the life of it?
                                    > I'm actually content to use Cory automatics with a glass upper, or a Nicro lower with glass upper on my electric stove (used to have gas and miss it)...or, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes I use the butane burner with a glass lower/upper if I want variety.
                                    >
                                    > And, I haven't retired my french pressese either. Those are for lazy days...which actually is happening frequently lately. LOL
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ----- Original Message -----
                                    > From: pb_petty
                                    > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                    > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:08 PM
                                    > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Roland,
                                    >
                                    > You are absolutely correct. I neglected to mention the adapters for non-ferrous metals needed for the induction hobs. I was first exposed to adapters when a friend using copper pots used one on his induction hob. I cook with vintage copper pieces almost exclusively.
                                    >
                                    > Philip
                                    >
                                    > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Magnets don't stick to any of my nicros, I have not had personal contact with any other metal bottomed pot. But unless it's ferrous, it won't work on induction because of the way induction works.
                                    > >
                                    > > Roland
                                    > >
                                    > > ----- Original Message -----
                                    > > From: pb_petty
                                    > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                    > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 2:56 PM
                                    > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > Has anyone using a metal bottomed vacpot tried using an induction hob to heat the water? Due to the way they work it may be a great compromise and a faster method than the makers of these pots ever conceived of to make a pot of coffee without burning.
                                    > >
                                    > > Philip
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Those little countertop/tabletop butane grills also work well I have found. The kind that takes the small can of butane in the side.
                                    > > > Since I have an electric stove, I had used my butane burner...and had good results with it.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Roland
                                    > > >
                                    > > > ----- Original Message -----
                                    > > > From: Larry Hollenberg
                                    > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                    > > > Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 12:56 PM
                                    > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Gary,
                                    > > > I agree with your points. It only recently became clear to me that those little stoves had a tendency to overheat the coffee. Since I started using the stove, in my case a vintage oil range, I am getting much better results due to the flame of a wick burner being as much as 12 inches below the pot. Even it can overheat and dance the cory rod, ect, but not anything like the violent boiling the company stoves could create. I think personally that is where the downfall of almost every electric vacpot, at least of the vintage types lies. The only one that was somewhat less troublesome seemed to be the Knapp Monarch which uses a lower watt stove by two thirds compared to Sunbeam. Corys also are less wattage but in my usage more prone to faulty thermostats effecting the brew time.
                                    > > > If your coffee is displaying that "burnt" edge, its probably too high a heat.
                                    > > > Larry
                                    > > >
                                    > > > --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Garybt3 <garybt3@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > From: Garybt3 <garybt3@>
                                    > > > Subject: Re: [vacpot] nicro top pot filling too soon
                                    > > > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                    > > > Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 1:20 PM
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > > A couple of things to think about when using your Nicro or your glass vacpots.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Extraction time. No more than 4 minutes total contact time. Once you introduce the coffee grounds into your pot, start a timer. Gently stir a couple of times to completely immerse all the grounds, then leave it alone. @ the 3 minute mark, remove from heat source. If your draw down time is exactly 1 minute, you are good to go.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > If not, you need to make adjustments.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > A super slow draw of 2 minutes is not a good thing. It might mean that the grinder is making too many fines, or coffee 'dust', and it will cause a stall. Some people use a fine mesh screen to sort out the dust. A cloth filter is more forgiving in my opinion, but it can clog too.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > If your heat source is too hot, it will bubble rapidly, and this is not a good thing either. If your glass Cory Rod is 'dancing', TURN THE HEAT DOWN &, WAIT until it 'stabilizes' BEFORE adding in your coffee grounds.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Your goal is to keep it just barely hot enough to keep the water in the upper chamber while the extraction process occurs.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > If your stainless steel Nicro filter has too many bubbles moving rapidly through it, then you need to adjust the heat a little bit to slow it down.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > If your pot is filling too quickly, it might be that you are using too much heat. You are 'pre-heating' the metal in the pot with hot water. Remove the pot from the heat source, let the water return to the lower pot, lower the heat a bit, and try again. Using a decent thermometer, measure the water temp in the upper chamber. The goal is 195F to 204F. + or - 5F is acceptable results.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Whew, long post, sorry for the rambling on part...Time for some more coffee ;-P
                                    > > >
                                    > > > I love vacpots, I have 30 + :-)
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Gary
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