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Re: [ustav] Re: blessing of candles on Feb. 2

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  • Ploverleigh@aol.com
    In a message dated 12/4/00 8:41:52 PM, business@expandingedge.com writes:
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 6, 2000
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      In a message dated 12/4/00 8:41:52 PM, business@... writes:

      << This is actually not an unusual reason for why a number of feasts occur
      on the days they do. Another would be the Triumph of the Holy Cross
      (Sept 14), which with the 15th was the dedication of the Holy Sepulchre
      Church. By the way, Triumph of the Cross _is_ 40 days from August
      6/Transfiguration (counting both feasts), a meaningful (and doubtless
      deliberate) relationship in view of the Lord's prophecy of his own
      impending death, on the way down from the peak of Tabor. >>

      FWIW, before V2, August 6 was called "Dedication of the Basilica of the
      Transfiguration on Mt. Tabor" on the other side of the Tiber.
    • Rev. John R. Shaw
      ... This terminology does not appear in any of the pre-Vat. II sources I have seen. The Feast of the Transfiguration had only been revived in the West in the
      Message 2 of 18 , Dec 6, 2000
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        On Wed, 6 Dec 2000 Ploverleigh@... wrote:
        >
        > FWIW, before V2, August 6 was called "Dedication of the Basilica of the
        > Transfiguration on Mt. Tabor" on the other side of the Tiber.
        >
        This terminology does not appear in any of the pre-Vat. II sources
        I have seen. The Feast of the Transfiguration had only been revived in the
        West in the late Middle Ages, and appears as a sort of "appendix" in the
        printed Sarum books, and others. Formerly Aug. 6 had simply been the
        feast of St.
        Sixtus. However, even then there had been a blessing of grapes on that
        day.

        In Christ
        Fr. John R. Shaw
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