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[ustav] Re: Forgiveness Sunday

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  • Carles, Trevor
    From Deacon James Carles Sydney/Australia We actually do this every Sunday evening at Vespers during Great Lent. We begin the service as usual, vested in
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 28, 1999
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      From Deacon James Carles
      Sydney/Australia

      We actually do this every Sunday evening at Vespers during Great Lent.
      We begin the service as usual, vested in purple - our Saturday/Sunday
      colour during the fast - and with the deacon intoning the Great Litany.
      During "Vouchsafe, O Lord..." (read slowly, as Br Isaac notes) certain
      people out in the body of the church slip off the purple analoy covers
      which had simply been placed over the weekday black. In the altar, the
      clergy and servers also change to black vestments. The priest simply
      puts on a black epitrachelion and goes out onto the amvon & intones the
      final litanies (not the deacon), to which the choir responds in a lenten
      melody. We don't change the altar vestments at this time - there is not
      the time to do so. The change has the same striking effect every week
      of leading us back into a more solemn observation of the fast. As an
      aside, in our parish (& a number of others in Sydney) we serve the
      "Passia" on each of the first four Sundays of Lent. This is a whole
      topic in itself - do others have this tradition? (I believe it to be
      Western Ukrainian in origin).

      Deacon James

      -----Original Message-----
      From: ilector [SMTP:ilector@...]
      Sent: Sunday, 28 February 1999 5:23
      To: ustav@egroups.com
      Subject: [ustav] Re: Forgiveness Sunday

      Dear Daniel,

      Here at Synod, and in other places I have been, the coverings and
      hangings are indeed changed during "Vouchsafe, O Lord..." at Forgiveness
      Vespers. And it does provide as striking an effect as the change from
      dark to light vestments on Great Saturday. This effect is enhanced
      further by the fact that the choir uses the lenten melody for "Lord,
      have mercy" for the first time at the ektenia immediately following
      "Vouchsafe, O Lord", which the change of vestments is being completed.

      The process, as I have observed it, is as follows: At some point before
      the Vespers service ( maybe during Cheese Week) the people usually in
      charge of the vestments and coverings remove all such cloths from the
      analogia and wherever they are found in the church (the subdeacons and
      deacons do the same within the sanctuary). Somber coverings (here at
      Synod, black; in other places, purple) are then put on, which are
      immediately covered over with light coverings (here, gold is used).
      When "Vouchsafe, O Lord" is due to start, designated persons are already
      in position before the analogia and elsewhere. As the prayer begins,
      they pick up the icons, etc., remove the bright-colored coverings, thus
      exposing the somber coverings underneath, and replace the icons. The
      bright-colored coverings are collected and borne off to the vestry,
      until needed again.

      How the functionaries within the sanctuary handle the altar-table, table
      of oblation and veil I am not in a position to see. I think the dark
      veil is mounted on the rod "behind" the light-colored veil, and at
      "Vouchsafe, O Lord" the light-colored veil is slipped off one end of the
      rod, while the dark one is pulled across in its place.

      It goes without saying that when all this is being done the reader who
      recites "Vouchsafe, O Lord" should do so in as protracted a manner as
      possible (without taking it to ludicrous extremes), so as to give the
      people the time they need to accomplish the change.

      Yours in Christ,

      Isaac Lambertsen.


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    • ilector
      Dear Father James, A counterpart of the Passia is served in a number of the Synod s parishes in Pennsylvania. The parishioners of those churches are
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 1, 1999
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        Dear Father James,

        A counterpart of the Passia is served in a number of the Synod's
        parishes in Pennsylvania. The parishioners of those churches are
        predominantly of Galician, Lemko and Carpatho-Russian descent, and the
        practice of serving Passia is apparently a holdover from their native
        lands.

        I vaguely recall that St. Dimitri of Rostov introduced the Orthodox
        version of Passia in the western borderlands, to coöpt the popularity of
        similar sorts of lenten devotional services performed by non-Orthodox
        clergy.

        Yours in Christ,

        Isaac Lambertsen.


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      • Michael Malloy
        Dear friends on the Ustav list - I know I have offended many of you with my flippant remarks over the past few months. My passions were most notably out of
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 12, 2000
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          Dear friends on the Ustav list -

          I know I have offended many of you with my flippant remarks over the past
          few months.

          My passions were most notably out of control a few weeks ago as I grieved
          the loss of music in my worship.

          Please, forgive me.

          Michael Malloy (Not related to anybody named Mallory)

          Prove me, O God, and know my heart;
          examine me and know my paths.
          And see if the way of iniquity be in me,
          and guide me in the way everlasting.

          - Psalm 139:23-24

          "Blazhen muzh, izhe nye ide na sovyet nechestivykh..."
          - Psalm 1
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          Michael Malloy (malloy.2@...) (614) 292-2319
          Ohio State University Libraries
          Music and Dance Library - Room 166 Sullivant Hall
          1813 North High Street, Columbus OH 43210
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        • Elizabeth Riggs
          Forgive me, my Brothers-and-Sisters-in-Christ, for anything I have said, left unsaid, done, left undone, thought, did not think that may have offended you or
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 13, 2005
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            Forgive me, my Brothers-and-Sisters-in-Christ, for anything I have
            said, left unsaid, done, left undone, thought, did not think that
            may have offended you or led you astray!

            Let us set out with joy upon the season of the Fast, and prepare
            ourselves for spiritual combat. Let us purify our soul and cleanse
            our flesh; and as we fast from food, let us abstain also from every
            passion. Rejoicing in the virtues of the Spirit, may we persevere
            with love, and so be counted worthy to see the solemn Passion of
            Christ our God, and with great spiritual gladness, to behold his
            Passover.
            (From the Vespers of Forgiveness Sunday)

            May we all have a fruitful Lenten Season, and see the Risen Christ
            on Pascha!

            With Love in Christ,
            Elizabeth, the sinner
            and Perennial Student
          • James Morgan
            As Great Lent begins, I wish to ask the forgiveness of anyone on this list whom I might have offended during the past year. May God have mercy on all of us and
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 13, 2005
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              As Great Lent begins, I wish to ask the forgiveness of anyone on this list
              whom I might have offended during the past year.

              May God have mercy on all of us and guide our path to the Holy Pascha.

              Rdr. James Morgan
              Olympia, WA
            • subdeaconmichaelastley
              This is a beautiful custom, and one that has heretofore been unknown at my parish. I m glad that I stumbled upon this while looking for something else. May I
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 25, 2013
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                This is a beautiful custom, and one that has heretofore been unknown at my parish.

                I'm glad that I stumbled upon this while looking for something else.

                May I ask: does it apply to the vestments of the clergy as well as the paraments?

                Many thanks.

                Michael

                --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel Olson" <daniellector@...> wrote:
                >
                > I would like to offer the following observations regarding Forgiveness
                > Sunday and the Rite of Forgiveness.
                >
                > It is interesting to note that the name "Forgiveness Sunday" does not
                > appear in the church service books. The title that does appear is
                > "Cheesefare Sunday, the Expulsion of Adam."
                >
                > In the service for Cheesefare Sunday, the theme of forgiveness is
                > notably absent. Almost all the liturgical texts deal with the expulsion
                > of Adam, while a few deal with the approaching Lenten struggle. There
                > is also no reference to forgiveness in the texts of the Vespers service
                > on Cheesefare Sunday evening.
                >
                > The theme of forgiveness is, of course, prominent in the Gospel lesson
                > for Cheesefare Sunday (Matt. 6;14-21). It is perhaps from this Gospel
                > reading that the popular designation "Forgiveness Sunday" is derived. It
                > is also quite likely that this popular designation is related to the
                > universal practice of asking for forgiveness on this day at the onset of
                > Great Lent.
                >
                > It is curious that there is no mention in the Typicon of the exchange of
                > forgiveness on Cheesefare Sunday. This omission seems all the more
                > unusual because it apparently was the custom in the Palestinian
                > monasteries to ask for forgiveness at the beginning of Great Lent. For
                > example, in the life of St. Mary of Egypt there is the following
                > passage: "The all gathered in church, and after praying earnestly with
                > prostrations, the elders kissed one another and asked forgivenesss."
                >
                > The Typicon does prescribe the asking of forgiveness, but it is
                > appointed at a much later time -- on Wednesday of Passion Week at the
                > end of the Hours and the Typica. The passage in the Typicon reads as
                > follows: "And instead of the dismissal, the superior says 'O Master
                > plenteous in mercy...,' the whole prayer to the end. While this said,
                > we, falling down to the ground, pray. And after its completion, when we
                > have stood up, he [the superior] himself bows to the brethren and asks
                > forgiveness, saying: 'Bless [me] holy fathers and forgive me a sinner
                > wherein I have sinned throughout my life, and throughout the holy forty
                > days, in word, deed, thought and in all my senses.' And the brethren
                > answer: 'May God forgive thee, venerable father.' Then the brethren
                > come up two by two, and they too similarly ask for forgiveness saying:
                > 'Forgive me, holy father,' and the rest as written above. And receiving
                > forgiveness, we go to our cells and are silent until the vesper hour."
                >
                > Since there is no mention in the Typicon about what should be sung
                > during the exchange of forgiveness, this seems to be a matter of local
                > custom, and, apparently, practices vary widely from place to place. I
                > have most often encountered the singing of paschal hymns -- either the
                > irmosi of the paschal canon or the paschal stichera.
                >
                > It seems to me that the paschal stichera are quite appropriate for
                > Forgiveness Sunday, not only in their capacity as paschal hymns, but
                > also because in the final sticheron the theme of forgiveness is taken up
                > rather strikingly: "And let us embrace one another. Let us say, 'O
                > brethren,' even to them that hate us: let us forgive all things on the
                > Resurrection..."
                >
                > One thing that I find somewhat incongruous is the practice of ending the
                > final paschal sticheron at the words "and thus let us cry," and then
                > omitting the words of the paschal hymn "Christ is risen from the
                > dead..." It hardly makes sense to sing "and thus let us cry" and then
                > not cry out anything at all. If one is going to sing any of the hymns
                > that are specifically paschal, there is no logical reason not to sing
                > "Christ is risen from the dead..," which is an integral part of the
                > sticheron.
                >
                > As far as the manner of singing the paschal hymns is concerned, I think
                > that they should be sung in a natural, joyful way. Perhaps it is not
                > necessary to sing them quite as exhuberantly as on Pascha itself, but it
                > also is not necessary to change their inherent nature by singing them
                > too softly, too slowly, or "penitentially."
                >
                > A note in "The Lenten Triodion" states that at "Vouchsafe, O Lord..." in
                > the Vespers on Forgiveness Sunday, "the covers on the ikon-stands and
                > the other hangings in the church are...changed." Unfortunately, I have
                > not seen this in practice, since usually the hangings have been changed
                > before the service begins. This is a pity. I'm sure that such a
                > practice would have just as striking an effect as the change from dark
                > to light vestments has on Great Saturday.
                >
                > Finally, in one of the postings concerning the Rite of Forgiveness, it
                > was mentioned that in one parish the various invocations of the saints
                > were sung after the paschal stichera, as is done "in Jordanville." One
                > should keep in mind that the invocation of the saints is done in
                > Jordanville because the Rite of Forgiveness is performed there not after
                > Vespers but after Compline, and the invocation of the saints is always
                > done in Jordanville at the end of Compline. There is no inherent
                > connection between the invocation of the saints and the Vespers of
                > Cheesefare Sunday or the Rite of Forgiveness.
                >
                > Daniel Olson
                >
                >
                > ______________________________________________________
                >
                > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                > eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/ustav
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                >
              • S. Miller
                The clergy also change from light to dark. dn. Sergius
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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                  The clergy also change from light to dark.

                  dn. Sergius


                  --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "subdeaconmichaelastley" <subdeaconmichael@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > This is a beautiful custom, and one that has heretofore been unknown at my parish.
                  >
                  > I'm glad that I stumbled upon this while looking for something else.
                  >
                  > May I ask: does it apply to the vestments of the clergy as well as the paraments?
                  >
                  > Many thanks.
                  >
                  > Michael
                  >
                  > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel Olson" <daniellector@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I would like to offer the following observations regarding Forgiveness
                  > > Sunday and the Rite of Forgiveness.
                  > >
                  > > It is interesting to note that the name "Forgiveness Sunday" does not
                  > > appear in the church service books. The title that does appear is
                  > > "Cheesefare Sunday, the Expulsion of Adam."
                  > >
                  > > In the service for Cheesefare Sunday, the theme of forgiveness is
                  > > notably absent. Almost all the liturgical texts deal with the expulsion
                  > > of Adam, while a few deal with the approaching Lenten struggle. There
                  > > is also no reference to forgiveness in the texts of the Vespers service
                  > > on Cheesefare Sunday evening.
                  > >
                  > > The theme of forgiveness is, of course, prominent in the Gospel lesson
                  > > for Cheesefare Sunday (Matt. 6;14-21). It is perhaps from this Gospel
                  > > reading that the popular designation "Forgiveness Sunday" is derived. It
                  > > is also quite likely that this popular designation is related to the
                  > > universal practice of asking for forgiveness on this day at the onset of
                  > > Great Lent.
                  > >
                  > > It is curious that there is no mention in the Typicon of the exchange of
                  > > forgiveness on Cheesefare Sunday. This omission seems all the more
                  > > unusual because it apparently was the custom in the Palestinian
                  > > monasteries to ask for forgiveness at the beginning of Great Lent. For
                  > > example, in the life of St. Mary of Egypt there is the following
                  > > passage: "The all gathered in church, and after praying earnestly with
                  > > prostrations, the elders kissed one another and asked forgivenesss."
                  > >
                  > > The Typicon does prescribe the asking of forgiveness, but it is
                  > > appointed at a much later time -- on Wednesday of Passion Week at the
                  > > end of the Hours and the Typica. The passage in the Typicon reads as
                  > > follows: "And instead of the dismissal, the superior says 'O Master
                  > > plenteous in mercy...,' the whole prayer to the end. While this said,
                  > > we, falling down to the ground, pray. And after its completion, when we
                  > > have stood up, he [the superior] himself bows to the brethren and asks
                  > > forgiveness, saying: 'Bless [me] holy fathers and forgive me a sinner
                  > > wherein I have sinned throughout my life, and throughout the holy forty
                  > > days, in word, deed, thought and in all my senses.' And the brethren
                  > > answer: 'May God forgive thee, venerable father.' Then the brethren
                  > > come up two by two, and they too similarly ask for forgiveness saying:
                  > > 'Forgive me, holy father,' and the rest as written above. And receiving
                  > > forgiveness, we go to our cells and are silent until the vesper hour."
                  > >
                  > > Since there is no mention in the Typicon about what should be sung
                  > > during the exchange of forgiveness, this seems to be a matter of local
                  > > custom, and, apparently, practices vary widely from place to place. I
                  > > have most often encountered the singing of paschal hymns -- either the
                  > > irmosi of the paschal canon or the paschal stichera.
                  > >
                  > > It seems to me that the paschal stichera are quite appropriate for
                  > > Forgiveness Sunday, not only in their capacity as paschal hymns, but
                  > > also because in the final sticheron the theme of forgiveness is taken up
                  > > rather strikingly: "And let us embrace one another. Let us say, 'O
                  > > brethren,' even to them that hate us: let us forgive all things on the
                  > > Resurrection..."
                  > >
                  > > One thing that I find somewhat incongruous is the practice of ending the
                  > > final paschal sticheron at the words "and thus let us cry," and then
                  > > omitting the words of the paschal hymn "Christ is risen from the
                  > > dead..." It hardly makes sense to sing "and thus let us cry" and then
                  > > not cry out anything at all. If one is going to sing any of the hymns
                  > > that are specifically paschal, there is no logical reason not to sing
                  > > "Christ is risen from the dead..," which is an integral part of the
                  > > sticheron.
                  > >
                  > > As far as the manner of singing the paschal hymns is concerned, I think
                  > > that they should be sung in a natural, joyful way. Perhaps it is not
                  > > necessary to sing them quite as exhuberantly as on Pascha itself, but it
                  > > also is not necessary to change their inherent nature by singing them
                  > > too softly, too slowly, or "penitentially."
                  > >
                  > > A note in "The Lenten Triodion" states that at "Vouchsafe, O Lord..." in
                  > > the Vespers on Forgiveness Sunday, "the covers on the ikon-stands and
                  > > the other hangings in the church are...changed." Unfortunately, I have
                  > > not seen this in practice, since usually the hangings have been changed
                  > > before the service begins. This is a pity. I'm sure that such a
                  > > practice would have just as striking an effect as the change from dark
                  > > to light vestments has on Great Saturday.
                  > >
                  > > Finally, in one of the postings concerning the Rite of Forgiveness, it
                  > > was mentioned that in one parish the various invocations of the saints
                  > > were sung after the paschal stichera, as is done "in Jordanville." One
                  > > should keep in mind that the invocation of the saints is done in
                  > > Jordanville because the Rite of Forgiveness is performed there not after
                  > > Vespers but after Compline, and the invocation of the saints is always
                  > > done in Jordanville at the end of Compline. There is no inherent
                  > > connection between the invocation of the saints and the Vespers of
                  > > Cheesefare Sunday or the Rite of Forgiveness.
                  > >
                  > > Daniel Olson
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ______________________________________________________
                  > >
                  > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > > eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/ustav
                  > > Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
                  > >
                  >
                • deaconddemetrius
                  ... the ... In our parish, we change the hangings and the clergy vestments at Vouchsafe... dnd [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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                    > May I ask: does it apply to the vestments of the clergy as well as
                    the
                    > paraments? 

                    In our parish, we change the
                    hangings and the clergy vestments at "Vouchsafe..."

                    dnd


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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