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Re: [ustav] Off-topic: Translation question

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  • Silouan Philip Thompson
    This showed up in my in box with no Cyrillic text. I meant to ask: * Radovat sya! * Raduites ! * Or something else entirely? Thanks again, DnS. ... [Non-text
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 29, 2012
      This showed up in my in box with no Cyrillic text. I meant to ask:
      * Radovat'sya!
      * Raduites'!
      * Or something else entirely?

      Thanks again,
      DnS.


      On 11/29/12 5:45 PM, Silouan Philip Thompson wrote:
      > Please forgive the off-topic post; this is the only place I know I can
      > reach Russian speakers.
      >
      > My college is sending out Christmas cards; on the cover it will say
      > "Rejoice!" in many languages. We've gotten two answers on how that would
      > go in Russian:
      >
      > * ??????????!
      > * ?????????!
      >
      > Is either of these how you would actually say it? Is one more appropriate?
      >
      > (I'm Orthodox so the Powers That Be thought I was likeliest to be able
      > to track down an actual Russian to ask.)
      >
      > Thanks for any help you care to lend!
      >
      > - Deacon Silouan
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      >
      > Post message: ustav@yahoogroups.com
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      > URL to archives: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ustav
      >
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      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • stephen_r1937
      Radovat sya is the infinitive. The imperative: Raduytesya (pl.) or Raduysya (sing.) If I try to send Cyrillic, it will come out as gibberish. Stephen
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 4, 2012
        Radovat'sya is the infinitive.

        The imperative: Raduytesya (pl.) or Raduysya (sing.) If I try to send Cyrillic, it will come out as gibberish.

        Stephen

        --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, Silouan Philip Thompson <himself@...> wrote:
        >
        > This showed up in my in box with no Cyrillic text. I meant to ask:
        > * Radovat'sya!
        > * Raduites'!
        > * Or something else entirely?
        >
        > Thanks again,
        > DnS.
        >
        >
        > On 11/29/12 5:45 PM, Silouan Philip Thompson wrote:
        > > Please forgive the off-topic post; this is the only place I know I can
        > > reach Russian speakers.
        > >
        > > My college is sending out Christmas cards; on the cover it will say
        > > "Rejoice!" in many languages. We've gotten two answers on how that would
        > > go in Russian:
        > >
        > > * ??????????!
        > > * ?????????!
        > >
        > > Is either of these how you would actually say it? Is one more appropriate?
        > >
        > > (I'm Orthodox so the Powers That Be thought I was likeliest to be able
        > > to track down an actual Russian to ask.)
        > >
        > > Thanks for any help you care to lend!
        > >
        > > - Deacon Silouan
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > >
        > > Post message: ustav@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subscribe: ustav-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > > Unsubscribe: ustav-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > > CONTACT LIST OWNER: ustav-owner@yahoogroups.com
        > > URL to archives: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ustav
        > >
        > > More ustav information and service texts:
        > > http://www.orthodox.net/ustav
        > > http://www.orthodox.net/services
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • stephen_r1937
        Look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bogoroditse.jpg It is the third word in the Slavonic text, given here is real Slavonic Cyrillic. Stephen
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 4, 2012
          Look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bogoroditse.jpg

          It is the third word in the Slavonic text, given here is real Slavonic Cyrillic.

          Stephen

          --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@...> wrote:
          >
          > Radovat'sya is the infinitive.
          >
          > The imperative: Raduytesya (pl.) or Raduysya (sing.) If I try to send Cyrillic, it will come out as gibberish.
          >
          > Stephen
          >
        • stephen_r1937
          And here you will find the plural in Civil letters: http://files.seminaria.ru/notes/bortn_concerts/13.pdf Stephen
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 4, 2012
            And here you will find the plural in Civil letters:

            http://files.seminaria.ru/notes/bortn_concerts/13.pdf

            Stephen

            --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@...> wrote:
            >
            > Look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bogoroditse.jpg
            >
            > It is the third word in the Slavonic text, given here is real Slavonic Cyrillic.
            >
            > Stephen
            >
            > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Radovat'sya is the infinitive.
            > >
            > > The imperative: Raduytesya (pl.) or Raduysya (sing.) If I try to send Cyrillic, it will come out as gibberish.
            > >
            > > Stephen
            > >
            >
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