Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[ustav] Re: ANTIDORON

Expand Messages
  • Polychroni
    ... I believe, but am not certain, that the commemoration of the Bodiless Powers in the in the preparation of the Body and Blood is not a universal practice.
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 1, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      On 31 Jan 00, at 12:50, [Archimandrite] Serge Keleher wrote:

      > May the Lord bless us!
      >
      > Someone asked "is the bread that is given out with the wine in
      > Slavic Churches really "antidoron" or just "blessed bread"? '
      > Hmmm. When I was a young priest (say about 31 years ago) an older
      > priest told me that the authentic Antidoron is the pieces of prosphora
      > which remain from the loaf from which the Holy Lamb was cut, and that
      > these pieces should only be eaten when one has fasted totally. According
      > to this priest, the same strictness did not apply to the pieces from the
      > other prosphora (which had been used for the commemorations of the Holy
      > Theotokos, the Nine Ranks, the living and the reposed).

      I believe, but am not certain, that the commemoration of the Bodiless
      Powers in the in the preparation of the Body and Blood is not a universal
      practice. Perhaps someone can remark on this (perhaps another thread).

      [snip]
      > Never once, anywhere, in all these years, have I run across the
      > phenomenon of priests asking those who come up to kiss the Cross at the
      > conclusion of the Divine Liturgy whether they are fasting from the night
      > before, and bestowing or refusing the Antidoron in accordance with the
      > response.
      [snip]

      My experience is that the vast preponderance of laity have no idea that the
      Antidoron is to be received fasting. And, why don't they know?...because
      their presbyter has not so instructed them. So, it seems no wonder that
      the same presbyter would not be diligent in this matter at all, anyhow.
      For that matter, I've never seen a presbyter refuse the Antidoron to
      *anyone*, even if he be, say, a visiting Hindu.

      Moreover, as Dn. David James rightly pointed out, those who have not fasted
      can take the Antidoron with them to consume the following morning. So, if
      the laity are at all cognizant of their proper Church conduct in this
      regard, it should pose no problem.

      In Christ,

      Polychroni
    • Polychroni
      ... I believe, but am not certain, that the commemoration of the Bodiless Powers in the in the preparation of the Body and Blood is not a universal practice.
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 1, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        On 31 Jan 00, at 12:50, [Archimandrite] Serge Keleher wrote:

        > May the Lord bless us!
        >
        > Someone asked "is the bread that is given out with the wine in
        > Slavic Churches really "antidoron" or just "blessed bread"? '
        > Hmmm. When I was a young priest (say about 31 years ago) an older
        > priest told me that the authentic Antidoron is the pieces of prosphora
        > which remain from the loaf from which the Holy Lamb was cut, and that
        > these pieces should only be eaten when one has fasted totally. According
        > to this priest, the same strictness did not apply to the pieces from the
        > other prosphora (which had been used for the commemorations of the Holy
        > Theotokos, the Nine Ranks, the living and the reposed).

        I believe, but am not certain, that the commemoration of the Bodiless
        Powers in the in the preparation of the Body and Blood is not a universal
        practice. Perhaps someone can remark on this (perhaps another thread).

        [snip]
        > Never once, anywhere, in all these years, have I run across the
        > phenomenon of priests asking those who come up to kiss the Cross at the
        > conclusion of the Divine Liturgy whether they are fasting from the night
        > before, and bestowing or refusing the Antidoron in accordance with the
        > response.
        [snip]

        My experience is that the vast preponderance of laity have no idea that the
        Antidoron is to be received fasting. And, why don't they know?...because
        their presbyter has not so instructed them. So, it seems no wonder that
        the same presbyter would not be diligent in this matter at all, anyhow.
        For that matter, I've never seen a presbyter refuse the Antidoron to
        *anyone*, even if he be, say, a visiting Hindu.

        Moreover, as Dn. David James rightly pointed out, those who have not fasted
        can take the Antidoron with them to consume the following morning. So, if
        the laity are at all cognizant of their proper Church conduct in this
        regard, it should pose no problem.

        In Christ,

        Polychroni
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.