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Re: Great Canon Matins for Thursday of 5th week

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  • S. Miller
    Father, The Typikon is silent on the ending of Matins, but does indicate that the Hours are read quickly because of the difficult vigil. I would suggest that
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 17, 2013
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      Father,

      The Typikon is silent on the ending of Matins, but does indicate that the Hours are read quickly because of the difficult vigil. I would suggest that there is a valid difference of opinion here. The first option usually has the Ephrem Prayer said without the repitions.

      The reader Daniel Olson may have a differet opinion.

      dn Sergius Miller

      --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, Hieromonk Innokenty <innokenty.reichert@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello:
      >
      > Why is there a difference between the ODS (3B18) and the St. Innocent calendar in regards of the ending of the Matins for the Great Canon Matins?
      > The ODS says there is a normal ending to the Matins:
      >
      > after the Aposticha we say
      > It is good to give praise once.
      > then Trisagion
      > Standing in the temple of thy glory
      > Litany: Have mercy on us with exclamation "For a merciful God art Thou". Choir: Amen:
      > 1st Hour
      >
      > but the St. Innocent calendar prescribes a Lenten ending (as in all weekday services) with St. Ephraim prayer without 12 bows?
      >
      > ODS also says that at the Hours the prayer of St. Ephraim is NOT said. But St. Innocent Calendar prescribes St. Ephraim prayer without 12 bows.
      >
      > So I am not sure who is right, or if these are just two different practices.
      >
      > In Christ
      > Hieromonk Innokenty
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Daniel Olson
      ... As Fr. Deacon Sergius has correctly noted, the Typicon is silent about the end of Matins on Thursday of the Fifth Week. Regarding the Hours and the Typica
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 21, 2013
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        On Apr 17, 2013, Hieromonk Innokenty wrote:

        > Why is there a difference between the ODS (3B18) and the St. Innocent calendar in regards of the ending of the Matins for the Great Canon Matins?
        > The ODS says there is a normal ending to the Matins:
        >
        > after the Aposticha we say
        > It is good to give praise once.
        > then Trisagion
        > Standing in the temple of thy glory
        > Litany: Have mercy on us with exclamation "For a merciful God art Thou". Choir: Amen:
        > 1st Hour
        >
        > but the St. Innocent calendar prescribes a Lenten ending (as in all weekday services) with St. Ephraim prayer without 12 bows?
        >
        > ODS also says that at the Hours the prayer of St. Ephraim is NOT said. But St. Innocent Calendar prescribes St. Ephraim prayer without 12 bows.
        >
        > So I am not sure who is right, or if these are just two different practices.

        On Apr 17, 2013, Deacon Sergius Miller wrote:

        > The Typikon is silent on the ending of Matins, but does indicate that the Hours are read quickly because of the difficult vigil. I would suggest that there is a valid difference of opinion here. The first option usually has the Ephrem Prayer said without the repitions.

        As Fr. Deacon Sergius has correctly noted, the Typicon is silent about the end of Matins on Thursday of the Fifth Week. Regarding the Hours and the Typica on Thursday of the Fifth Week, the Typicon limits itself to one, somewhat laconic phrase: "We sing the whole service quickly."

        The lack of detailed rubrics in the Typicon has given risen to a variety of approaches as to how the services on Thursday of the Fifth Week should be performed. Most of these approaches require various modifications to the actual structure of the Lenten services; but there is also no unanimity regarding the form that these modifications should take.

        The basic problem here appears to be a misunderstanding of the term "quickly" in the Typicon. This term also appears in other places in the Typicon, where it is often joined with the phrase "without melody" (Greek, xwris melous). This Greek phrase is translated into Slavonic as "bez penija" ("without singing"), which unfortunately is a misleading translation since it is not really "singing" that is referred to, but rather the use of melody. This understanding is further reinforced by the Typicon's use of the term "simply" (in Slavonic "prosto"), which also occurs in places in connection with "quickly" and "without melody". Thus, what the Typicon is actually prescribing is chanting that is simple, quick and without melody, which results in a shortening of the length of the services.

        In contemporary practice, this has come to mean merely "reading" the parts that are usually sung, although this does not seem to be the original concept. Nonetheless, the result is much the same.

        In using the terms "quickly", "without melody" and "simply", the Typicon does not actually modify the Lenten structure of the services but rather modifies the mode of execution of the services. There are other places in the Typicon, where this may be observed as well. For example, in the rubrics for Wednesday and Friday of Cheesefare Week, when the Lenten service is appointed, the Typicon also uses "quickly" and "without melody"; but the Lenten structure of the services on these two days remains unmodified. The same is also true for the Lenten services appointed during the lesser fast periods. For example, in the rubrics for the Nativity Fast (under 14 November), the Typicon says that at the Hours and at Compline "we say all the troparia and theotokia, and 'God is with us', quickly without melody."

        These examples -- Wednesday and Friday of Cheesefare Week and the lesser fast periods � provide the best pattern for performing the services on Thursday of the Fifth Week.

        Confusion also arises from a misunderstanding of the provisions in the Typicon for festal (polyeleos-rank or vigil-rank) commemorations that occur on weekdays of Great Lent. On such occasions, the Typicon prescribes definite modifications to the structure of the services. These modifications include the following elements: (1) the use of the daily form of the service rather than the Lenten form at the conclusion of Vespers and Matins; (2) the recitation of the Prayer of St. Ephraim at each service only one time with three prostrations; (3) the omission of the concluding Trisagion Prayers at the end of Vespers, Compline, the First Hour and the Typica. These features, which in the Typicon apply only to festal services, are inappropriate for Thursday of the Fifth Week, which has an exclusively Lenten character as befits the penitential nature of the Great Canon.

        It is also instructive to see how other Orthodox traditions view this matter. For example, in the Russian Old Rite (see the Old Rite website at http://rpsc.ru/ustav/bogosluzhebnij-ustav-na-voskresnie-i-prazdnichnie-dni-aprelya-2013-g), the services are prescribed to be performed according to the usual Lenten order without any modification. In particular, the full number of prostrations are performed with the Prayer of St. Ephraim and the concluding Trisagion Prayers are not omitted.

        Regarding Romanian practice, Cezar Login, a contributor to the Ustav List, wrote to me last year that the Romanian edition of the Sabbaite Typicon prescribes the usual Lenten order on Thursday of the Fifth Week. He also kindly added that the Greek Sabbaite Typicon edited by Fr. Rigas prescribes the same.

        In summary, the following provisions apply to the services for Thursday of the Fifth Week:

        1. Matins

        a. The service should conclude as usual for a Lenten service.

        b. "It is good to give praise unto the Lord�" may be said once instead of twice, since this reduction is prescribed at the Lenten services during Cheesefare Week and during the lesser fast periods.

        c. The Prayer of St. Ephraim should be said twice with the usual prostrations and bows.

        2. First Hour

        a. The service should be performed according to the usual Lenten order.

        b. The Lenten verse after the psalms, "In the morning, hearken unto my voice�," is performed as usual except that the choir does not sing it, but rather the reader chants it in conjunction with the priest, and it is accompanied by the usual full prostrations.

        c. The psalm verses beginning with, "My steps do Thou direct�" are not sung, but read once each (this reduction is also prescribed at the Lenten services during Cheesefare Week and during the lesser fast periods).

        d. The kontakion of the Great Canon replaces the usual Lenten troparion.

        e. The Prayer of St. Ephraim should be said twice with the usual prostrations and bows.

        f. After the Prayer of St. Ephraim, the usual concluding Trisagion Prayers should be said.

        3. Third, Sixth and Ninth Hours

        a. The services should be performed according to the usual Lenten order.

        b. The Lenten troparion appointed at each Hour after the kathisma from the Psalter is performed as usual except that the choir does not sing it, but rather the reader chants it in conjunction with the priest, and it is accompanied by the usual full prostrations.

        c. The kontakion of the Great Canon replaces the usual three Lenten troparia.

        d. The Prayer of St. Ephraim should be said twice with the usual prostrations and bows (except at the Ninth Hour, where, as is usual, it is said only once with only three prostrations).

        4. Typica

        a. The service should be performed according to the usual Lenten order beginning with the Beatitudes.

        b. The Beatitudes are not sung by the choir, but rather they are chanted by the reader. It is customary to omit the refrain "Remember us, O Lord�" after each Beatitude verse (which is also prescribed at the Lenten services during Cheesefare Week).

        c. The three-fold "Remember us�" is not sung by the choir, but rather is chanted by the reader, accompanied by the usual prostrations (which are also prescribed at the Lenten services during Cheesefare Week).

        d. The Prayer of St. Ephraim should be said twice with the usual prostrations and bows.

        e. After the Prayer of St. Ephraim, the usual concluding Trisagion Prayers should be said.

        The above provisions will be included in the forthcoming Volume II of "The Order of Divine Services", which will replace the sections in the current edition that deal with the services of the Lenten Triodion and the Pentecostarion.

        Daniel Olson





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      • deaconddemetrius
        When discussing the OT reading for the 6th hour, I was told that some use a reading from Amos instead of the reading from Isa. Seems older Typicons appoint
        Message 3 of 4 , May 3 1:16 PM
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          When discussing the OT reading for the 6th hour, I was told that some use
          a reading from Amos instead of the reading from Isa. Seems older Typicons
          appoint Amos as the Isaiah passage is read at Vespers for the Taking down
          from the Cross.

          Any wisdom provided would be appreciated.

          dn demetrius


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