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Pyrex Vac Pots

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  • heacdchange
    Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex? What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots? Thanks, Jason
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 16, 2009
      Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?

      What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?

      Thanks,
      Jason
    • Dave Leonard
      I had a Cafex vac pot made of Pyrex. Dave ... From: heacdchange Subject: [vacpot] Pyrex Vac Pots To:
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 16, 2009
        I had a Cafex vac pot made of Pyrex.

        Dave


        --- On Wed, 9/16/09, heacdchange <headchangestudio@...> wrote:

        From: heacdchange <headchangestudio@...>
        Subject: [vacpot] Pyrex Vac Pots
        To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, September 16, 2009, 12:52 PM






         





        Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?



        What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?



        Thanks,

        Jason




























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • pb_petty
        I am fascinated by the subject of who made the glass for whom at any point in time (for all vacpots.) In the Advertisements album I have posted a 1955 letter
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 20, 2009
          I am fascinated by the subject of who made the glass for whom at any point in time (for all vacpots.)

          In the Advertisements album I have posted a 1955 letter from Hellem which brags that Hellem is made with "Pyrex Glass." Prior to 1955 I have no idea who Hellem used. Perhaps others can fill in that gap in knowledge. The marks on my 10-cup Hellem do not indicate who made the glass. Neither do the instructions, the box or any of the materials that came with it.

          Hill-Shaw used at least two glass makers for their Vaculator glass models. My early Vaculator Junior with instructions has the glass marked as made by Glasbake for the Hill-Shaw Co. with the recognizable Glasbake shaped logo. I have an 8-cup Vaculator with a "comma-shaped" handle (Steven has nice photos of his in his Vaculator album) complete with WWII price control docs that has the glass etched with "Pyrex Brand Glassware made for the Hill-Shaw Co". The odd thing is that the Pyrex mark has been made to look very close to the Glasbake mark on my older Vaculator Junior to the extent of shaping the word "Glassware" to look like the Glasbake logo. A 12-cup vaculator I have which I believe dates from the 1940s is only marked 12UA and 12LA. I believe those are Pyrex marks (someone please correct me if I am wrong.) So when did Hill-Shaw change from Glasbake to Pyrex glass? Based on my pieces it seems it would have to be around 1939. Anyone with definitive a definitive date please pass it on to us.

          I hope others will take up your question Jason and help us all learn more about the subject of the glass used in vacpots. Steven has documented the glass used in the pots in his albums and the marks very exhaustively as have others. That is a great resource we already have to answer some of the questions on glass.

          Philip

          --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@...> wrote:
          >
          > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?
          >
          > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Jason
          >
        • lobsterboy582000
          I know that Pyrex is a trademark name for Corning- the heat resistant glass was developed originally for railroad lamps I Googled up Glasbake apparently made
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 20, 2009
            I know that Pyrex is a trademark name for Corning- the heat resistant glass was developed originally for railroad lamps

            I Googled up Glasbake apparently made by McKee Glass Company of Pittsburgh



            --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "pb_petty" <pbpetty@...> wrote:
            >
            > I am fascinated by the subject of who made the glass for whom at any point in time (for all vacpots.)
            >
            > In the Advertisements album I have posted a 1955 letter from Hellem which brags that Hellem is made with "Pyrex Glass." Prior to 1955 I have no idea who Hellem used. Perhaps others can fill in that gap in knowledge. The marks on my 10-cup Hellem do not indicate who made the glass. Neither do the instructions, the box or any of the materials that came with it.
            >
            > Hill-Shaw used at least two glass makers for their Vaculator glass models. My early Vaculator Junior with instructions has the glass marked as made by Glasbake for the Hill-Shaw Co. with the recognizable Glasbake shaped logo. I have an 8-cup Vaculator with a "comma-shaped" handle (Steven has nice photos of his in his Vaculator album) complete with WWII price control docs that has the glass etched with "Pyrex Brand Glassware made for the Hill-Shaw Co". The odd thing is that the Pyrex mark has been made to look very close to the Glasbake mark on my older Vaculator Junior to the extent of shaping the word "Glassware" to look like the Glasbake logo. A 12-cup vaculator I have which I believe dates from the 1940s is only marked 12UA and 12LA. I believe those are Pyrex marks (someone please correct me if I am wrong.) So when did Hill-Shaw change from Glasbake to Pyrex glass? Based on my pieces it seems it would have to be around 1939. Anyone with definitive a definitive date please pass it on to us.
            >
            > I hope others will take up your question Jason and help us all learn more about the subject of the glass used in vacpots. Steven has documented the glass used in the pots in his albums and the marks very exhaustively as have others. That is a great resource we already have to answer some of the questions on glass.
            >
            > Philip
            >
            > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?
            > >
            > > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?
            > >
            > > Thanks,
            > > Jason
            > >
            >
          • rsburritt@gmail.com
            A few weeks ago I was researching Glasbake and read somewhere that at one time McKee made 70% of all the glass in the US, both industrial and residential. ...
            Message 5 of 17 , Sep 20, 2009
              A few weeks ago I was researching Glasbake and read somewhere that at one time McKee made 70% of all the glass in the US, both industrial and residential.


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: lobsterboy582000
              To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2009 10:24 PM
              Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots


              I know that Pyrex is a trademark name for Corning- the heat resistant glass was developed originally for railroad lamps

              I Googled up Glasbake apparently made by McKee Glass Company of Pittsburgh

              --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "pb_petty" <pbpetty@...> wrote:
              >
              > I am fascinated by the subject of who made the glass for whom at any point in time (for all vacpots.)
              >
              > In the Advertisements album I have posted a 1955 letter from Hellem which brags that Hellem is made with "Pyrex Glass." Prior to 1955 I have no idea who Hellem used. Perhaps others can fill in that gap in knowledge. The marks on my 10-cup Hellem do not indicate who made the glass. Neither do the instructions, the box or any of the materials that came with it.
              >
              > Hill-Shaw used at least two glass makers for their Vaculator glass models. My early Vaculator Junior with instructions has the glass marked as made by Glasbake for the Hill-Shaw Co. with the recognizable Glasbake shaped logo. I have an 8-cup Vaculator with a "comma-shaped" handle (Steven has nice photos of his in his Vaculator album) complete with WWII price control docs that has the glass etched with "Pyrex Brand Glassware made for the Hill-Shaw Co". The odd thing is that the Pyrex mark has been made to look very close to the Glasbake mark on my older Vaculator Junior to the extent of shaping the word "Glassware" to look like the Glasbake logo. A 12-cup vaculator I have which I believe dates from the 1940s is only marked 12UA and 12LA. I believe those are Pyrex marks (someone please correct me if I am wrong.) So when did Hill-Shaw change from Glasbake to Pyrex glass? Based on my pieces it seems it would have to be around 1939. Anyone with definitive a definitive date please pass it on to us.
              >
              > I hope others will take up your question Jason and help us all learn more about the subject of the glass used in vacpots. Steven has documented the glass used in the pots in his albums and the marks very exhaustively as have others. That is a great resource we already have to answer some of the questions on glass.
              >
              > Philip
              >
              > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?
              > >
              > > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?
              > >
              > > Thanks,
              > > Jason
              > >
              >





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • pb_petty
              In my research archive (not very big yet) I have the following info on McKee and Glasbake: The McKee and Brothers Co began in 1853 in Pittsburgh, PA. In 1888
              Message 6 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                In my research archive (not very big yet) I have the following info on McKee and Glasbake:

                The McKee and Brothers Co began in 1853 in Pittsburgh, PA. In 1888 the company moved to a town that was ultimately named Jeannette (PA) for the wife of McKee's founder. In 1903 the company was renamed McKee Glass Co. and did business under that name until 1951 when they became a division of the Thatcher Glass Co. McKee Glass not only made items under its own name but also produced under the "Glasbake" name. In the late 1920's when the other glass houses were fully automated, McKee was still hand pressing its wares. This may be the reason that McKee focused their efforts on kitchen and oven glass instead of dinnerware lines. When the depression hit, it was the popularity of McKee's Glasbake line and opaque kitchenware that carried them through. McKee didn't introduce automatic production methods until the 1940's. In 1961 Jeannette Glass Company bought the property and a variety of pressed glass items and ornamental tableware was manufactured there by Jeannette until it closed in 1983.

                Philip


                --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                >
                > A few weeks ago I was researching Glasbake and read somewhere that at one time McKee made 70% of all the glass in the US, both industrial and residential.
                >
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: lobsterboy582000
                > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2009 10:24 PM
                > Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots
                >
                >
                > I know that Pyrex is a trademark name for Corning- the heat resistant glass was developed originally for railroad lamps
                >
                > I Googled up Glasbake apparently made by McKee Glass Company of Pittsburgh
                >
                > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "pb_petty" <pbpetty@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I am fascinated by the subject of who made the glass for whom at any point in time (for all vacpots.)
                > >
                > > In the Advertisements album I have posted a 1955 letter from Hellem which brags that Hellem is made with "Pyrex Glass." Prior to 1955 I have no idea who Hellem used. Perhaps others can fill in that gap in knowledge. The marks on my 10-cup Hellem do not indicate who made the glass. Neither do the instructions, the box or any of the materials that came with it.
                > >
                > > Hill-Shaw used at least two glass makers for their Vaculator glass models. My early Vaculator Junior with instructions has the glass marked as made by Glasbake for the Hill-Shaw Co. with the recognizable Glasbake shaped logo. I have an 8-cup Vaculator with a "comma-shaped" handle (Steven has nice photos of his in his Vaculator album) complete with WWII price control docs that has the glass etched with "Pyrex Brand Glassware made for the Hill-Shaw Co". The odd thing is that the Pyrex mark has been made to look very close to the Glasbake mark on my older Vaculator Junior to the extent of shaping the word "Glassware" to look like the Glasbake logo. A 12-cup vaculator I have which I believe dates from the 1940s is only marked 12UA and 12LA. I believe those are Pyrex marks (someone please correct me if I am wrong.) So when did Hill-Shaw change from Glasbake to Pyrex glass? Based on my pieces it seems it would have to be around 1939. Anyone with definitive a definitive date please pass it on to us.
                > >
                > > I hope others will take up your question Jason and help us all learn more about the subject of the glass used in vacpots. Steven has documented the glass used in the pots in his albums and the marks very exhaustively as have others. That is a great resource we already have to answer some of the questions on glass.
                > >
                > > Philip
                > >
                > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?
                > > >
                > > > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?
                > > >
                > > > Thanks,
                > > > Jason
                > > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Larry Hollenberg
                Philip, Thanks for that interesting run down on the McKee history. I have a number of baking things by them under all their names I think. I believe they were
                Message 7 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                  Philip,
                  Thanks for that interesting run down on the McKee history. I have a number of baking things by them under all their names I think. I believe they were the producers of the Flamex for sears and the Range Tec cookware trade names as well as  Glasbake.  There were probably many others but those are the ones I am familiar with. No doubt some of the other catalog companies relied on them for items also under their house brands? 
                  Larry

                  --- On Mon, 9/21/09, pb_petty <pbpetty@...> wrote:

                  From: pb_petty <pbpetty@...>
                  Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots
                  To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Monday, September 21, 2009, 9:36 AM













                   





                  In my research archive (not very big yet) I have the following info on McKee and Glasbake:



                  The McKee and Brothers Co began in 1853 in Pittsburgh, PA. In 1888 the company moved to a town that was ultimately named Jeannette (PA) for the wife of McKee's founder. In 1903 the company was renamed McKee Glass Co. and did business under that name until 1951 when they became a division of the Thatcher Glass Co. McKee Glass not only made items under its own name but also produced under the "Glasbake" name. In the late 1920's when the other glass houses were fully automated, McKee was still hand pressing its wares. This may be the reason that McKee focused their efforts on kitchen and oven glass instead of dinnerware lines. When the depression hit, it was the popularity of McKee's Glasbake line and opaque kitchenware that carried them through. McKee didn't introduce automatic production methods until the 1940's.. In 1961 Jeannette Glass Company bought the property and a variety of pressed glass items and ornamental tableware was manufactured there by
                  Jeannette until it closed in 1983.



                  Philip



                  --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, <rsburritt@. ..> wrote:

                  >

                  > A few weeks ago I was researching Glasbake and read somewhere that at one time McKee made 70% of all the glass in the US, both industrial and residential.

                  >

                  >

                  > ----- Original Message -----

                  > From: lobsterboy582000

                  > To: vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com

                  > Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2009 10:24 PM

                  > Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots

                  >

                  >

                  > I know that Pyrex is a trademark name for Corning- the heat resistant glass was developed originally for railroad lamps

                  >

                  > I Googled up Glasbake apparently made by McKee Glass Company of Pittsburgh

                  >

                  > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, "pb_petty" <pbpetty@> wrote:

                  > >

                  > > I am fascinated by the subject of who made the glass for whom at any point in time (for all vacpots.)

                  > >

                  > > In the Advertisements album I have posted a 1955 letter from Hellem which brags that Hellem is made with "Pyrex Glass." Prior to 1955 I have no idea who Hellem used. Perhaps others can fill in that gap in knowledge. The marks on my 10-cup Hellem do not indicate who made the glass. Neither do the instructions, the box or any of the materials that came with it.

                  > >

                  > > Hill-Shaw used at least two glass makers for their Vaculator glass models. My early Vaculator Junior with instructions has the glass marked as made by Glasbake for the Hill-Shaw Co. with the recognizable Glasbake shaped logo. I have an 8-cup Vaculator with a "comma-shaped" handle (Steven has nice photos of his in his Vaculator album) complete with WWII price control docs that has the glass etched with "Pyrex Brand Glassware made for the Hill-Shaw Co". The odd thing is that the Pyrex mark has been made to look very close to the Glasbake mark on my older Vaculator Junior to the extent of shaping the word "Glassware" to look like the Glasbake logo. A 12-cup vaculator I have which I believe dates from the 1940s is only marked 12UA and 12LA. I believe those are Pyrex marks (someone please correct me if I am wrong.) So when did Hill-Shaw change from Glasbake to Pyrex glass? Based on my pieces it seems it would have to be around 1939. Anyone with definitive
                  a definitive date please pass it on to us.

                  > >

                  > > I hope others will take up your question Jason and help us all learn more about the subject of the glass used in vacpots. Steven has documented the glass used in the pots in his albums and the marks very exhaustively as have others. That is a great resource we already have to answer some of the questions on glass.

                  > >

                  > > Philip

                  > >

                  > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@ > wrote:

                  > > >

                  > > > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?

                  > > >

                  > > > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?

                  > > >

                  > > > Thanks,

                  > > > Jason

                  > > >

                  > >

                  >

                  >

                  >

                  >

                  >

                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  >




































                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • nancy curtis
                  Besides producing the GLASBAKE line of kitchen glass, McKee also produced a line called FLAMEX which included both oven glass (their Hibiscus flower and
                  Message 8 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                    Besides producing the GLASBAKE line of kitchen glass, McKee
                    also produced a line called FLAMEX which included both oven
                    glass (their "Hibiscus" flower and leaves embossed line is one
                    of the most famous lines of oven glass) and stove-top glass. The
                    Hibiscus line was sold exclusively by Sears and Roebuck and the
                    larger pieces are marked with an "S" and an "R". In plain
                    and stippled glass pattern, McKee made FLAMEX several different
                    designs. They made glass skillets, with lids, and clip-on handles and
                    a Dutch oven. The larger skillet was called a "chicken fryer".
                    They made a drip style coffee pot with an upper and
                    lower glass chamber with a metal grounds basket and at least two sizes
                    of perk pots. There were also sauce pans and at least two sizes of
                    double boilers in the Flamex lines. McKee also made a line of stove top
                    class called "RANGE-TEC", which included two open skillets, one about 9" in
                    diameter and the other about 7" in diameter....both have applied glass handles.
                    There were also at least two sizes of RANGE-TEC saucepans.

                    An excellent place to see and read about these McKee lines is in a collector's
                    book called, "The Miracle in Grandmother's Kitchen", 1980, by Glyndon
                    Shirley. It has sections on PYREX, GLASBAKE, FLAMEX and a small section
                    on Fire King kitchen glass and FRY GLASS. It has a number reproduction
                    pages from Sear's catalogs from the 1930's and 40's that are very interesting.

                    Nancy C.
                    East Texas


                    In my research archive (not very big yet) I have the following info on McKee and Glasbake:

                    The McKee and Brothers Co began in 1853 in Pittsburgh, PA. In 1888 the company moved to a town that was ultimately named Jeannette (PA) for the wife of McKee's founder. In 1903 the company was renamed McKee Glass Co. and did business under that name until 1951 when they became a division of the Thatcher Glass Co. McKee Glass not only made items under its own name but also produced under the "Glasbake" name. In the late 1920's when the other glass houses were fully automated, McKee was still hand pressing its wares. This may be the reason that McKee focused their efforts on kitchen and oven glass instead of dinnerware lines. When the depression hit, it was the popularity of McKee's Glasbake line and opaque kitchenware that carried them through. McKee didn't introduce automatic production methods until the 1940's. In 1961 Jeannette Glass Company bought the property and a variety of pressed glass items and ornamental tableware was manufactured there by Jeannette until it closed in 1983.

                    Philip

                    --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > A few weeks ago I was researching Glasbake and read somewhere that at one time McKee made 70% of all the glass in the US, both industrial and residential.
                    >
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: lobsterboy582000
                    > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2009 10:24 PM
                    > Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots
                    >
                    >
                    > I know that Pyrex is a trademark name for Corning- the heat resistant glass was developed originally for railroad lamps
                    >
                    > I Googled up Glasbake apparently made by McKee Glass Company of Pittsburgh
                    >
                    > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "pb_petty" <pbpetty@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > I am fascinated by the subject of who made the glass for whom at any point in time (for all vacpots.)
                    > >
                    > > In the Advertisements album I have posted a 1955 letter from Hellem which brags that Hellem is made with "Pyrex Glass." Prior to 1955 I have no idea who Hellem used. Perhaps others can fill in that gap in knowledge. The marks on my 10-cup Hellem do not indicate who made the glass. Neither do the instructions, the box or any of the materials that came with it.
                    > >
                    > > Hill-Shaw used at least two glass makers for their Vaculator glass models. My early Vaculator Junior with instructions has the glass marked as made by Glasbake for the Hill-Shaw Co. with the recognizable Glasbake shaped logo. I have an 8-cup Vaculator with a "comma-shaped" handle (Steven has nice photos of his in his Vaculator album) complete with WWII price control docs that has the glass etched with "Pyrex Brand Glassware made for the Hill-Shaw Co". The odd thing is that the Pyrex mark has been made to look very close to the Glasbake mark on my older Vaculator Junior to the extent of shaping the word "Glassware" to look like the Glasbake logo. A 12-cup vaculator I have which I believe dates from the 1940s is only marked 12UA and 12LA. I believe those are Pyrex marks (someone please correct me if I am wrong.) So when did Hill-Shaw change from Glasbake to Pyrex glass? Based on my pieces it seems it would have to be around 1939. Anyone with definitive a definitive date please pass it on to us.
                    > >
                    > > I hope others will take up your question Jason and help us all learn more about the subject of the glass used in vacpots. Steven has documented the glass used in the pots in his albums and the marks very exhaustively as have others. That is a great resource we already have to answer some of the questions on glass.
                    > >
                    > > Philip
                    > >
                    > > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?
                    > > >
                    > > > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?
                    > > >
                    > > > Thanks,
                    > > > Jason
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • nancy curtis
                    But the patented PYREX name came about after Corning had already started making heat proof battery jars and lantern globes for the railroads. That name did
                    Message 9 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                      But the patented "PYREX" name came about after Corning had already
                      started making heat proof battery jars and lantern globes for the railroads.
                      That name did not come about until they discovered that the glass could
                      be used to bake in.....a cake first....in a cut down battery jar by Mrs. J. T.
                      Littleton, wife of one of Corning's young physicists who decided she wanted
                      to see if baking in the new glass would work. She got her husband to have
                      a battery jar cut down. He and a Dr. Taylor cut a jar down to a 6" height....
                      he took it home and the next day, after he had
                      left for work, she baked a cake in it and then took it to the plant so everyone
                      could see what a wonderful cake the new glass had produced. That was
                      the start of REAL Pyrex.

                      From The Miracle in Grandmother's Kitchen":

                      "According to records belonging to Dr. E. C. Sullivan, the first dish made of
                      heat-resistant glass for marketing was a pie plate. Therefore, when a name was
                      in question, the committee members were thinking in terms of a pie plate. Dr.
                      Churchill suggested the dish be called "Pie-right" or "Pie-kite" or "Pie-right". His
                      reason being the dish's ability to bake pie's so superbly, Someone else --- no
                      one is sure who --- proposed the name "Pyrex", reasoning it sounded better.
                      After a short discussion, the name "Pyrex" was unammimously accepted. According
                      to Dr. Sullivan's notes, the name "Pyrex" was agreed to on purely euphonious grounds.

                      The next step in the history of ovenware was taken when a leading home economist,
                      Mrs. Roarer, was asked by Corning to put their new product through some tests. Mrs.
                      Roarer was polite but unexcited about baking in glass. After her tests, she had a
                      complete attitude change and her reports were filled with praise and enthusiasm for the
                      new glass. Corning was now ready to bring their new product to the public.

                      The first Pyrex ware was demonstration was held in May of 1915, at a large department
                      store called Jordan Marsh, in Boston, Mass. The first day, 800 persons were present.
                      The second and third days, there was a heavy rain in the area, but still each day
                      there was a crowd of at least 500 present. Total sales for the three days was only $200.
                      The ladies who bought were inclined to try only one piece the first time around. The
                      large baking dish and the pie plate seemed to be the most popular items.

                      For many the thought of placing glass in a hot oven was unappealing. The chatter at
                      women's gatherings soon included firsthand pleasant experiences using Pyrex ovenware,
                      causing more and more ladies to ask for this ware at their favorite stores.

                      Homemakers were quick to recognize the many advantages of glass bakeware -- less dish
                      washing, the glass-retained heat keeping the food warm longer and the food looked more
                      attractive when served in the glass bakeware. Food cold be cooked, served, stored
                      and then reheated in the same container. The glass utensils were always in harmony
                      with the other tableware. Plus, if the manufacturer's care instructions were followed, the
                      glass ware could last a lifetime, retaining its original appearance. Yes, in 1915 a miracle
                      arrived in Grandmother's kitchen---Pyrex heat resistant glass."

                      McKee soon came out with it's own line of heat resistant glass.....Glasbake. It was first
                      introduced in 1917 but a problem with the patent made McKee pull it off the market and
                      reintroduce it in 1919. McKee Glass Co. made Glasbake until the company was sold in
                      1951 and became a part of Thatcher Glass. Then Thatcher Glass manufactured it, only some
                      in the older, original molds, until Thatcher sold out to Jeannette Glass Co. in 1961. Jeannette
                      continued to make it until they closed their doors in the mid 1980's. It isn't too hard to pick
                      out the Glasbake that was made by each of the three manufacturers as the style changed
                      with each of them. McKee's and Jeannette's the easiest to pick out.

                      I probably have enough Pyrex, Glasbake, Flamex and even Fire King kitchen glass to fill a
                      museum! I love old kitchen "anything" and it shows!!

                      Nancy C.
                      East Texas



                      I know that Pyrex is a trademark name for Corning- the heat resistant glass was developed originally for railroad lamps

                      I Googled up Glasbake apparently made by McKee Glass Company of Pittsburgh

                      --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "pb_petty" <pbpetty@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I am fascinated by the subject of who made the glass for whom at any point in time (for all vacpots.)
                      >
                      > In the Advertisements album I have posted a 1955 letter from Hellem which brags that Hellem is made with "Pyrex Glass." Prior to 1955 I have no idea who Hellem used. Perhaps others can fill in that gap in knowledge. The marks on my 10-cup Hellem do not indicate who made the glass. Neither do the instructions, the box or any of the materials that came with it.
                      >
                      > Hill-Shaw used at least two glass makers for their Vaculator glass models. My early Vaculator Junior with instructions has the glass marked as made by Glasbake for the Hill-Shaw Co. with the recognizable Glasbake shaped logo. I have an 8-cup Vaculator with a "comma-shaped" handle (Steven has nice photos of his in his Vaculator album) complete with WWII price control docs that has the glass etched with "Pyrex Brand Glassware made for the Hill-Shaw Co". The odd thing is that the Pyrex mark has been made to look very close to the Glasbake mark on my older Vaculator Junior to the extent of shaping the word "Glassware" to look like the Glasbake logo. A 12-cup vaculator I have which I believe dates from the 1940s is only marked 12UA and 12LA. I believe those are Pyrex marks (someone please correct me if I am wrong.) So when did Hill-Shaw change from Glasbake to Pyrex glass? Based on my pieces it seems it would have to be around 1939. Anyone with definitive a definitive date please pass it on to us.
                      >
                      > I hope others will take up your question Jason and help us all learn more about the subject of the glass used in vacpots. Steven has documented the glass used in the pots in his albums and the marks very exhaustively as have others. That is a great resource we already have to answer some of the questions on glass.
                      >
                      > Philip
                      >
                      > --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?
                      > >
                      > > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?
                      > >
                      > > Thanks,
                      > > Jason
                      > >
                      >





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Jason
                      There has been some truly awesome info coming through on the origins and evolution of Pyrex. Perhaps someone can answer me this: I have always been under the
                      Message 10 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                        There has been some truly awesome info coming through on the origins and evolution of Pyrex.

                        Perhaps someone can answer me this: I have always been under the assumption that Pyrex, besides being heat resistant, was more impact resistant than "normal" glass. That is one reason that I am looking at a Pyrex vac pot. My Yamas are very fragile. So far I have broken one bottom on my 5 cup stove top, 2 top funnels on my 5 cup stove top, and one funnel on my 8 cup stove top. I wash them right after using them and I am very gentle, but it seems the slightest bump results in cracks or breakage.

                        I don't as of yet own a vintage glass vac pot, but I am told the glass is thicker. Could this mean that they are sturdier because of their construction or does the type a glass also have an impact (pun intended) on a pot's durability?

                        Jason

                        --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?
                        >
                        > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?
                        >
                        > Thanks,
                        > Jason
                        >
                      • Larry Hollenberg
                        Jason, Unfortunately I have found old pots break quite easily if mishandled.  Maybe not quite as easily as a new pot, some of which as you say use extremely
                        Message 11 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                          Jason,
                          Unfortunately I have found old pots break quite easily if mishandled.  Maybe not quite as easily as a new pot, some of which as you say use extremely thin glass.  I have broken a number of tops by hitting them against the sink spout or edge of the sink.  I will say that the commercial type silex I have I bounced off the floor by accident one day and to my amazement it didn't phase it.  
                          If your really concerned about breakage and want a non electric then I would get the stainless steel corys.  They take a bit of getting used to due to wanting to raise the water faster than a glass one, but once you figure them out they can be very reliable. 
                          Larry
                          --- On Mon, 9/21/09, Jason <headchangestudio@...> wrote:

                          From: Jason <headchangestudio@...>
                          Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots
                          To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Monday, September 21, 2009, 5:22 PM













                           





                          There has been some truly awesome info coming through on the origins and evolution of Pyrex.



                          Perhaps someone can answer me this: I have always been under the assumption that Pyrex, besides being heat resistant, was more impact resistant than "normal" glass. That is one reason that I am looking at a Pyrex vac pot. My Yamas are very fragile. So far I have broken one bottom on my 5 cup stove top, 2 top funnels on my 5 cup stove top, and one funnel on my 8 cup stove top. I wash them right after using them and I am very gentle, but it seems the slightest bump results in cracks or breakage.



                          I don't as of yet own a vintage glass vac pot, but I am told the glass is thicker. Could this mean that they are sturdier because of their construction or does the type a glass also have an impact (pun intended) on a pot's durability?



                          Jason



                          --- In vacuumcoffeepotcoll ector@yahoogroup s.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@ ...> wrote:

                          >

                          > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?

                          >

                          > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?

                          >

                          > Thanks,

                          > Jason

                          >




































                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • rsburritt@gmail.com
                          Older Pyrex was borosilicate glass, made with boron oxide and silica, whereas newer Pyrex (and many other types of older glass) are Lime glass, predominantly
                          Message 12 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                            Older Pyrex was borosilicate glass, made with boron oxide and silica, whereas newer Pyrex (and many other types of older glass) are Lime glass, predominantly sodium carbonate and limestone with the silica but without the boron that gives it the heat resistant/shock resistant properties (even though both types can be "tempered"). Borosilicate glass has the hue of vaseline to it and it is much stronger, but much more expensive to produce, which is why it is not widely offered for most things anymore.

                            If you look that up online you will understand better the differences and then you can ask further questions if you need to.

                            Pyrex in the US is no longer made with Borosilicate glass, which is why the stuff you buy today is crappy. But according to a source I read, the Pyrex made in France, which is a separate division, is still Borosilicate. Also, I suspect that US EPA may have had something to do with it, but I'm not sure. The cost of cleanups can make production very expensive, which is why some things made in China are still gross pollutants, but not subject to the US EPA (even though the air pollution blows across the ocean and we breathe it anyway...and they still dump the toxins into the oceans, which we eat the fish out of. So is it really a win-win scenario?? Not really.)

                            Roland


                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: Jason
                            To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Monday, September 21, 2009 4:22 PM
                            Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots


                            There has been some truly awesome info coming through on the origins and evolution of Pyrex.

                            Perhaps someone can answer me this: I have always been under the assumption that Pyrex, besides being heat resistant, was more impact resistant than "normal" glass. That is one reason that I am looking at a Pyrex vac pot. My Yamas are very fragile. So far I have broken one bottom on my 5 cup stove top, 2 top funnels on my 5 cup stove top, and one funnel on my 8 cup stove top. I wash them right after using them and I am very gentle, but it seems the slightest bump results in cracks or breakage.

                            I don't as of yet own a vintage glass vac pot, but I am told the glass is thicker. Could this mean that they are sturdier because of their construction or does the type a glass also have an impact (pun intended) on a pot's durability?

                            Jason

                            --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?
                            >
                            > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?
                            >
                            > Thanks,
                            > Jason
                            >





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Jason
                            ... Larry, I actually own 2 Cory SS pots. That s the extent of my vintage collection :-} Jason
                            Message 13 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                              --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
                              Larry,

                              I actually own 2 Cory SS pots. That's the extent of my vintage collection :-}

                              Jason

                              >
                              >
                              > Jason,
                              > Unfortunately I have found old pots break quite easily if mishandled.  Maybe not quite as easily as a new pot, some of which as you say use extremely thin glass.  I have broken a number of tops by hitting them against the sink spout or edge of the sink.  I will say that the commercial type silex I have I bounced off the floor by accident one day and to my amazement it didn't phase it.  
                              > If your really concerned about breakage and want a non electric then I would get the stainless steel corys.  They take a bit of getting used to due to wanting to raise the water faster than a glass one, but once you figure them out they can be very reliable. 
                              > Larry
                              > --- On Mon, 9/21/09, Jason <headchangestudio@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > From: Jason <headchangestudio@...>
                              > Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots
                              > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                              > Date: Monday, September 21, 2009, 5:22 PM
                            • Jason
                              My Bodum double wall thermal cups are made from borosilicate glass. Do you know when they stopped making borosilicate glass vac pots or can you tell me which
                              Message 14 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                                My Bodum double wall thermal cups are made from borosilicate glass.

                                Do you know when they stopped making borosilicate glass vac pots or can you tell me which vac pots were made borosilicate glass?

                                Jason

                                --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Older Pyrex was borosilicate glass, made with boron oxide and silica, whereas newer Pyrex (and many other types of older glass) are Lime glass, predominantly sodium carbonate and limestone with the silica but without the boron that gives it the heat resistant/shock resistant properties (even though both types can be "tempered"). Borosilicate glass has the hue of vaseline to it and it is much stronger, but much more expensive to produce, which is why it is not widely offered for most things anymore.
                                >
                                > If you look that up online you will understand better the differences and then you can ask further questions if you need to.
                                >
                                > Pyrex in the US is no longer made with Borosilicate glass, which is why the stuff you buy today is crappy. But according to a source I read, the Pyrex made in France, which is a separate division, is still Borosilicate. Also, I suspect that US EPA may have had something to do with it, but I'm not sure. The cost of cleanups can make production very expensive, which is why some things made in China are still gross pollutants, but not subject to the US EPA (even though the air pollution blows across the ocean and we breathe it anyway...and they still dump the toxins into the oceans, which we eat the fish out of. So is it really a win-win scenario?? Not really.)
                                >
                                > Roland
                                >
                                >
                                > ----- Original Message -----
                                > From: Jason
                                > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                > Sent: Monday, September 21, 2009 4:22 PM
                                > Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots
                              • rsburritt@gmail.com
                                Any vintage vacpot you buy is likely going to be borosilicate. But keep in mind...borosilicate or not...glass is still glass is still glass. It has a normal
                                Message 15 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                                  Any vintage vacpot you buy is likely going to be borosilicate.
                                  But keep in mind...borosilicate or not...glass is still glass is still glass.
                                  It has a normal life expectancy just like anything else.
                                  Enough times of the normal expansion and contraction from heating and cooling takes its toll.
                                  Also, scratches on the bottom of anything glass (tempered or not, borosilicate or not) have a weakening effect. Remember that to cut glass, they score it first. Essentially, scoring is a deep scratch.

                                  I'm surprised to hear that the Bodum thermal cups are borosilicate, since they are so fragile. Have you checked with Bodum to see if their Santos glass vacpot is borosilicate?


                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Jason
                                  To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Monday, September 21, 2009 6:24 PM
                                  Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots


                                  My Bodum double wall thermal cups are made from borosilicate glass.

                                  Do you know when they stopped making borosilicate glass vac pots or can you tell me which vac pots were made borosilicate glass?

                                  Jason

                                  --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, <rsburritt@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Older Pyrex was borosilicate glass, made with boron oxide and silica, whereas newer Pyrex (and many other types of older glass) are Lime glass, predominantly sodium carbonate and limestone with the silica but without the boron that gives it the heat resistant/shock resistant properties (even though both types can be "tempered"). Borosilicate glass has the hue of vaseline to it and it is much stronger, but much more expensive to produce, which is why it is not widely offered for most things anymore.
                                  >
                                  > If you look that up online you will understand better the differences and then you can ask further questions if you need to.
                                  >
                                  > Pyrex in the US is no longer made with Borosilicate glass, which is why the stuff you buy today is crappy. But according to a source I read, the Pyrex made in France, which is a separate division, is still Borosilicate. Also, I suspect that US EPA may have had something to do with it, but I'm not sure. The cost of cleanups can make production very expensive, which is why some things made in China are still gross pollutants, but not subject to the US EPA (even though the air pollution blows across the ocean and we breathe it anyway...and they still dump the toxins into the oceans, which we eat the fish out of. So is it really a win-win scenario?? Not really.)
                                  >
                                  > Roland
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ----- Original Message -----
                                  > From: Jason
                                  > To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                  > Sent: Monday, September 21, 2009 4:22 PM
                                  > Subject: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots





                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • nancy curtis
                                  Hi Jason....... So far, I have never broken or cracked any of my vac pots, Pyrex or any other brand, but, I am extremely careful when I use them too. It is
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                                    Hi Jason.......
                                    So far, I have never broken or cracked any of my vac pots, Pyrex or any other brand,
                                    but, I am extremely careful when I use them too. It is awfully thin glass compared to other
                                    Pyrex kitchen glass. I wish I could tell you that if you bump a upper or lower chamber that
                                    it woudn't break but I just don't know. I would be REAL careful if you don't want to crack or
                                    break another one.

                                    I have hundreds of pieces of vintage Pyrex and vintage McKee glass (all lines) but I am
                                    really careful with all of it too. Took me years and years to collect it all and LOTS of
                                    money......I am VERY careful using all of it.
                                    Nancy C.
                                    East Texas


                                    There has been some truly awesome info coming through on the origins and evolution of Pyrex.

                                    Perhaps someone can answer me this: I have always been under the assumption that Pyrex, besides being heat resistant, was more impact resistant than "normal" glass. That is one reason that I am looking at a Pyrex vac pot. My Yamas are very fragile. So far I have broken one bottom on my 5 cup stove top, 2 top funnels on my 5 cup stove top, and one funnel on my 8 cup stove top. I wash them right after using them and I am very gentle, but it seems the slightest bump results in cracks or breakage.

                                    I don't as of yet own a vintage glass vac pot, but I am told the glass is thicker. Could this mean that they are sturdier because of their construction or does the type a glass also have an impact (pun intended) on a pot's durability?

                                    Jason

                                    --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?
                                    >
                                    > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?
                                    >
                                    > Thanks,
                                    > Jason
                                    >





                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • rsburritt@gmail.com
                                    Jason if you want glass pots for daily drivers just get a few Cory Plain Jane basic pots, the kind with no decoration, no lid on the lower, they are abundant
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Sep 21, 2009
                                      Jason if you want glass pots for daily drivers just get a few Cory Plain Jane basic pots, the kind with no decoration, no lid on the lower, they are abundant and easy to find replacements for, pick up 2 or 3 of them and believe it or not if you have a dish washer just wash them in the dishwasher (but not the gasket). Forget about preserving the bakelite handle, there are always going to be a supply of them as well from pots that break. Less chance of breaking them by washing them in the dishwasher. So just buy a few and know that you will sacrifice them. Roland

                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: nancy curtis
                                      To: vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Monday, September 21, 2009 11:20 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [vacpot] Re: Pyrex Vac Pots



                                      Hi Jason.......
                                      So far, I have never broken or cracked any of my vac pots, Pyrex or any other brand,
                                      but, I am extremely careful when I use them too. It is awfully thin glass compared to other
                                      Pyrex kitchen glass. I wish I could tell you that if you bump a upper or lower chamber that
                                      it woudn't break but I just don't know. I would be REAL careful if you don't want to crack or
                                      break another one.

                                      I have hundreds of pieces of vintage Pyrex and vintage McKee glass (all lines) but I am
                                      really careful with all of it too. Took me years and years to collect it all and LOTS of
                                      money......I am VERY careful using all of it.
                                      Nancy C.
                                      East Texas

                                      There has been some truly awesome info coming through on the origins and evolution of Pyrex.

                                      Perhaps someone can answer me this: I have always been under the assumption that Pyrex, besides being heat resistant, was more impact resistant than "normal" glass. That is one reason that I am looking at a Pyrex vac pot. My Yamas are very fragile. So far I have broken one bottom on my 5 cup stove top, 2 top funnels on my 5 cup stove top, and one funnel on my 8 cup stove top. I wash them right after using them and I am very gentle, but it seems the slightest bump results in cracks or breakage.

                                      I don't as of yet own a vintage glass vac pot, but I am told the glass is thicker. Could this mean that they are sturdier because of their construction or does the type a glass also have an impact (pun intended) on a pot's durability?

                                      Jason

                                      --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "heacdchange" <headchangestudio@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Are all Silex pots made from Pyrex?
                                      >
                                      > What other manufacturers offer Pyrex vac pots?
                                      >
                                      > Thanks,
                                      > Jason
                                      >

                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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