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Silex EC-8, 115 Pedestal Style Stove.

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  • larry hollenberg
    Hi all, I have a little kitchen type narrow neck silex coffee maker here with burgandy, or maroon, colored trim, which may have been considered red at one
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 9, 2007
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      Hi all,

      I have a little kitchen type narrow neck silex coffee maker here with burgandy, or maroon,
      colored trim, which may have been considered red at one time? At any rate I had never
      experimented with the pot due to a cracked lower pot. But when the other day I decided to
      clean it up and replace the lower pot I made a couple interesting observations.
      One is that a few parts of the bakealite trim were really dull and no longer matched the
      others well. I decided nothing lost to try some oxblood shoe polish on it.. Well the result
      was the dull parts now match the rest and you would never know it was done.
      The second has to do with the little Pesdestal type stove it came with. Its the one where
      the bowl is evidently held up by the outer rim, rather than the bowl resting on the ceramic
      part of the stove. It has little decorative cut outs in the metal between the elements and
      the pot. That must be designed to cool off the stove rapidly. As we have had many
      discussion about how the stove cools too slowly to let them remain on the unit and return
      the coffee. To my surprise when I first tried it I unplugged it just as it got almost all the
      water too the top. Usually a stove will then proceed to brew and usually for a lot longer
      than most wish. Not this one, it quickly returned the water and didn't brew as expected..
      That was a first for me. So the next time I let it go for 30 seconds or so thinking maybe it
      just didn't have enought built up heat to keep it going the first time. Same thing, down it
      went.. I have come to find that its the only stove I know of so far that returns the water as
      you unplugg it without over cooking. I suppose the little air holes and the fact that the
      burner isn't directly against the bowl is the secret. Now its is my favorite, except that they
      don't have a low heat selection. But coffee does stay pretty hot on it for quite some time
      as it is.
      Fun to discover something new now and then.

      Larry
    • Ron
      Hi Larry, We haven t tried to do much with bakelite trim except clean it *very* gently. We found auto polish to be useful. Glad you had good results with the
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 10, 2007
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        Hi Larry,

        We haven't tried to do much with bakelite trim except clean it *very*
        gently. We found auto polish to be useful.

        Glad you had good results with the Silex pedestal stove. We have 2
        Cory stoves, a Silex stove, and a Sunbeam stove. We haven't actually
        tried the Sunbeam stove since we got it not long ago. We think it was
        used with one of the all-glass Sunbeam vacpots. We don't have one of
        those and haven't yet determined which of our vacpots would work with
        it. Only the two Cory stoves have a lower setting, but we've learned
        that even the lower setting is too hot for trying to keep the coffee
        warm. Whenever we use one of the stoves, we remove the vacpot from it
        when the coffee has brewed long enough. To keep the glass vacpots
        warm, we use either the Pyrex warmer, the Cory warmer, or one of the
        smaller Salton Hotrays. We also use the warmers for a few all-metal,
        non-electric vacpots that we have (Nicro, Kromex). We don't keep
        *any* of our non-electric pots warm on the range.

        --- In vacuumcoffeepotcollector@yahoogroups.com, "larry hollenberg"
        <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi all,
        >
        > I have a little kitchen type narrow neck silex coffee maker here
        with burgandy, or maroon,
        > colored trim, which may have been considered red at one time? At
        any rate I had never
        > experimented with the pot due to a cracked lower pot. But when the
        other day I decided to
        > clean it up and replace the lower pot I made a couple interesting
        observations.
        > One is that a few parts of the bakealite trim were really dull and
        no longer matched the
        > others well. I decided nothing lost to try some oxblood shoe
        polish on it.. Well the result
        > was the dull parts now match the rest and you would never know it
        was done.
        > The second has to do with the little Pesdestal type stove it came
        with. Its the one where
        > the bowl is evidently held up by the outer rim, rather than the
        bowl resting on the ceramic
        > part of the stove. It has little decorative cut outs in the metal
        between the elements and
        > the pot. That must be designed to cool off the stove rapidly. As
        we have had many
        > discussion about how the stove cools too slowly to let them remain
        on the unit and return
        > the coffee. To my surprise when I first tried it I unplugged it
        just as it got almost all the
        > water too the top. Usually a stove will then proceed to brew and
        usually for a lot longer
        > than most wish. Not this one, it quickly returned the water and
        didn't brew as expected..
        > That was a first for me. So the next time I let it go for 30
        seconds or so thinking maybe it
        > just didn't have enought built up heat to keep it going the first
        time. Same thing, down it
        > went.. I have come to find that its the only stove I know of so far
        that returns the water as
        > you unplugg it without over cooking. I suppose the little air
        holes and the fact that the
        > burner isn't directly against the bowl is the secret. Now its is
        my favorite, except that they
        > don't have a low heat selection. But coffee does stay pretty hot
        on it for quite some time
        > as it is.
        > Fun to discover something new now and then.
        >
        > Larry
        >
      • vacpotaddict
        Larry, This is in response to your recent post about the bakelite piece that you used shoe polish on to shine it up. Bakelite is a primitive petroleum product
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 13, 2007
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          Larry,

          This is in response to your recent post about the bakelite piece that
          you used shoe polish on to shine it up.

          Bakelite is a primitive petroleum product and the shiny exterior is a
          product of the molding process. Over the years people use harsh
          chemicals and abrasives that break down the glazed surface and no
          amount of polishing will restore it 100%. The surface becomes porous
          and will look dull. By using shoe polish, which is generally
          petroleum based you are doing the same thing as wetting a rock... it
          makes it look richer in color and appear shiny.

          You should clean bakelite with a mild detergent, nothing that contains
          ammonia or other chemicals that will strip the oils from the material
          causing it to dry out. Some of the best polishes on the market for
          bakelite are the Novus line. You won't be able to get it back to
          "original" but with some elbow grease you can get a nice shine back.
          Once you have the surface smooth and shiny again you can use a good,
          quality wax like Mothers carnauba which will help with the shine and
          also help bead the water away.


          Dave
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