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Re: Typikon symbols for ranks of feasts

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  • frjohnwhiteford
    The St. Innocent Calendar uses them.
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 15, 2012
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      The St. Innocent Calendar uses them.

      --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@...> wrote:
      >
      > Several years ago I inquired on a number of on-line forums about the Greek typicon symbols designating different classes of feasts. Many years ago, before the internet and in a library not rich in books on Orthodoxy, I found these easily. Over the course of several relocations, the page on which I had written them out has disappeared. When I inquired, with access to the internet and to a much larger bibliography, I was utterly unable to find even any mention of the existence of a set of symbols differing from those found it Slavonic liturgical books. My efforts on the forums were fruitless; I got not a single response.
      >
      > Now, at last I have the answer. The recently-published book of Archimandrite Job Getcha, _The Typikon Decoded_ (translated by Paul Meyendorff; Orthodox Liturgy Series, № 3; Yonkers, New York: St Vladimir's Seminary Press, 2012), provides both the Slavic and the Greek signs on page 99.
      >
      > The explanation of these signs, which I presume was supplied by Hieromonk Makarios of Simonos Petras Monastery, Archimandrite Job's consultant on Greek usage, does not permit easy comparison with the Slavonic signs. To begin with, there is no color coding; whether the Greek signs are printed in black or in red is of no account in respect of their significance. If I understand them correctly, there is no sign for a six-stichera service. A plain Latin cross designates a service with great doxology at Mattins, so it is the full equivalent of the Slavonic sign—the red "horse shoe" or "notched semicircle" with three dots—that indicates a doxology-rank ( = fourth-class) service. A cross pomée (a Greek cross with enlarged ends, essentially a four-pointed asterisk) designates a service with "readings at Vespers and gospel at Mattins"; I take this to mean a third-class service (that is, one of either polyeleos or vigil rank). A Latin cross in outline designates a service with "resurrectional office sung with the office of the feast if it falls on Sunday." Some elements from the Menaion are always present on Sundays; others, such as, in Greek usage, the anoixantaria, are allowed on third-class days. But I suppose that what is meant here is great feasts of the Theotokos (fourth-class feasts), where at Mattins the Eothinon gospel of the eleven-week cycle is supplanted by a gospel of the feast, the Magnificat is not sung, &c. Finally, a Latin cross within and outline designates a day on which the office of the feasts bumps the Sunday service, that is, a great feast of the Lord, a first-class feast.
      > The project for encoding the Typikon symbols in Unicode should be expanded to include these Greek symbols.
      >
      > There are some additions to the body of typikon symbols used in various publications.
      >
      > 1. At http://www.ponomar.net/typicon.html one finds a spoked wheel used to designate the simple commemoration without six stichera, the lowliest rank, which traditionally has no symbol at all.
      > 2. At http://www.orthodox.cn/liturgical/feastrank_en.htm one finds a set of symbols used by Hieromonk Makarios (mentioned above) in his edition of the Synaxarion: a disc (a large circular dot) denotes a commemoration with no service; a Latin cross means a "memory with service in the Menaion" (a six-stichera service?), a cross pomée means a doxology-rank service; a cross fourchée (that is, a cross with forked ends) means a polyeleos- or vigil-rank service; and the labarum or chi-rho sign designates one of the twelve great feasts.
      > 3. Finally, the Typikon of Isidore Dol'nyc'kyj of 1899 provides a set in which slight modifications of the four standard Slavonic signs are used to make finer distinctions of the various formats of services. (Anyone who wishes to express shock and horror at any mention of a Uniate writer may do so at this point; the Dol'nyc'kyj and Mykyta typikons nevertheless are valuable sources for the old Orthodox practices of their regions, often lost in standard Russian usage.)
      >
      > There are no doubt other variants of which I am unaware.
      >
      > And all this raises the question of why, if we have these symbols, we don't use them. Is there *any* English-language book in which they appear? The Holy Transfiguration Horologion, for example, puts a red Maltese cross in front of every last day in the Menaion, from the simplest commemoration to the Nativity of our Lord.
      >
      > Stephen
      >
    • stephen_r1937
      Thank you, Father John. Stephen ...
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 17, 2012
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        Thank you, Father John.

        Stephen

        --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "frjohnwhiteford" <frjohnwhiteford@...> wrote:
        >
        > The St. Innocent Calendar uses them.
        >
        > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
        > >
        <snip snip>

        > > And all this raises the question of why, if we have these symbols, we don't use them. Is there *any* English-language book in which they appear? The Holy Transfiguration Horologion, for example, puts a red Maltese cross in front of every last day in the Menaion, from the simplest commemoration to the Nativity of our Lord.
        > >
        > > Stephen
        > >
        >
      • stephen_r1937
        ... Thanks for reminding me, Fr John.
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 20, 2012
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          --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "frjohnwhiteford" <frjohnwhiteford@...> wrote:
          >
          > The St. Innocent Calendar uses them.
          >


          Thanks for reminding me, Fr John.
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