Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [ustav] Re: Historical event in Russia

Expand Messages
  • Meg Lark
    ... Laughing - I had the same reaction. Too much time on Facebook! In Christ, Margaret Lark ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 17, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      On Thu, Jan 17, 2013 at 12:23 AM, stephen_r1937 <stephen_r1937@...>wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > Where's the "Like" button?
      >

      Laughing - I had the same reaction. Too much time on Facebook!

      In Christ,
      Margaret Lark

      >
      > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" wrote:
      > >
      > > This past Sunday morning, a momentous historical event took place in
      > Russia. Members of Moscow's Edinoversty ("Co-religionist") community
      > celebrated the Divine Liturgy in Uspensky Sobor (Dormition Cathedral)
      > inside the walls of the Moscow Kremlin. This was the FIRST time in over 350
      > years that the Russian Old Rite was allowed to be used in the Cathedral of
      > the Dormition -- the very church where the Old Rite was first abolished.
      > Services were performed strictly according to the Old Rite, including the
      > use of unison Znamenny Chant, pre-Nikonian style vestments, and the
      > 2-fingered Sign of the Cross and priestly blessing. Metropolitan Juvenaly
      > of Krutitsy and Kolomna was the serving hierarch. This historical event
      > took place during this year's national conference of the Edinovertsy
      > community, marking the occasion of the First Edinovertsy Conference which
      > was held 100 years ago.
      > >
      > > Edinovertsy follow the pre-Nikonian rituals and traditions of the
      > Russian Church, while being members of the modern Russian Orthodox Church,
      > Moscow Patriarchate (and also the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia).
      > The "Old Rite" was officially abolished and banned by Patriarch Nikon
      > starting at the Cathedral of the Dormition in Great Lent of 1652 through
      > 1666 (together with a lot of book burning and public persecutions); the Old
      > Ritualists were formally anathematized at the Moscow Council of 1666-67
      > (and Patriarch Nikon was deposed for his opposition of Tsar Aleksei and for
      > abandoning his office for several years). Although the bans against the Old
      > Believers remained in effect, the Synodal Church in 1800 created a
      > "potentially duplicitous" program to allow Old Believers to reunite with
      > the Church while retaining the use of the "Old Rite". Only a small number
      > of parishes have ever chosen to be Edinoversty, from the beginning of the
      > movement until the present, largely due to fear of being forced to
      > eventually give up the Old Rite (which has mostly proven to be unfounded).
      > Before the Russian Revolution there were around 300 parishes of
      > Edinovertsy, while during the Soviet period their numbers dwindled to a
      > total of 8 parishes; their numbers have risen to around 30 parishes since
      > the fall of the Soviet regime. Despite the many difficulties that the
      > Edinovertsy community has gone through, it is a significant development in
      > the course of Russian Orthodoxy.
      > >
      > > In 1971 the Moscow Patriarchate revoked the anathemas imposed on the Old
      > Believers in the 17th century, and in 1974, the Russian Orthodox Church
      > Outside Russia issued an ukase revoking the anathemas and asked forgiveness
      > from the Old Believers for the wrongs done them. This has not had a great
      > far-reaching effect, but it has certainly brought the Old Rite and Old
      > Ritualists (both Edinovertsy and Old Believers) into the news again and
      > again, until most people in Russia are now familiar with who the Old
      > Ritualists are, what they believe and stand for, and the great courage and
      > devotion that they possess in keeping Russia's ancient spiritual traditions
      > alive in today's world. (There is also a considerable amount of
      > cross-jurisdictional dialogue in today's world, both official and
      > unofficial, between ranking members of the Old Believers and individual
      > bishops of the Moscow Patriarchate -- a gradual warming of relations.)
      > Further public education has been accomplished by the acclaimed 20-hour
      > long miniseries on the "Raskol" (Schism of the Old Believers), which aired
      > on Russian State television in 2012.
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • starina77
      I see that someone did a brief bit of stealth recording (to our benefit!), as videotaping services is usually forbidden in Old Rite communities:
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 18, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I see that someone did a brief bit of stealth recording (to our benefit!), as videotaping services is usually forbidden in Old Rite communities:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98vm7W6GPAQ

        --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" wrote:
        >
        > Where's the "Like" button?
        >
        > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" wrote:
        > >
        > > This past Sunday morning, a momentous historical event took place in Russia. Members of Moscow's Edinoversty ("Co-religionist") community celebrated the Divine Liturgy in Uspensky Sobor (Dormition Cathedral) inside the walls of the Moscow Kremlin. This was the FIRST time in over 350 years that the Russian Old Rite was allowed to be used in the Cathedral of the Dormition -- the very church where the Old Rite was first abolished. Services were performed strictly according to the Old Rite, including the use of unison Znamenny Chant, pre-Nikonian style vestments, and the 2-fingered Sign of the Cross and priestly blessing. Metropolitan Juvenaly of Krutitsy and Kolomna was the serving hierarch. This historical event took place during this year's national conference of the Edinovertsy community, marking the occasion of the First Edinovertsy Conference which was held 100 years ago.
        > >
        > > Edinovertsy follow the pre-Nikonian rituals and traditions of the Russian Church, while being members of the modern Russian Orthodox Church, Moscow Patriarchate (and also the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia). The "Old Rite" was officially abolished and banned by Patriarch Nikon starting at the Cathedral of the Dormition in Great Lent of 1652 through 1666 (together with a lot of book burning and public persecutions); the Old Ritualists were formally anathematized at the Moscow Council of 1666-67 (and Patriarch Nikon was deposed for his opposition of Tsar Aleksei and for abandoning his office for several years). Although the bans against the Old Believers remained in effect, the Synodal Church in 1800 created a "potentially duplicitous" program to allow Old Believers to reunite with the Church while retaining the use of the "Old Rite". Only a small number of parishes have ever chosen to be Edinoversty, from the beginning of the movement until the present, largely due to fear of being forced to eventually give up the Old Rite (which has mostly proven to be unfounded). Before the Russian Revolution there were around 300 parishes of Edinovertsy, while during the Soviet period their numbers dwindled to a total of 8 parishes; their numbers have risen to around 30 parishes since the fall of the Soviet regime. Despite the many difficulties that the Edinovertsy community has gone through, it is a significant development in the course of Russian Orthodoxy.
        > >
        > > In 1971 the Moscow Patriarchate revoked the anathemas imposed on the Old Believers in the 17th century, and in 1974, the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia issued an ukase revoking the anathemas and asked forgiveness from the Old Believers for the wrongs done them. This has not had a great far-reaching effect, but it has certainly brought the Old Rite and Old Ritualists (both Edinovertsy and Old Believers) into the news again and again, until most people in Russia are now familiar with who the Old Ritualists are, what they believe and stand for, and the great courage and devotion that they possess in keeping Russia's ancient spiritual traditions alive in today's world. (There is also a considerable amount of cross-jurisdictional dialogue in today's world, both official and unofficial, between ranking members of the Old Believers and individual bishops of the Moscow Patriarchate -- a gradual warming of relations.) Further public education has been accomplished by the acclaimed 20-hour long miniseries on the "Raskol" (Schism of the Old Believers), which aired on Russian State television in 2012.
        > >
        > > For more detailed information about this event, see (in Russian):
        > > http://rus.ruvr.ru/2013_01_12/Vpervie-so-vremen-raskola-v-Moskovskom-Kremle-sovershena-liturgija-drevnim-chinom/
        > >
        > > For a beautiful collection of photographs of the event, see:
        > > http://www.mepar.ru/news/2013/01/12/14768/
        > >
        > > For more information about the Old Rite, Old Believers and Edinovertsy, see:
        > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Believers
        > >
        > > (compiled by Nikita Simmons, January 14, 2013, n.s.)
        > >
        >
      • Antonio Palad
        An audio recording of the entire Divine Liturgy can be listened to, and downloaded, at the following link: http://www.divshare.com/download/23495984-30d 
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 7 11:54 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          An audio recording of the entire Divine Liturgy can be listened to, and downloaded, at the following link:

          http://www.divshare.com/download/23495984-30d%c2%a0




          ________________________________
          From: starina77 <starina77@...>
          To: ustav@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2013 11:14 AM
          Subject: [ustav] Re: Historical event in Russia


           
          I see that someone did a brief bit of stealth recording (to our benefit!), as videotaping services is usually forbidden in Old Rite communities:
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98vm7W6GPAQ

          --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" wrote:
          >
          > Where's the "Like" button?
          >
          > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" wrote:
          > >
          > > This past Sunday morning, a momentous historical event took place in Russia. Members of Moscow's Edinoversty ("Co-religionist") community celebrated the Divine Liturgy in Uspensky Sobor (Dormition Cathedral) inside the walls of the Moscow Kremlin. This was the FIRST time in over 350 years that the Russian Old Rite was allowed to be used in the Cathedral of the Dormition -- the very church where the Old Rite was first abolished. Services were performed strictly according to the Old Rite, including the use of unison Znamenny Chant, pre-Nikonian style vestments, and the 2-fingered Sign of the Cross and priestly blessing. Metropolitan Juvenaly of Krutitsy and Kolomna was the serving hierarch. This historical event took place during this year's national conference of the Edinovertsy community, marking the occasion of the First Edinovertsy Conference which was held 100 years ago.
          > >
          > > Edinovertsy follow the pre-Nikonian rituals and traditions of the Russian Church, while being members of the modern Russian Orthodox Church, Moscow Patriarchate (and also the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia). The "Old Rite" was officially abolished and banned by Patriarch Nikon starting at the Cathedral of the Dormition in Great Lent of 1652 through 1666 (together with a lot of book burning and public persecutions); the Old Ritualists were formally anathematized at the Moscow Council of 1666-67 (and Patriarch Nikon was deposed for his opposition of Tsar Aleksei and for abandoning his office for several years). Although the bans against the Old Believers remained in effect, the Synodal Church in 1800 created a "potentially duplicitous" program to allow Old Believers to reunite with the Church while retaining the use of the "Old Rite". Only a small number of parishes have ever chosen to be Edinoversty, from the beginning of the movement until
          the present, largely due to fear of being forced to eventually give up the Old Rite (which has mostly proven to be unfounded). Before the Russian Revolution there were around 300 parishes of Edinovertsy, while during the Soviet period their numbers dwindled to a total of 8 parishes; their numbers have risen to around 30 parishes since the fall of the Soviet regime. Despite the many difficulties that the Edinovertsy community has gone through, it is a significant development in the course of Russian Orthodoxy.
          > >
          > > In 1971 the Moscow Patriarchate revoked the anathemas imposed on the Old Believers in the 17th century, and in 1974, the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia issued an ukase revoking the anathemas and asked forgiveness from the Old Believers for the wrongs done them. This has not had a great far-reaching effect, but it has certainly brought the Old Rite and Old Ritualists (both Edinovertsy and Old Believers) into the news again and again, until most people in Russia are now familiar with who the Old Ritualists are, what they believe and stand for, and the great courage and devotion that they possess in keeping Russia's ancient spiritual traditions alive in today's world. (There is also a considerable amount of cross-jurisdictional dialogue in today's world, both official and unofficial, between ranking members of the Old Believers and individual bishops of the Moscow Patriarchate -- a gradual warming of relations.) Further public education has been
          accomplished by the acclaimed 20-hour long miniseries on the "Raskol" (Schism of the Old Believers), which aired on Russian State television in 2012.
          > >
          > > For more detailed information about this event, see (in Russian):
          > > http://rus.ruvr.ru/2013_01_12/Vpervie-so-vremen-raskola-v-Moskovskom-Kremle-sovershena-liturgija-drevnim-chinom/
          > >
          > > For a beautiful collection of photographs of the event, see:
          > > http://www.mepar.ru/news/2013/01/12/14768/
          > >
          > > For more information about the Old Rite, Old Believers and Edinovertsy, see:
          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Believers
          > >
          > > (compiled by Nikita Simmons, January 14, 2013, n.s.)
          > >
          >




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.