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Re: Forgiveness Sunday

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  • subdeaconmichaelastley
    This is a beautiful custom, and one that has heretofore been unknown at my parish. I m glad that I stumbled upon this while looking for something else. May I
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 25, 2013
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      This is a beautiful custom, and one that has heretofore been unknown at my parish.

      I'm glad that I stumbled upon this while looking for something else.

      May I ask: does it apply to the vestments of the clergy as well as the paraments?

      Many thanks.

      Michael

      --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel Olson" <daniellector@...> wrote:
      >
      > I would like to offer the following observations regarding Forgiveness
      > Sunday and the Rite of Forgiveness.
      >
      > It is interesting to note that the name "Forgiveness Sunday" does not
      > appear in the church service books. The title that does appear is
      > "Cheesefare Sunday, the Expulsion of Adam."
      >
      > In the service for Cheesefare Sunday, the theme of forgiveness is
      > notably absent. Almost all the liturgical texts deal with the expulsion
      > of Adam, while a few deal with the approaching Lenten struggle. There
      > is also no reference to forgiveness in the texts of the Vespers service
      > on Cheesefare Sunday evening.
      >
      > The theme of forgiveness is, of course, prominent in the Gospel lesson
      > for Cheesefare Sunday (Matt. 6;14-21). It is perhaps from this Gospel
      > reading that the popular designation "Forgiveness Sunday" is derived. It
      > is also quite likely that this popular designation is related to the
      > universal practice of asking for forgiveness on this day at the onset of
      > Great Lent.
      >
      > It is curious that there is no mention in the Typicon of the exchange of
      > forgiveness on Cheesefare Sunday. This omission seems all the more
      > unusual because it apparently was the custom in the Palestinian
      > monasteries to ask for forgiveness at the beginning of Great Lent. For
      > example, in the life of St. Mary of Egypt there is the following
      > passage: "The all gathered in church, and after praying earnestly with
      > prostrations, the elders kissed one another and asked forgivenesss."
      >
      > The Typicon does prescribe the asking of forgiveness, but it is
      > appointed at a much later time -- on Wednesday of Passion Week at the
      > end of the Hours and the Typica. The passage in the Typicon reads as
      > follows: "And instead of the dismissal, the superior says 'O Master
      > plenteous in mercy...,' the whole prayer to the end. While this said,
      > we, falling down to the ground, pray. And after its completion, when we
      > have stood up, he [the superior] himself bows to the brethren and asks
      > forgiveness, saying: 'Bless [me] holy fathers and forgive me a sinner
      > wherein I have sinned throughout my life, and throughout the holy forty
      > days, in word, deed, thought and in all my senses.' And the brethren
      > answer: 'May God forgive thee, venerable father.' Then the brethren
      > come up two by two, and they too similarly ask for forgiveness saying:
      > 'Forgive me, holy father,' and the rest as written above. And receiving
      > forgiveness, we go to our cells and are silent until the vesper hour."
      >
      > Since there is no mention in the Typicon about what should be sung
      > during the exchange of forgiveness, this seems to be a matter of local
      > custom, and, apparently, practices vary widely from place to place. I
      > have most often encountered the singing of paschal hymns -- either the
      > irmosi of the paschal canon or the paschal stichera.
      >
      > It seems to me that the paschal stichera are quite appropriate for
      > Forgiveness Sunday, not only in their capacity as paschal hymns, but
      > also because in the final sticheron the theme of forgiveness is taken up
      > rather strikingly: "And let us embrace one another. Let us say, 'O
      > brethren,' even to them that hate us: let us forgive all things on the
      > Resurrection..."
      >
      > One thing that I find somewhat incongruous is the practice of ending the
      > final paschal sticheron at the words "and thus let us cry," and then
      > omitting the words of the paschal hymn "Christ is risen from the
      > dead..." It hardly makes sense to sing "and thus let us cry" and then
      > not cry out anything at all. If one is going to sing any of the hymns
      > that are specifically paschal, there is no logical reason not to sing
      > "Christ is risen from the dead..," which is an integral part of the
      > sticheron.
      >
      > As far as the manner of singing the paschal hymns is concerned, I think
      > that they should be sung in a natural, joyful way. Perhaps it is not
      > necessary to sing them quite as exhuberantly as on Pascha itself, but it
      > also is not necessary to change their inherent nature by singing them
      > too softly, too slowly, or "penitentially."
      >
      > A note in "The Lenten Triodion" states that at "Vouchsafe, O Lord..." in
      > the Vespers on Forgiveness Sunday, "the covers on the ikon-stands and
      > the other hangings in the church are...changed." Unfortunately, I have
      > not seen this in practice, since usually the hangings have been changed
      > before the service begins. This is a pity. I'm sure that such a
      > practice would have just as striking an effect as the change from dark
      > to light vestments has on Great Saturday.
      >
      > Finally, in one of the postings concerning the Rite of Forgiveness, it
      > was mentioned that in one parish the various invocations of the saints
      > were sung after the paschal stichera, as is done "in Jordanville." One
      > should keep in mind that the invocation of the saints is done in
      > Jordanville because the Rite of Forgiveness is performed there not after
      > Vespers but after Compline, and the invocation of the saints is always
      > done in Jordanville at the end of Compline. There is no inherent
      > connection between the invocation of the saints and the Vespers of
      > Cheesefare Sunday or the Rite of Forgiveness.
      >
      > Daniel Olson
      >
      >
      > ______________________________________________________
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/ustav
      > Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
      >
    • S. Miller
      The clergy also change from light to dark. dn. Sergius
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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        The clergy also change from light to dark.

        dn. Sergius


        --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "subdeaconmichaelastley" <subdeaconmichael@...> wrote:
        >
        > This is a beautiful custom, and one that has heretofore been unknown at my parish.
        >
        > I'm glad that I stumbled upon this while looking for something else.
        >
        > May I ask: does it apply to the vestments of the clergy as well as the paraments?
        >
        > Many thanks.
        >
        > Michael
        >
        > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel Olson" <daniellector@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I would like to offer the following observations regarding Forgiveness
        > > Sunday and the Rite of Forgiveness.
        > >
        > > It is interesting to note that the name "Forgiveness Sunday" does not
        > > appear in the church service books. The title that does appear is
        > > "Cheesefare Sunday, the Expulsion of Adam."
        > >
        > > In the service for Cheesefare Sunday, the theme of forgiveness is
        > > notably absent. Almost all the liturgical texts deal with the expulsion
        > > of Adam, while a few deal with the approaching Lenten struggle. There
        > > is also no reference to forgiveness in the texts of the Vespers service
        > > on Cheesefare Sunday evening.
        > >
        > > The theme of forgiveness is, of course, prominent in the Gospel lesson
        > > for Cheesefare Sunday (Matt. 6;14-21). It is perhaps from this Gospel
        > > reading that the popular designation "Forgiveness Sunday" is derived. It
        > > is also quite likely that this popular designation is related to the
        > > universal practice of asking for forgiveness on this day at the onset of
        > > Great Lent.
        > >
        > > It is curious that there is no mention in the Typicon of the exchange of
        > > forgiveness on Cheesefare Sunday. This omission seems all the more
        > > unusual because it apparently was the custom in the Palestinian
        > > monasteries to ask for forgiveness at the beginning of Great Lent. For
        > > example, in the life of St. Mary of Egypt there is the following
        > > passage: "The all gathered in church, and after praying earnestly with
        > > prostrations, the elders kissed one another and asked forgivenesss."
        > >
        > > The Typicon does prescribe the asking of forgiveness, but it is
        > > appointed at a much later time -- on Wednesday of Passion Week at the
        > > end of the Hours and the Typica. The passage in the Typicon reads as
        > > follows: "And instead of the dismissal, the superior says 'O Master
        > > plenteous in mercy...,' the whole prayer to the end. While this said,
        > > we, falling down to the ground, pray. And after its completion, when we
        > > have stood up, he [the superior] himself bows to the brethren and asks
        > > forgiveness, saying: 'Bless [me] holy fathers and forgive me a sinner
        > > wherein I have sinned throughout my life, and throughout the holy forty
        > > days, in word, deed, thought and in all my senses.' And the brethren
        > > answer: 'May God forgive thee, venerable father.' Then the brethren
        > > come up two by two, and they too similarly ask for forgiveness saying:
        > > 'Forgive me, holy father,' and the rest as written above. And receiving
        > > forgiveness, we go to our cells and are silent until the vesper hour."
        > >
        > > Since there is no mention in the Typicon about what should be sung
        > > during the exchange of forgiveness, this seems to be a matter of local
        > > custom, and, apparently, practices vary widely from place to place. I
        > > have most often encountered the singing of paschal hymns -- either the
        > > irmosi of the paschal canon or the paschal stichera.
        > >
        > > It seems to me that the paschal stichera are quite appropriate for
        > > Forgiveness Sunday, not only in their capacity as paschal hymns, but
        > > also because in the final sticheron the theme of forgiveness is taken up
        > > rather strikingly: "And let us embrace one another. Let us say, 'O
        > > brethren,' even to them that hate us: let us forgive all things on the
        > > Resurrection..."
        > >
        > > One thing that I find somewhat incongruous is the practice of ending the
        > > final paschal sticheron at the words "and thus let us cry," and then
        > > omitting the words of the paschal hymn "Christ is risen from the
        > > dead..." It hardly makes sense to sing "and thus let us cry" and then
        > > not cry out anything at all. If one is going to sing any of the hymns
        > > that are specifically paschal, there is no logical reason not to sing
        > > "Christ is risen from the dead..," which is an integral part of the
        > > sticheron.
        > >
        > > As far as the manner of singing the paschal hymns is concerned, I think
        > > that they should be sung in a natural, joyful way. Perhaps it is not
        > > necessary to sing them quite as exhuberantly as on Pascha itself, but it
        > > also is not necessary to change their inherent nature by singing them
        > > too softly, too slowly, or "penitentially."
        > >
        > > A note in "The Lenten Triodion" states that at "Vouchsafe, O Lord..." in
        > > the Vespers on Forgiveness Sunday, "the covers on the ikon-stands and
        > > the other hangings in the church are...changed." Unfortunately, I have
        > > not seen this in practice, since usually the hangings have been changed
        > > before the service begins. This is a pity. I'm sure that such a
        > > practice would have just as striking an effect as the change from dark
        > > to light vestments has on Great Saturday.
        > >
        > > Finally, in one of the postings concerning the Rite of Forgiveness, it
        > > was mentioned that in one parish the various invocations of the saints
        > > were sung after the paschal stichera, as is done "in Jordanville." One
        > > should keep in mind that the invocation of the saints is done in
        > > Jordanville because the Rite of Forgiveness is performed there not after
        > > Vespers but after Compline, and the invocation of the saints is always
        > > done in Jordanville at the end of Compline. There is no inherent
        > > connection between the invocation of the saints and the Vespers of
        > > Cheesefare Sunday or the Rite of Forgiveness.
        > >
        > > Daniel Olson
        > >
        > >
        > > ______________________________________________________
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > > eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/ustav
        > > Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
        > >
        >
      • deaconddemetrius
        ... the ... In our parish, we change the hangings and the clergy vestments at Vouchsafe... dnd [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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          > May I ask: does it apply to the vestments of the clergy as well as
          the
          > paraments? 

          In our parish, we change the
          hangings and the clergy vestments at "Vouchsafe..."

          dnd


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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