Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [ustav] Re: Seven-Bow Beginning

Expand Messages
  • WILLIAM BAUMGARTH
    Christ is in our midst! In the Old Rite, were/are the laity expected to pray Great or Middle Compline during the relevant fasts in place of Small Compline?
    Message 1 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Christ is in our midst!
      In the Old Rite, were/are the laity expected to pray Great or Middle
      Compline during the relevant fasts in place of Small Compline?
      Sincerely,
      Deacon Patrick

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • stephen_r1937
      Thank you for troubling yourself with this, Nikita. I was familiar with these twelve prayers from the Erie book, but had no idea that they were really a
      Message 2 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Thank you for troubling yourself with this, Nikita. I was familiar with these twelve prayers from the Erie book, but had no idea that they were really a twelve-bow beginning for the cell rule.

        Interesting also that Optina's third petition (of four) runs together what elsewhere appears as two distinct petitions. Apparently once the Old Rite had been disturbed, there was a lot of leeway in prayer rules, which were not in the official New-Rite books, so each community revised the tradition in its own way.

        I have also been looking for the (usually) ten prayers in the morning and evening prayers of Russian New Rite prayer books, looking to see if I could find them in Greek, and while one or two have appeared I have not yet found any collection of all of them together. Here too there is some variety; those in the St Tikhon's prayer book are not exactly the same as those in the Jordanville prayer book. Of course they don't appear in the Erie prayer book at all.

        Again, thanks for clarifying this rather obscure subject.

        Stephen

        --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@...> wrote:
        >
        > I just got home from church and did a fairly thorough search on the Internet and found the 12 bows at:
        > http://www.molitvoslov.com/text1001.htm
        > In addition, they are incorporated *erroneously* into the Morning Prayers found in the Old Rite Prayer Book published by the parish in Erie. I was directly involved in the production of the first edition of this book and I was opposed to this hybridization, but the clergy decided to do this because they felt there was a distinct lack of morning prayers for lay people in the Old Rite. (Well, this may be true, but that is because the Midnight Office is the proper form of morning prayers, both in the Old Rite and in the Byzantine (Greek) Rite. The New Rite derives its Morning and Evening Prayers from Uniate-influenced Ukrainian sources -- a historical fact, not a judgment.)
        >
        > Nikita
        >
        > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Now that is fascinating. Can we find the twelve-bow beginning on line?
        > >
        > > Stephen
        > >
        > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > The Seven Bow Beginning as it is known in the New Rite is a remnant of the official Order of the Cell Rule, a monastic prayer service which is rarely encountered in modern prayer books for laity. In the Russian Old Rite we still have these prayers, but there are actually twelve in the Old Rite, and the order is a little different. The New Rite is actually a reduction of the 12 to 7, and they are a completely different set of prayers from the Old Rite "Entrance and Departure Bows" (which Old Believers typically call "The Seven Bow Beginning", just to make terminology confusing). I can see where one could confuse the two, but they are different entities.
        > > >
        > > > You might ask WHY this 7-Bow Beginning is typically hard to locate in the New Rite. It's because of the collision of two separate liturgical cultures in the 1700s to 1800s in central Russia. After Patriarch Nikon's reforms in the previous century, the monasteries began to be systematically reduced in Russia, until they were almost completely wiped out by orders of the two female monarchs (Catherine and Elizabeth). With the loss of monasticism in the official Church, the need for prayer books to meet their needs dried up. At the same time, new prayer books for laity began to be imported from the Kiev Caves, which embraced a dramatically different set of domestic liturgical practices; for the most part, these Kievan prayer books have displaced the more authentic Muscovite liturgical practices for domestic use of monastics and laity alike. When St. Paisius Velichkovsky helped revive monasticism in Russia, the switch from Muscovite to Kievan culture and ideology had already occurred, and there was not enough interest to restore the older Muscovite practices. This is the legacy that the Russian New Rite has inherited to this day.
        > > >
        > > > There were, however, a few monasteries that attempted to keep the older traditions alive for quite a while longer, and they printed their own Cell Rule books for "in house" use. These all included various sequences of "Beginning Bows". Most notable are the Cell Rules of the monasteries of Sarov, Yuriev, Florishev, Optina and Trinity Lavra, some of which are hybrid rules. (See, for example, the Cell Rule of 500 of the Optina Monastery, which has only a 4-Bow Beginning: http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/cellrule.aspx)
        > > >
        > > > Other differences between the Muscovite and Kievan prayer books are:
        > > > The replacement of Compline and the Midnight Office with special Morning and Evening Prayers for laity; the loss of the monastic Cell Rule; the introduction of newly-composed Akathists; and a completely western ideology of performing complete services of Vespers and Matins in the cells or at home when one is unable to attend church (previously, one read the Psalter or did prostrations or Jesus Prayers instead of "singing in the cell", a practice which was discouraged until Kievan ideology appeared on the scene).
        > > >
        > > > Nikita
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Thank you, Fr Deacon Sergius! I have the Slavonic Jordanville Prayerbook in the 1968 edn (второе дополненное); it's not there. But why then is it so hard to find in any other source? It makes one wonder whether in the 1995 book it wasn't translated from English!
        > > > >
        > > > > Stephen
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "S. Miller" <srbmillerr@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Stephen,
        > > > > >
        > > > > > It does appear in Slavonic in the Slavonic edition of the Jordanville Prayerbook, p.378, 1995 Moscow edition.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Dcn. Sergius
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > In various English-language sources, such as the first edition of the Jordanville Prayer Book, one finds the “Seven-Bow Beginning”:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
        > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
        > > > > > > 3. Thou hast created me; O Lord, have mercy on me.
        > > > > > > 4. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
        > > > > > > 5. My Lady, most holy Theotokos, save me, a sinner.
        > > > > > > 6. Angel, my holy guardian, protect me from all evil.
        > > > > > > 7. Holy N. (one’s patron saint), pray to God for me.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > This is said at the beginning and end of one’s rule of private prayer, with bows from the waist or prostrations, according to the day.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Yesterday I looked for the Slavonic text of this rule by googling “semipoklonnoe nachalo” (in Cyrillic letters, of course). I was surprised to find it mentioned only in Old-Rite sources, and in the following form:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
        > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
        > > > > > > 3. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
        > > > > > > 4. It is truly meet to bless thee, O Theotokos, ever blessed and most immaculate and the Mother of our God. More honorable than the cherubim and truly more glorious than the seraphim, who without corruption gavest birth to God the Word, thee do we magnify.
        > > > > > > 5. Glory to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
        > > > > > > 6. Both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
        > > > > > > 7. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > A bow accompanies each item except the fourth, which is always done with a full prostration.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > So according to the Old Rite the Seven Bows consist of the three Entrance Bows, Axion estin in the Old-Rite text, the small doxology divided, and a three-fold Kyrie eleison, without the petitions to the Theotokos, the Guardian Angel, and the Patron Saint.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > So far I have been unable to find the Slavonic original of the “Seven-Bow Beginning” presented in English-language prayer books.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Can anyone shed light on this?
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • starina77
        I don t think that Old Rite laity are expected (or obligated) to pray Great or Middle Compline at home during fasts, but I do know some people that try to do
        Message 3 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          I don't think that Old Rite laity are expected (or obligated) to pray Great or Middle Compline at home during fasts, but I do know some people that try to do it at least a few times a week, falling back on Small Compline when energy or time is lacking to observe a longer rule of prayer. Small Compline is expected of everyone, and anything more seems to be voluntary. (The major obstacle to reading Great Compline is that not every family owns a copy of the Chasoslov.)

          Nikita

          --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, WILLIAM BAUMGARTH <BAUMGARTH@...> wrote:
          >
          > Christ is in our midst!
          > In the Old Rite, were/are the laity expected to pray Great or Middle
          > Compline during the relevant fasts in place of Small Compline?
          > Sincerely,
          > Deacon Patrick
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • starina77
          I wonder if anyone has ever done a thorough study of the sources or origins of the morning and evening prayers in the New Rite prayer books. As you say, a few
          Message 4 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            I wonder if anyone has ever done a thorough study of the sources or origins of the morning and evening prayers in the New Rite prayer books. As you say, a few can be easily identified, but the rest seem to be a mystery that begs to be solved. Any willing seminarians looking for a good research topic?

            --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thank you for troubling yourself with this, Nikita. I was familiar with these twelve prayers from the Erie book, but had no idea that they were really a twelve-bow beginning for the cell rule.
            >
            > Interesting also that Optina's third petition (of four) runs together what elsewhere appears as two distinct petitions. Apparently once the Old Rite had been disturbed, there was a lot of leeway in prayer rules, which were not in the official New-Rite books, so each community revised the tradition in its own way.
            >
            > I have also been looking for the (usually) ten prayers in the morning and evening prayers of Russian New Rite prayer books, looking to see if I could find them in Greek, and while one or two have appeared I have not yet found any collection of all of them together. Here too there is some variety; those in the St Tikhon's prayer book are not exactly the same as those in the Jordanville prayer book. Of course they don't appear in the Erie prayer book at all.
            >
            > Again, thanks for clarifying this rather obscure subject.
            >
            > Stephen
            >
            > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I just got home from church and did a fairly thorough search on the Internet and found the 12 bows at:
            > > http://www.molitvoslov.com/text1001.htm
            > > In addition, they are incorporated *erroneously* into the Morning Prayers found in the Old Rite Prayer Book published by the parish in Erie. I was directly involved in the production of the first edition of this book and I was opposed to this hybridization, but the clergy decided to do this because they felt there was a distinct lack of morning prayers for lay people in the Old Rite. (Well, this may be true, but that is because the Midnight Office is the proper form of morning prayers, both in the Old Rite and in the Byzantine (Greek) Rite. The New Rite derives its Morning and Evening Prayers from Uniate-influenced Ukrainian sources -- a historical fact, not a judgment.)
            > >
            > > Nikita
            > >
            > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Now that is fascinating. Can we find the twelve-bow beginning on line?
            > > >
            > > > Stephen
            > > >
            > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > The Seven Bow Beginning as it is known in the New Rite is a remnant of the official Order of the Cell Rule, a monastic prayer service which is rarely encountered in modern prayer books for laity. In the Russian Old Rite we still have these prayers, but there are actually twelve in the Old Rite, and the order is a little different. The New Rite is actually a reduction of the 12 to 7, and they are a completely different set of prayers from the Old Rite "Entrance and Departure Bows" (which Old Believers typically call "The Seven Bow Beginning", just to make terminology confusing). I can see where one could confuse the two, but they are different entities.
            > > > >
            > > > > You might ask WHY this 7-Bow Beginning is typically hard to locate in the New Rite. It's because of the collision of two separate liturgical cultures in the 1700s to 1800s in central Russia. After Patriarch Nikon's reforms in the previous century, the monasteries began to be systematically reduced in Russia, until they were almost completely wiped out by orders of the two female monarchs (Catherine and Elizabeth). With the loss of monasticism in the official Church, the need for prayer books to meet their needs dried up. At the same time, new prayer books for laity began to be imported from the Kiev Caves, which embraced a dramatically different set of domestic liturgical practices; for the most part, these Kievan prayer books have displaced the more authentic Muscovite liturgical practices for domestic use of monastics and laity alike. When St. Paisius Velichkovsky helped revive monasticism in Russia, the switch from Muscovite to Kievan culture and ideology had already occurred, and there was not enough interest to restore the older Muscovite practices. This is the legacy that the Russian New Rite has inherited to this day.
            > > > >
            > > > > There were, however, a few monasteries that attempted to keep the older traditions alive for quite a while longer, and they printed their own Cell Rule books for "in house" use. These all included various sequences of "Beginning Bows". Most notable are the Cell Rules of the monasteries of Sarov, Yuriev, Florishev, Optina and Trinity Lavra, some of which are hybrid rules. (See, for example, the Cell Rule of 500 of the Optina Monastery, which has only a 4-Bow Beginning: http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/cellrule.aspx)
            > > > >
            > > > > Other differences between the Muscovite and Kievan prayer books are:
            > > > > The replacement of Compline and the Midnight Office with special Morning and Evening Prayers for laity; the loss of the monastic Cell Rule; the introduction of newly-composed Akathists; and a completely western ideology of performing complete services of Vespers and Matins in the cells or at home when one is unable to attend church (previously, one read the Psalter or did prostrations or Jesus Prayers instead of "singing in the cell", a practice which was discouraged until Kievan ideology appeared on the scene).
            > > > >
            > > > > Nikita
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Thank you, Fr Deacon Sergius! I have the Slavonic Jordanville Prayerbook in the 1968 edn (второе дополненное); it's not there. But why then is it so hard to find in any other source? It makes one wonder whether in the 1995 book it wasn't translated from English!
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Stephen
            > > > > >
            > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "S. Miller" <srbmillerr@> wrote:
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Stephen,
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > It does appear in Slavonic in the Slavonic edition of the Jordanville Prayerbook, p.378, 1995 Moscow edition.
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Dcn. Sergius
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > In various English-language sources, such as the first edition of the Jordanville Prayer Book, one finds the “Seven-Bow Beginning”:
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
            > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
            > > > > > > > 3. Thou hast created me; O Lord, have mercy on me.
            > > > > > > > 4. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
            > > > > > > > 5. My Lady, most holy Theotokos, save me, a sinner.
            > > > > > > > 6. Angel, my holy guardian, protect me from all evil.
            > > > > > > > 7. Holy N. (one’s patron saint), pray to God for me.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > This is said at the beginning and end of one’s rule of private prayer, with bows from the waist or prostrations, according to the day.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Yesterday I looked for the Slavonic text of this rule by googling “semipoklonnoe nachalo” (in Cyrillic letters, of course). I was surprised to find it mentioned only in Old-Rite sources, and in the following form:
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
            > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
            > > > > > > > 3. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
            > > > > > > > 4. It is truly meet to bless thee, O Theotokos, ever blessed and most immaculate and the Mother of our God. More honorable than the cherubim and truly more glorious than the seraphim, who without corruption gavest birth to God the Word, thee do we magnify.
            > > > > > > > 5. Glory to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
            > > > > > > > 6. Both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
            > > > > > > > 7. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > A bow accompanies each item except the fourth, which is always done with a full prostration.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > So according to the Old Rite the Seven Bows consist of the three Entrance Bows, Axion estin in the Old-Rite text, the small doxology divided, and a three-fold Kyrie eleison, without the petitions to the Theotokos, the Guardian Angel, and the Patron Saint.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > So far I have been unable to find the Slavonic original of the “Seven-Bow Beginning” presented in English-language prayer books.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Can anyone shed light on this?
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Christopher Swanson
            Along those same lines are there any studies on the development of the prayers before communion? ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Along those same lines are there any studies on the development of the
              prayers before communion?

              On Mon, Apr 11, 2011 at 4:18 PM, starina77 <starina77@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              > I wonder if anyone has ever done a thorough study of the sources or origins
              > of the morning and evening prayers in the New Rite prayer books. As you say,
              > a few can be easily identified, but the rest seem to be a mystery that begs
              > to be solved. Any willing seminarians looking for a good research topic?
              >
              >
              > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Thank you for troubling yourself with this, Nikita. I was familiar with
              > these twelve prayers from the Erie book, but had no idea that they were
              > really a twelve-bow beginning for the cell rule.
              > >
              > > Interesting also that Optina's third petition (of four) runs together
              > what elsewhere appears as two distinct petitions. Apparently once the Old
              > Rite had been disturbed, there was a lot of leeway in prayer rules, which
              > were not in the official New-Rite books, so each community revised the
              > tradition in its own way.
              > >
              > > I have also been looking for the (usually) ten prayers in the morning and
              > evening prayers of Russian New Rite prayer books, looking to see if I could
              > find them in Greek, and while one or two have appeared I have not yet found
              > any collection of all of them together. Here too there is some variety;
              > those in the St Tikhon's prayer book are not exactly the same as those in
              > the Jordanville prayer book. Of course they don't appear in the Erie prayer
              > book at all.
              > >
              > > Again, thanks for clarifying this rather obscure subject.
              > >
              > > Stephen
              > >
              > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > I just got home from church and did a fairly thorough search on the
              > Internet and found the 12 bows at:
              > > > http://www.molitvoslov.com/text1001.htm
              > > > In addition, they are incorporated *erroneously* into the Morning
              > Prayers found in the Old Rite Prayer Book published by the parish in Erie. I
              > was directly involved in the production of the first edition of this book
              > and I was opposed to this hybridization, but the clergy decided to do this
              > because they felt there was a distinct lack of morning prayers for lay
              > people in the Old Rite. (Well, this may be true, but that is because the
              > Midnight Office is the proper form of morning prayers, both in the Old Rite
              > and in the Byzantine (Greek) Rite. The New Rite derives its Morning and
              > Evening Prayers from Uniate-influenced Ukrainian sources -- a historical
              > fact, not a judgment.)
              > > >
              > > > Nikita
              > > >
              > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > Now that is fascinating. Can we find the twelve-bow beginning on
              > line?
              > > > >
              > > > > Stephen
              > > > >
              > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
              > > > > >
              > > > > > The Seven Bow Beginning as it is known in the New Rite is a remnant
              > of the official Order of the Cell Rule, a monastic prayer service which is
              > rarely encountered in modern prayer books for laity. In the Russian Old Rite
              > we still have these prayers, but there are actually twelve in the Old Rite,
              > and the order is a little different. The New Rite is actually a reduction of
              > the 12 to 7, and they are a completely different set of prayers from the Old
              > Rite "Entrance and Departure Bows" (which Old Believers typically call "The
              > Seven Bow Beginning", just to make terminology confusing). I can see where
              > one could confuse the two, but they are different entities.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > You might ask WHY this 7-Bow Beginning is typically hard to locate
              > in the New Rite. It's because of the collision of two separate liturgical
              > cultures in the 1700s to 1800s in central Russia. After Patriarch Nikon's
              > reforms in the previous century, the monasteries began to be systematically
              > reduced in Russia, until they were almost completely wiped out by orders of
              > the two female monarchs (Catherine and Elizabeth). With the loss of
              > monasticism in the official Church, the need for prayer books to meet their
              > needs dried up. At the same time, new prayer books for laity began to be
              > imported from the Kiev Caves, which embraced a dramatically different set of
              > domestic liturgical practices; for the most part, these Kievan prayer books
              > have displaced the more authentic Muscovite liturgical practices for
              > domestic use of monastics and laity alike. When St. Paisius Velichkovsky
              > helped revive monasticism in Russia, the switch from Muscovite to Kievan
              > culture and ideology had already occurred, and there was not enough interest
              > to restore the older Muscovite practices. This is the legacy that the
              > Russian New Rite has inherited to this day.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > There were, however, a few monasteries that attempted to keep the
              > older traditions alive for quite a while longer, and they printed their own
              > Cell Rule books for "in house" use. These all included various sequences of
              > "Beginning Bows". Most notable are the Cell Rules of the monasteries of
              > Sarov, Yuriev, Florishev, Optina and Trinity Lavra, some of which are hybrid
              > rules. (See, for example, the Cell Rule of 500 of the Optina Monastery,
              > which has only a 4-Bow Beginning:
              > http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/cellrule.aspx)
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Other differences between the Muscovite and Kievan prayer books
              > are:
              > > > > > The replacement of Compline and the Midnight Office with special
              > Morning and Evening Prayers for laity; the loss of the monastic Cell Rule;
              > the introduction of newly-composed Akathists; and a completely western
              > ideology of performing complete services of Vespers and Matins in the cells
              > or at home when one is unable to attend church (previously, one read the
              > Psalter or did prostrations or Jesus Prayers instead of "singing in the
              > cell", a practice which was discouraged until Kievan ideology appeared on
              > the scene).
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Nikita
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@>
              > wrote:
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > Thank you, Fr Deacon Sergius! I have the Slavonic Jordanville
              > Prayerbook in the 1968 edn (второе
              > дополненное);
              > it's not there. But why then is it so hard to find in any other source? It
              > makes one wonder whether in the 1995 book it wasn't translated from English!
              >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > Stephen
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "S. Miller" <srbmillerr@> wrote:
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > Stephen,
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > It does appear in Slavonic in the Slavonic edition of the
              > Jordanville Prayerbook, p.378, 1995 Moscow edition.
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > Dcn. Sergius
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@>
              > wrote:
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > In various English-language sources, such as the first
              > edition of the Jordanville Prayer Book, one finds the ���Seven-Bow
              > Beginning�� :
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
              > > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
              > > > > > > > > 3. Thou hast created me; O Lord, have mercy on me.
              > > > > > > > > 4. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
              > > > > > > > > 5. My Lady, most holy Theotokos, save me, a sinner.
              > > > > > > > > 6. Angel, my holy guardian, protect me from all evil.
              > > > > > > > > 7. Holy N. (one���s patron saint), pray to God for me.
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > This is said at the beginning and end of one���s rule of
              > private prayer, with bows from the waist or prostrations, according to the
              > day.
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > Yesterday I looked for the Slavonic text of this rule by
              > googling ���semipoklonnoe nachalo�� (in Cyrillic letters, of course). I was
              > surprised to find it mentioned only in Old-Rite sources, and in the
              > following form:
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
              > > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
              > > > > > > > > 3. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
              > > > > > > > > 4. It is truly meet to bless thee, O Theotokos, ever blessed
              > and most immaculate and the Mother of our God. More honorable than the
              > cherubim and truly more glorious than the seraphim, who without corruption
              > gavest birth to God the Word, thee do we magnify.
              > > > > > > > > 5. Glory to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
              > > > > > > > > 6. Both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
              > > > > > > > > 7. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > A bow accompanies each item except the fourth, which is
              > always done with a full prostration.
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > So according to the Old Rite the Seven Bows consist of the
              > three Entrance Bows, Axion estin in the Old-Rite text, the small doxology
              > divided, and a three-fold Kyrie eleison, without the petitions to the
              > Theotokos, the Guardian Angel, and the Patron Saint.
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > So far I have been unable to find the Slavonic original of
              > the ���Seven-Bow Beginning�� presented in English-language prayer books.
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > Can anyone shed light on this?
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • starina77
              I m not sure if there have been any studies, but at least the pre- and post-communion prayers exist in all the ethnic and language divisions of Orthodoxy. I
              Message 6 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                I'm not sure if there have been any studies, but at least the pre- and post-communion prayers exist in all the ethnic and language divisions of Orthodoxy. I suspect that these have a more traceable (and stable) lineage.

                --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, Christopher Swanson <frcaws@...> wrote:
                >
                > Along those same lines are there any studies on the development of the
                > prayers before communion?
                >
                > On Mon, Apr 11, 2011 at 4:18 PM, starina77 <starina77@...> wrote:
                >
                > >
                > >
                > > I wonder if anyone has ever done a thorough study of the sources or origins
                > > of the morning and evening prayers in the New Rite prayer books. As you say,
                > > a few can be easily identified, but the rest seem to be a mystery that begs
                > > to be solved. Any willing seminarians looking for a good research topic?
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Thank you for troubling yourself with this, Nikita. I was familiar with
                > > these twelve prayers from the Erie book, but had no idea that they were
                > > really a twelve-bow beginning for the cell rule.
                > > >
                > > > Interesting also that Optina's third petition (of four) runs together
                > > what elsewhere appears as two distinct petitions. Apparently once the Old
                > > Rite had been disturbed, there was a lot of leeway in prayer rules, which
                > > were not in the official New-Rite books, so each community revised the
                > > tradition in its own way.
                > > >
                > > > I have also been looking for the (usually) ten prayers in the morning and
                > > evening prayers of Russian New Rite prayer books, looking to see if I could
                > > find them in Greek, and while one or two have appeared I have not yet found
                > > any collection of all of them together. Here too there is some variety;
                > > those in the St Tikhon's prayer book are not exactly the same as those in
                > > the Jordanville prayer book. Of course they don't appear in the Erie prayer
                > > book at all.
                > > >
                > > > Again, thanks for clarifying this rather obscure subject.
                > > >
                > > > Stephen
                > > >
                > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > I just got home from church and did a fairly thorough search on the
                > > Internet and found the 12 bows at:
                > > > > http://www.molitvoslov.com/text1001.htm
                > > > > In addition, they are incorporated *erroneously* into the Morning
                > > Prayers found in the Old Rite Prayer Book published by the parish in Erie. I
                > > was directly involved in the production of the first edition of this book
                > > and I was opposed to this hybridization, but the clergy decided to do this
                > > because they felt there was a distinct lack of morning prayers for lay
                > > people in the Old Rite. (Well, this may be true, but that is because the
                > > Midnight Office is the proper form of morning prayers, both in the Old Rite
                > > and in the Byzantine (Greek) Rite. The New Rite derives its Morning and
                > > Evening Prayers from Uniate-influenced Ukrainian sources -- a historical
                > > fact, not a judgment.)
                > > > >
                > > > > Nikita
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Now that is fascinating. Can we find the twelve-bow beginning on
                > > line?
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Stephen
                > > > > >
                > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > The Seven Bow Beginning as it is known in the New Rite is a remnant
                > > of the official Order of the Cell Rule, a monastic prayer service which is
                > > rarely encountered in modern prayer books for laity. In the Russian Old Rite
                > > we still have these prayers, but there are actually twelve in the Old Rite,
                > > and the order is a little different. The New Rite is actually a reduction of
                > > the 12 to 7, and they are a completely different set of prayers from the Old
                > > Rite "Entrance and Departure Bows" (which Old Believers typically call "The
                > > Seven Bow Beginning", just to make terminology confusing). I can see where
                > > one could confuse the two, but they are different entities.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > You might ask WHY this 7-Bow Beginning is typically hard to locate
                > > in the New Rite. It's because of the collision of two separate liturgical
                > > cultures in the 1700s to 1800s in central Russia. After Patriarch Nikon's
                > > reforms in the previous century, the monasteries began to be systematically
                > > reduced in Russia, until they were almost completely wiped out by orders of
                > > the two female monarchs (Catherine and Elizabeth). With the loss of
                > > monasticism in the official Church, the need for prayer books to meet their
                > > needs dried up. At the same time, new prayer books for laity began to be
                > > imported from the Kiev Caves, which embraced a dramatically different set of
                > > domestic liturgical practices; for the most part, these Kievan prayer books
                > > have displaced the more authentic Muscovite liturgical practices for
                > > domestic use of monastics and laity alike. When St. Paisius Velichkovsky
                > > helped revive monasticism in Russia, the switch from Muscovite to Kievan
                > > culture and ideology had already occurred, and there was not enough interest
                > > to restore the older Muscovite practices. This is the legacy that the
                > > Russian New Rite has inherited to this day.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > There were, however, a few monasteries that attempted to keep the
                > > older traditions alive for quite a while longer, and they printed their own
                > > Cell Rule books for "in house" use. These all included various sequences of
                > > "Beginning Bows". Most notable are the Cell Rules of the monasteries of
                > > Sarov, Yuriev, Florishev, Optina and Trinity Lavra, some of which are hybrid
                > > rules. (See, for example, the Cell Rule of 500 of the Optina Monastery,
                > > which has only a 4-Bow Beginning:
                > > http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/cellrule.aspx)
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Other differences between the Muscovite and Kievan prayer books
                > > are:
                > > > > > > The replacement of Compline and the Midnight Office with special
                > > Morning and Evening Prayers for laity; the loss of the monastic Cell Rule;
                > > the introduction of newly-composed Akathists; and a completely western
                > > ideology of performing complete services of Vespers and Matins in the cells
                > > or at home when one is unable to attend church (previously, one read the
                > > Psalter or did prostrations or Jesus Prayers instead of "singing in the
                > > cell", a practice which was discouraged until Kievan ideology appeared on
                > > the scene).
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Nikita
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@>
                > > wrote:
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > Thank you, Fr Deacon Sergius! I have the Slavonic Jordanville
                > > Prayerbook in the 1968 edn (второе
                > > дополненное);
                > > it's not there. But why then is it so hard to find in any other source? It
                > > makes one wonder whether in the 1995 book it wasn't translated from English!
                > >
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > Stephen
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "S. Miller" <srbmillerr@> wrote:
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > Stephen,
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > It does appear in Slavonic in the Slavonic edition of the
                > > Jordanville Prayerbook, p.378, 1995 Moscow edition.
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > Dcn. Sergius
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@>
                > > wrote:
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > In various English-language sources, such as the first
                > > edition of the Jordanville Prayer Book, one finds the “Seven-Bow
                > > Beginning†:
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                > > > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                > > > > > > > > > 3. Thou hast created me; O Lord, have mercy on me.
                > > > > > > > > > 4. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                > > > > > > > > > 5. My Lady, most holy Theotokos, save me, a sinner.
                > > > > > > > > > 6. Angel, my holy guardian, protect me from all evil.
                > > > > > > > > > 7. Holy N. (one’s patron saint), pray to God for me.
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > This is said at the beginning and end of one’s rule of
                > > private prayer, with bows from the waist or prostrations, according to the
                > > day.
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > Yesterday I looked for the Slavonic text of this rule by
                > > googling “semipoklonnoe nachalo†(in Cyrillic letters, of course). I was
                > > surprised to find it mentioned only in Old-Rite sources, and in the
                > > following form:
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                > > > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                > > > > > > > > > 3. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                > > > > > > > > > 4. It is truly meet to bless thee, O Theotokos, ever blessed
                > > and most immaculate and the Mother of our God. More honorable than the
                > > cherubim and truly more glorious than the seraphim, who without corruption
                > > gavest birth to God the Word, thee do we magnify.
                > > > > > > > > > 5. Glory to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
                > > > > > > > > > 6. Both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
                > > > > > > > > > 7. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > A bow accompanies each item except the fourth, which is
                > > always done with a full prostration.
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > So according to the Old Rite the Seven Bows consist of the
                > > three Entrance Bows, Axion estin in the Old-Rite text, the small doxology
                > > divided, and a three-fold Kyrie eleison, without the petitions to the
                > > Theotokos, the Guardian Angel, and the Patron Saint.
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > So far I have been unable to find the Slavonic original of
                > > the “Seven-Bow Beginning†presented in English-language prayer books.
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > > > Can anyone shed light on this?
                > > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > > >
                > > > > > > >
                > > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Christopher Swanson
                I suspect they do. Just curious about their origin and development. The attributions of the various prayers are always interesting to me. ... [Non-text
                Message 7 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  I suspect they do. Just curious about their origin and development. The
                  attributions of the various prayers are always interesting to me.

                  On Mon, Apr 11, 2011 at 4:33 PM, starina77 <starina77@...> wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  > I'm not sure if there have been any studies, but at least the pre- and
                  > post-communion prayers exist in all the ethnic and language divisions of
                  > Orthodoxy. I suspect that these have a more traceable (and stable) lineage.
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, Christopher Swanson <frcaws@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Along those same lines are there any studies on the development of the
                  > > prayers before communion?
                  > >
                  > > On Mon, Apr 11, 2011 at 4:18 PM, starina77 <starina77@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > I wonder if anyone has ever done a thorough study of the sources or
                  > origins
                  > > > of the morning and evening prayers in the New Rite prayer books. As you
                  > say,
                  > > > a few can be easily identified, but the rest seem to be a mystery that
                  > begs
                  > > > to be solved. Any willing seminarians looking for a good research
                  > topic?
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Thank you for troubling yourself with this, Nikita. I was familiar
                  > with
                  > > > these twelve prayers from the Erie book, but had no idea that they were
                  > > > really a twelve-bow beginning for the cell rule.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Interesting also that Optina's third petition (of four) runs together
                  > > > what elsewhere appears as two distinct petitions. Apparently once the
                  > Old
                  > > > Rite had been disturbed, there was a lot of leeway in prayer rules,
                  > which
                  > > > were not in the official New-Rite books, so each community revised the
                  > > > tradition in its own way.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I have also been looking for the (usually) ten prayers in the morning
                  > and
                  > > > evening prayers of Russian New Rite prayer books, looking to see if I
                  > could
                  > > > find them in Greek, and while one or two have appeared I have not yet
                  > found
                  > > > any collection of all of them together. Here too there is some variety;
                  > > > those in the St Tikhon's prayer book are not exactly the same as those
                  > in
                  > > > the Jordanville prayer book. Of course they don't appear in the Erie
                  > prayer
                  > > > book at all.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Again, thanks for clarifying this rather obscure subject.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Stephen
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > I just got home from church and did a fairly thorough search on the
                  > > > Internet and found the 12 bows at:
                  > > > > > http://www.molitvoslov.com/text1001.htm
                  > > > > > In addition, they are incorporated *erroneously* into the Morning
                  > > > Prayers found in the Old Rite Prayer Book published by the parish in
                  > Erie. I
                  > > > was directly involved in the production of the first edition of this
                  > book
                  > > > and I was opposed to this hybridization, but the clergy decided to do
                  > this
                  > > > because they felt there was a distinct lack of morning prayers for lay
                  > > > people in the Old Rite. (Well, this may be true, but that is because
                  > the
                  > > > Midnight Office is the proper form of morning prayers, both in the Old
                  > Rite
                  > > > and in the Byzantine (Greek) Rite. The New Rite derives its Morning and
                  > > > Evening Prayers from Uniate-influenced Ukrainian sources -- a
                  > historical
                  > > > fact, not a judgment.)
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Nikita
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@>
                  > wrote:
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Now that is fascinating. Can we find the twelve-bow beginning on
                  > > > line?
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Stephen
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > The Seven Bow Beginning as it is known in the New Rite is a
                  > remnant
                  > > > of the official Order of the Cell Rule, a monastic prayer service which
                  > is
                  > > > rarely encountered in modern prayer books for laity. In the Russian Old
                  > Rite
                  > > > we still have these prayers, but there are actually twelve in the Old
                  > Rite,
                  > > > and the order is a little different. The New Rite is actually a
                  > reduction of
                  > > > the 12 to 7, and they are a completely different set of prayers from
                  > the Old
                  > > > Rite "Entrance and Departure Bows" (which Old Believers typically call
                  > "The
                  > > > Seven Bow Beginning", just to make terminology confusing). I can see
                  > where
                  > > > one could confuse the two, but they are different entities.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > You might ask WHY this 7-Bow Beginning is typically hard to
                  > locate
                  > > > in the New Rite. It's because of the collision of two separate
                  > liturgical
                  > > > cultures in the 1700s to 1800s in central Russia. After Patriarch
                  > Nikon's
                  > > > reforms in the previous century, the monasteries began to be
                  > systematically
                  > > > reduced in Russia, until they were almost completely wiped out by
                  > orders of
                  > > > the two female monarchs (Catherine and Elizabeth). With the loss of
                  > > > monasticism in the official Church, the need for prayer books to meet
                  > their
                  > > > needs dried up. At the same time, new prayer books for laity began to
                  > be
                  > > > imported from the Kiev Caves, which embraced a dramatically different
                  > set of
                  > > > domestic liturgical practices; for the most part, these Kievan prayer
                  > books
                  > > > have displaced the more authentic Muscovite liturgical practices for
                  > > > domestic use of monastics and laity alike. When St. Paisius
                  > Velichkovsky
                  > > > helped revive monasticism in Russia, the switch from Muscovite to
                  > Kievan
                  > > > culture and ideology had already occurred, and there was not enough
                  > interest
                  > > > to restore the older Muscovite practices. This is the legacy that the
                  > > > Russian New Rite has inherited to this day.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > There were, however, a few monasteries that attempted to keep
                  > the
                  > > > older traditions alive for quite a while longer, and they printed their
                  > own
                  > > > Cell Rule books for "in house" use. These all included various
                  > sequences of
                  > > > "Beginning Bows". Most notable are the Cell Rules of the monasteries of
                  > > > Sarov, Yuriev, Florishev, Optina and Trinity Lavra, some of which are
                  > hybrid
                  > > > rules. (See, for example, the Cell Rule of 500 of the Optina Monastery,
                  > > > which has only a 4-Bow Beginning:
                  > > > http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/cellrule.aspx)
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Other differences between the Muscovite and Kievan prayer books
                  > > > are:
                  > > > > > > > The replacement of Compline and the Midnight Office with
                  > special
                  > > > Morning and Evening Prayers for laity; the loss of the monastic Cell
                  > Rule;
                  > > > the introduction of newly-composed Akathists; and a completely western
                  > > > ideology of performing complete services of Vespers and Matins in the
                  > cells
                  > > > or at home when one is unable to attend church (previously, one read
                  > the
                  > > > Psalter or did prostrations or Jesus Prayers instead of "singing in the
                  > > > cell", a practice which was discouraged until Kievan ideology appeared
                  > on
                  > > > the scene).
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Nikita
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@>
                  > > > wrote:
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > Thank you, Fr Deacon Sergius! I have the Slavonic Jordanville
                  > > > Prayerbook in the 1968 edn (второе
                  > > >
                  > дополненное);
                  > > > it's not there. But why then is it so hard to find in any other source?
                  > It
                  > > > makes one wonder whether in the 1995 book it wasn't translated from
                  > English!
                  > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > Stephen
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "S. Miller" <srbmillerr@>
                  > wrote:
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > Stephen,
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > It does appear in Slavonic in the Slavonic edition of the
                  > > > Jordanville Prayerbook, p.378, 1995 Moscow edition.
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > Dcn. Sergius
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937"
                  > <stephen_r1937@>
                  > > > wrote:
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > In various English-language sources, such as the first
                  > > > edition of the Jordanville Prayer Book, one finds the ���Seven-Bow
                  > > > Beginning�� :
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 3. Thou hast created me; O Lord, have mercy on me.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 4. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 5. My Lady, most holy Theotokos, save me, a sinner.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 6. Angel, my holy guardian, protect me from all evil.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 7. Holy N. (one���s patron saint), pray to God for me.
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > This is said at the beginning and end of one���s rule of
                  > > > private prayer, with bows from the waist or prostrations, according to
                  > the
                  > > > day.
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > Yesterday I looked for the Slavonic text of this rule by
                  > > > googling ���semipoklonnoe nachalo�� (in Cyrillic letters, of course). I
                  > was
                  > > > surprised to find it mentioned only in Old-Rite sources, and in the
                  > > > following form:
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 3. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 4. It is truly meet to bless thee, O Theotokos, ever
                  > blessed
                  > > > and most immaculate and the Mother of our God. More honorable than the
                  > > > cherubim and truly more glorious than the seraphim, who without
                  > corruption
                  > > > gavest birth to God the Word, thee do we magnify.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 5. Glory to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 6. Both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
                  > > > > > > > > > > 7. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > A bow accompanies each item except the fourth, which is
                  > > > always done with a full prostration.
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > So according to the Old Rite the Seven Bows consist of
                  > the
                  > > > three Entrance Bows, Axion estin in the Old-Rite text, the small
                  > doxology
                  > > > divided, and a three-fold Kyrie eleison, without the petitions to the
                  > > > Theotokos, the Guardian Angel, and the Patron Saint.
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > So far I have been unable to find the Slavonic original
                  > of
                  > > > the ���Seven-Bow Beginning�� presented in English-language prayer
                  > books.
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > > > Can anyone shed light on this?
                  > > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Philip Silouan Thompson
                  Here s Morning and Evening Prayer Rules in the Russian Orthodox Tradition by Fr. Sergei Sveshnikov: http://preview.tinyurl.com/yapb6yx - Silouan
                  Message 8 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Here's "Morning and Evening Prayer Rules in the Russian Orthodox
                    Tradition" by Fr. Sergei Sveshnikov: http://preview.tinyurl.com/yapb6yx

                    - Silouan


                    On 4/11/11 4:18 PM, starina77 wrote:
                    > I wonder if anyone has ever done a thorough study of the sources or origins of the morning and evening prayers in the New Rite prayer books. As you say, a few can be easily identified, but the rest seem to be a mystery that begs to be solved. Any willing seminarians looking for a good research topic?
                  • David
                    Dear Nikita: Thank you for this information, and for the link to the molitvoslov site, especially to the Old Rite order for the Cell Rule. I m a little
                    Message 9 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Dear Nikita:

                      Thank you for this information, and for the link to the molitvoslov site, especially to the Old Rite order for the Cell Rule. I'm a little confused about how the cell rule fits together with the order for reading the psalter in the cell. Does one finish the cell rule with the dismissal as given on the molitvoslov site and start the other, as printed in the psalter, or can they be integrated in some fashion?

                      David

                      --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Thank you for troubling yourself with this, Nikita. I was familiar with these twelve prayers from the Erie book, but had no idea that they were really a twelve-bow beginning for the cell rule.
                      >
                      > Interesting also that Optina's third petition (of four) runs together what elsewhere appears as two distinct petitions. Apparently once the Old Rite had been disturbed, there was a lot of leeway in prayer rules, which were not in the official New-Rite books, so each community revised the tradition in its own way.
                      >
                      > I have also been looking for the (usually) ten prayers in the morning and evening prayers of Russian New Rite prayer books, looking to see if I could find them in Greek, and while one or two have appeared I have not yet found any collection of all of them together. Here too there is some variety; those in the St Tikhon's prayer book are not exactly the same as those in the Jordanville prayer book. Of course they don't appear in the Erie prayer book at all.
                      >
                      > Again, thanks for clarifying this rather obscure subject.
                      >
                      > Stephen
                      >
                      > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I just got home from church and did a fairly thorough search on the Internet and found the 12 bows at:
                      > > http://www.molitvoslov.com/text1001.htm
                      > > In addition, they are incorporated *erroneously* into the Morning Prayers found in the Old Rite Prayer Book published by the parish in Erie. I was directly involved in the production of the first edition of this book and I was opposed to this hybridization, but the clergy decided to do this because they felt there was a distinct lack of morning prayers for lay people in the Old Rite. (Well, this may be true, but that is because the Midnight Office is the proper form of morning prayers, both in the Old Rite and in the Byzantine (Greek) Rite. The New Rite derives its Morning and Evening Prayers from Uniate-influenced Ukrainian sources -- a historical fact, not a judgment.)
                      > >
                      > > Nikita
                      > >
                      > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Now that is fascinating. Can we find the twelve-bow beginning on line?
                      > > >
                      > > > Stephen
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > The Seven Bow Beginning as it is known in the New Rite is a remnant of the official Order of the Cell Rule, a monastic prayer service which is rarely encountered in modern prayer books for laity. In the Russian Old Rite we still have these prayers, but there are actually twelve in the Old Rite, and the order is a little different. The New Rite is actually a reduction of the 12 to 7, and they are a completely different set of prayers from the Old Rite "Entrance and Departure Bows" (which Old Believers typically call "The Seven Bow Beginning", just to make terminology confusing). I can see where one could confuse the two, but they are different entities.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > You might ask WHY this 7-Bow Beginning is typically hard to locate in the New Rite. It's because of the collision of two separate liturgical cultures in the 1700s to 1800s in central Russia. After Patriarch Nikon's reforms in the previous century, the monasteries began to be systematically reduced in Russia, until they were almost completely wiped out by orders of the two female monarchs (Catherine and Elizabeth). With the loss of monasticism in the official Church, the need for prayer books to meet their needs dried up. At the same time, new prayer books for laity began to be imported from the Kiev Caves, which embraced a dramatically different set of domestic liturgical practices; for the most part, these Kievan prayer books have displaced the more authentic Muscovite liturgical practices for domestic use of monastics and laity alike. When St. Paisius Velichkovsky helped revive monasticism in Russia, the switch from Muscovite to Kievan culture and ideology had already occurred, and there was not enough interest to restore the older Muscovite practices. This is the legacy that the Russian New Rite has inherited to this day.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > There were, however, a few monasteries that attempted to keep the older traditions alive for quite a while longer, and they printed their own Cell Rule books for "in house" use. These all included various sequences of "Beginning Bows". Most notable are the Cell Rules of the monasteries of Sarov, Yuriev, Florishev, Optina and Trinity Lavra, some of which are hybrid rules. (See, for example, the Cell Rule of 500 of the Optina Monastery, which has only a 4-Bow Beginning: http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/cellrule.aspx)
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Other differences between the Muscovite and Kievan prayer books are:
                      > > > > The replacement of Compline and the Midnight Office with special Morning and Evening Prayers for laity; the loss of the monastic Cell Rule; the introduction of newly-composed Akathists; and a completely western ideology of performing complete services of Vespers and Matins in the cells or at home when one is unable to attend church (previously, one read the Psalter or did prostrations or Jesus Prayers instead of "singing in the cell", a practice which was discouraged until Kievan ideology appeared on the scene).
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Nikita
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Thank you, Fr Deacon Sergius! I have the Slavonic Jordanville Prayerbook in the 1968 edn (второе дополненное); it's not there. But why then is it so hard to find in any other source? It makes one wonder whether in the 1995 book it wasn't translated from English!
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Stephen
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "S. Miller" <srbmillerr@> wrote:
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > Stephen,
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > It does appear in Slavonic in the Slavonic edition of the Jordanville Prayerbook, p.378, 1995 Moscow edition.
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > Dcn. Sergius
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > In various English-language sources, such as the first edition of the Jordanville Prayer Book, one finds the “Seven-Bow Beginning”:
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                      > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                      > > > > > > > 3. Thou hast created me; O Lord, have mercy on me.
                      > > > > > > > 4. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                      > > > > > > > 5. My Lady, most holy Theotokos, save me, a sinner.
                      > > > > > > > 6. Angel, my holy guardian, protect me from all evil.
                      > > > > > > > 7. Holy N. (one’s patron saint), pray to God for me.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > This is said at the beginning and end of one’s rule of private prayer, with bows from the waist or prostrations, according to the day.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > Yesterday I looked for the Slavonic text of this rule by googling “semipoklonnoe nachalo” (in Cyrillic letters, of course). I was surprised to find it mentioned only in Old-Rite sources, and in the following form:
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                      > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                      > > > > > > > 3. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                      > > > > > > > 4. It is truly meet to bless thee, O Theotokos, ever blessed and most immaculate and the Mother of our God. More honorable than the cherubim and truly more glorious than the seraphim, who without corruption gavest birth to God the Word, thee do we magnify.
                      > > > > > > > 5. Glory to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
                      > > > > > > > 6. Both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
                      > > > > > > > 7. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > A bow accompanies each item except the fourth, which is always done with a full prostration.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > So according to the Old Rite the Seven Bows consist of the three Entrance Bows, Axion estin in the Old-Rite text, the small doxology divided, and a three-fold Kyrie eleison, without the petitions to the Theotokos, the Guardian Angel, and the Patron Saint.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > So far I have been unable to find the Slavonic original of the “Seven-Bow Beginning” presented in English-language prayer books.
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > > Can anyone shed light on this?
                      > > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • frjsilver@verizon.net
                      The question remains: Who is expected to follow the cell rule ? Laity or monastics? Russian old rite vs new rite differences? I ve been a new rite (I
                      Message 10 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        The question remains: Who is expected to follow the 'cell rule'? Laity or monastics?

                        Russian 'old rite' vs 'new rite' differences?

                        I've been a 'new rite' (I think) monk for more than thirty years, and this is all news to me!

                        Monk James




                        Apr 11, 2011 07:49:24 PM, ustav@yahoogroups.com wrote:





                        Dear Nikita:

                        Thank you for this information, and for the link to the molitvoslov site, especially to the Old Rite order for the Cell Rule. I'm a little confused about how the cell rule fits together with the order for reading the psalter in the cell. Does one finish the cell rule with the dismissal as given on the molitvoslov site and start the other, as printed in the psalter, or can they be integrated in some fashion?

                        David

                        --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" wrote:
                        >
                        > Thank you for troubling yourself with this, Nikita. I was familiar with these twelve prayers from the Erie book, but had no idea that they were really a twelve-bow beginning for the cell rule.
                        >
                        > Interesting also that Optina's third petition (of four) runs together what elsewhere appears as two distinct petitions. Apparently once the Old Rite had been disturbed, there was a lot of leeway in prayer rules, which were not in the official New-Rite books, so each community revised the tradition in its own way.
                        >
                        > I have also been looking for the (usually) ten prayers in the morning and evening prayers of Russian New Rite prayer books, looking to see if I could find them in Greek, and while one or two have appeared I have not yet found any collection of all of them together. Here too there is some variety; those in the St Tikhon's prayer book are not exactly the same as those in the Jordanville prayer book. Of course they don't appear in the Erie prayer book at all.
                        >
                        > Again, thanks for clarifying this rather obscure subject.
                        >
                        > Stephen
                        >
                        > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" wrote:
                        > >
                        > > I just got home from church and did a fairly thorough search on the Internet and found the 12 bows at:
                        > > http://www.molitvoslov.com/text1001.htm
                        > > In addition, they are incorporated *erroneously* into the Morning Prayers found in the Old Rite Prayer Book published by the parish in Erie. I was directly involved in the production of the first edition of this book and I was opposed to this hybridization, but the clergy decided to do this because they felt there was a distinct lack of morning prayers for lay people in the Old Rite. (Well, this may be true, but that is because the Midnight Office is the proper form of morning prayers, both in the Old Rite and in the Byzantine (Greek) Rite. The New Rite derives its Morning and Evening Prayers from Uniate-influenced Ukrainian sources -- a historical fact, not a judgment.)
                        > >
                        > > Nikita
                        > >
                        > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Now that is fascinating. Can we find the twelve-bow beginning on line?
                        > > >
                        > > > Stephen
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > The Seven Bow Beginning as it is known in the New Rite is a remnant of the official Order of the Cell Rule, a monastic prayer service which is rarely encountered in modern prayer books for laity. In the Russian Old Rite we still have these prayers, but there are actually twelve in the Old Rite, and the order is a little different. The New Rite is actually a reduction of the 12 to 7, and they are a completely different set of prayers from the Old Rite "Entrance and Departure Bows" (which Old Believers typically call "The Seven Bow Beginning", just to make terminology confusing). I can see where one could confuse the two, but they are different entities.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > You might ask WHY this 7-Bow Beginning is typically hard to locate in the New Rite. It's because of the collision of two separate liturgical cultures in the 1700s to 1800s in central Russia. After Patriarch Nikon's reforms in the previous century, the monasteries began to be systematically reduced in Russia, until they were almost completely wiped out by orders of the two female monarchs (Catherine and Elizabeth). With the loss of monasticism in the official Church, the need for prayer books to meet their needs dried up. At the same time, new prayer books for laity began to be imported from the Kiev Caves, which embraced a dramatically different set of domestic liturgical practices; for the most part, these Kievan prayer books have displaced the more authentic Muscovite liturgical practices for domestic use of monastics and laity alike. When St. Paisius Velichkovsky helped revive monasticism in Russia, the switch from Muscovite to Kievan culture and ideology had already occurred, and there was not enough interest to restore the older Muscovite practices. This is the legacy that the Russian New Rite has inherited to this day.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > There were, however, a few monasteries that attempted to keep the older traditions alive for quite a while longer, and they printed their own Cell Rule books for "in house" use. These all included various sequences of "Beginning Bows". Most notable are the Cell Rules of the monasteries of Sarov, Yuriev, Florishev, Optina and Trinity Lavra, some of which are hybrid rules. (See, for example, the Cell Rule of 500 of the Optina Monastery, which has only a 4-Bow Beginning: http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/cellrule.aspx)
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Other differences between the Muscovite and Kievan prayer books are:
                        > > > > The replacement of Compline and the Midnight Office with special Morning and Evening Prayers for laity; the loss of the monastic Cell Rule; the introduction of newly-composed Akathists; and a completely western ideology of performing complete services of Vespers and Matins in the cells or at home when one is unable to attend church (previously, one read the Psalter or did prostrations or Jesus Prayers instead of "singing in the cell", a practice which was discouraged until Kievan ideology appeared on the scene).
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Nikita
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Thank you, Fr Deacon Sergius! I have the Slavonic Jordanville Prayerbook in the 1968 edn (второе дополненное); it's not there. But why then is it so hard to find in any other source? It makes one wonder whether in the 1995 book it wasn't translated from English!
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Stephen
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "S. Miller" wrote:
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Stephen,
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > It does appear in Slavonic in the Slavonic edition of the Jordanville Prayerbook, p.378, 1995 Moscow edition.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Dcn. Sergius
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" wrote:
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > In various English-language sources, such as the first edition of the Jordanville Prayer Book, one finds the “Seven-Bow Beginning”:
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                        > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                        > > > > > > > 3. Thou hast created me; O Lord, have mercy on me.
                        > > > > > > > 4. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                        > > > > > > > 5. My Lady, most holy Theotokos, save me, a sinner.
                        > > > > > > > 6. Angel, my holy guardian, protect me from all evil.
                        > > > > > > > 7. Holy N. (one’s patron saint), pray to God for me.
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > This is said at the beginning and end of one’s rule of private prayer, with bows from the waist or prostrations, according to the day.
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > Yesterday I looked for the Slavonic text of this rule by googling “semipoklonnoe nachalo” (in Cyrillic letters, of course). I was surprised to find it mentioned only in Old-Rite sources, and in the following form:
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                        > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                        > > > > > > > 3. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                        > > > > > > > 4. It is truly meet to bless thee, O Theotokos, ever blessed and most immaculate and the Mother of our God. More honorable than the cherubim and truly more glorious than the seraphim, who without corruption gavest birth to God the Word, thee do we magnify.
                        > > > > > > > 5. Glory to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
                        > > > > > > > 6. Both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
                        > > > > > > > 7. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > A bow accompanies each item except the fourth, which is always done with a full prostration.
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > So according to the Old Rite the Seven Bows consist of the three Entrance Bows, Axion estin in the Old-Rite text, the small doxology divided, and a three-fold Kyrie eleison, without the petitions to the Theotokos, the Guardian Angel, and the Patron Saint.
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > So far I have been unable to find the Slavonic original of the “Seven-Bow Beginning” presented in English-language prayer books.
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > > Can anyone shed light on this?
                        > > > > > > >
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • starina77
                        Dear David, While the two rules need not be mutually exclusive, that is the way they are composed. They were not originally intended to be fused together
                        Message 11 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Dear David,

                          While the two rules need not be mutually exclusive, that is the way they are composed. They were not originally intended to be fused together because they represent two very different prayer rules from early eras of Christian practice -- the reciting of the Psalter being the original tradition, and the reading of canons and saying Jesus Prayers (and/or bows and prostrations) came later as our hymnography and spiritual disciplines developed.

                          If anyone wants to blend the two (as happened in the 18th and 19th centuries in the monasteries I mentioned in a previous posting on this thread), there is no one correct method for doing it, since (as it says in the pre-Nikonian Psalter) the prayer rule that we take upon ourselves may be of our own fashioning, although it is best to get the approval of our spiritual father to safeguard against taking on too heavy of a burden and to make sure that the prayer rule is appropriate. (During the era of St. Ignatii Brianchaninov, he added the cyclical reading of the Bible to the rule of the monks under his direction, but this is a late practice, since the Scriptures were not readily accessible to most people during the first 18 or 19 centuries of the Christian era.)

                          Nikita

                          --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "David" <Jamesdm49@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Dear Nikita:
                          >
                          > Thank you for this information, and for the link to the molitvoslov site, especially to the Old Rite order for the Cell Rule. I'm a little confused about how the cell rule fits together with the order for reading the psalter in the cell. Does one finish the cell rule with the dismissal as given on the molitvoslov site and start the other, as printed in the psalter, or can they be integrated in some fashion?
                          >
                          > David
                          >
                          > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Thank you for troubling yourself with this, Nikita. I was familiar with these twelve prayers from the Erie book, but had no idea that they were really a twelve-bow beginning for the cell rule.
                          > >
                          > > Interesting also that Optina's third petition (of four) runs together what elsewhere appears as two distinct petitions. Apparently once the Old Rite had been disturbed, there was a lot of leeway in prayer rules, which were not in the official New-Rite books, so each community revised the tradition in its own way.
                          > >
                          > > I have also been looking for the (usually) ten prayers in the morning and evening prayers of Russian New Rite prayer books, looking to see if I could find them in Greek, and while one or two have appeared I have not yet found any collection of all of them together. Here too there is some variety; those in the St Tikhon's prayer book are not exactly the same as those in the Jordanville prayer book. Of course they don't appear in the Erie prayer book at all.
                          > >
                          > > Again, thanks for clarifying this rather obscure subject.
                          > >
                          > > Stephen
                          > >
                          > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > I just got home from church and did a fairly thorough search on the Internet and found the 12 bows at:
                          > > > http://www.molitvoslov.com/text1001.htm
                          > > > In addition, they are incorporated *erroneously* into the Morning Prayers found in the Old Rite Prayer Book published by the parish in Erie. I was directly involved in the production of the first edition of this book and I was opposed to this hybridization, but the clergy decided to do this because they felt there was a distinct lack of morning prayers for lay people in the Old Rite. (Well, this may be true, but that is because the Midnight Office is the proper form of morning prayers, both in the Old Rite and in the Byzantine (Greek) Rite. The New Rite derives its Morning and Evening Prayers from Uniate-influenced Ukrainian sources -- a historical fact, not a judgment.)
                          > > >
                          > > > Nikita
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Now that is fascinating. Can we find the twelve-bow beginning on line?
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Stephen
                          > > > >
                          > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" <starina77@> wrote:
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > The Seven Bow Beginning as it is known in the New Rite is a remnant of the official Order of the Cell Rule, a monastic prayer service which is rarely encountered in modern prayer books for laity. In the Russian Old Rite we still have these prayers, but there are actually twelve in the Old Rite, and the order is a little different. The New Rite is actually a reduction of the 12 to 7, and they are a completely different set of prayers from the Old Rite "Entrance and Departure Bows" (which Old Believers typically call "The Seven Bow Beginning", just to make terminology confusing). I can see where one could confuse the two, but they are different entities.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > You might ask WHY this 7-Bow Beginning is typically hard to locate in the New Rite. It's because of the collision of two separate liturgical cultures in the 1700s to 1800s in central Russia. After Patriarch Nikon's reforms in the previous century, the monasteries began to be systematically reduced in Russia, until they were almost completely wiped out by orders of the two female monarchs (Catherine and Elizabeth). With the loss of monasticism in the official Church, the need for prayer books to meet their needs dried up. At the same time, new prayer books for laity began to be imported from the Kiev Caves, which embraced a dramatically different set of domestic liturgical practices; for the most part, these Kievan prayer books have displaced the more authentic Muscovite liturgical practices for domestic use of monastics and laity alike. When St. Paisius Velichkovsky helped revive monasticism in Russia, the switch from Muscovite to Kievan culture and ideology had already occurred, and there was not enough interest to restore the older Muscovite practices. This is the legacy that the Russian New Rite has inherited to this day.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > There were, however, a few monasteries that attempted to keep the older traditions alive for quite a while longer, and they printed their own Cell Rule books for "in house" use. These all included various sequences of "Beginning Bows". Most notable are the Cell Rules of the monasteries of Sarov, Yuriev, Florishev, Optina and Trinity Lavra, some of which are hybrid rules. (See, for example, the Cell Rule of 500 of the Optina Monastery, which has only a 4-Bow Beginning: http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/cellrule.aspx)
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Other differences between the Muscovite and Kievan prayer books are:
                          > > > > > The replacement of Compline and the Midnight Office with special Morning and Evening Prayers for laity; the loss of the monastic Cell Rule; the introduction of newly-composed Akathists; and a completely western ideology of performing complete services of Vespers and Matins in the cells or at home when one is unable to attend church (previously, one read the Psalter or did prostrations or Jesus Prayers instead of "singing in the cell", a practice which was discouraged until Kievan ideology appeared on the scene).
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Nikita
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > Thank you, Fr Deacon Sergius! I have the Slavonic Jordanville Prayerbook in the 1968 edn (второе дополненное); it's not there. But why then is it so hard to find in any other source? It makes one wonder whether in the 1995 book it wasn't translated from English!
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > Stephen
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "S. Miller" <srbmillerr@> wrote:
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > Stephen,
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > It does appear in Slavonic in the Slavonic edition of the Jordanville Prayerbook, p.378, 1995 Moscow edition.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > Dcn. Sergius
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" <stephen_r1937@> wrote:
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > In various English-language sources, such as the first edition of the Jordanville Prayer Book, one finds the “Seven-Bow Beginning”:
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                          > > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                          > > > > > > > > 3. Thou hast created me; O Lord, have mercy on me.
                          > > > > > > > > 4. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                          > > > > > > > > 5. My Lady, most holy Theotokos, save me, a sinner.
                          > > > > > > > > 6. Angel, my holy guardian, protect me from all evil.
                          > > > > > > > > 7. Holy N. (one’s patron saint), pray to God for me.
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > This is said at the beginning and end of one’s rule of private prayer, with bows from the waist or prostrations, according to the day.
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > Yesterday I looked for the Slavonic text of this rule by googling “semipoklonnoe nachalo” (in Cyrillic letters, of course). I was surprised to find it mentioned only in Old-Rite sources, and in the following form:
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                          > > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                          > > > > > > > > 3. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                          > > > > > > > > 4. It is truly meet to bless thee, O Theotokos, ever blessed and most immaculate and the Mother of our God. More honorable than the cherubim and truly more glorious than the seraphim, who without corruption gavest birth to God the Word, thee do we magnify.
                          > > > > > > > > 5. Glory to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
                          > > > > > > > > 6. Both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
                          > > > > > > > > 7. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > A bow accompanies each item except the fourth, which is always done with a full prostration.
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > So according to the Old Rite the Seven Bows consist of the three Entrance Bows, Axion estin in the Old-Rite text, the small doxology divided, and a three-fold Kyrie eleison, without the petitions to the Theotokos, the Guardian Angel, and the Patron Saint.
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > So far I have been unable to find the Slavonic original of the “Seven-Bow Beginning” presented in English-language prayer books.
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > > Can anyone shed light on this?
                          > > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • starina77
                          Dear Fr. John, Part of the reason that all this is new to you (and others) is because when the schism happened in the Russian Church in the mid-1600s, the two
                          Message 12 of 21 , Apr 11, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Dear Fr. John,

                            Part of the reason that all this is new to you (and others) is because when the schism happened in the Russian Church in the mid-1600s, the two factions each went their own way and washed their hands of each other, subsequently pursuing their own agendas and building their own self-contained cultures. The Old Ritualists kept what was given to them and looked to early Russian-Byzantine history for their examples, while the mainstream Russian Church battled a couple centuries of aggressive secularization, at last having to revive its spiritual practices from non-native sources.

                            With the lack of repressive tsarist-era and communist-era legislations, Old Believer academics are taking full advantage of opportunities to bring Russia's authentic heritage into a more mainstream viewing. We got written out of the official history books for almost three centuries, but thanks to new religious freedoms and the Internet, that has changed dramatically. The great thing about all this is that there has been a wonderful thawing of attitudes between the two churches, and many ancient books, manuscripts and icons have at last been brought to light. For example, there are New Rite parishes in Russia that exclusively use Znamenny Chant and other early traditions. It's a fascinating time for historians, liturgists and musicologists!

                            So to answer your question about WHO is supposed to follow the cell rule", the answer is: Christians. In the Old Rite, we do not distinguish between a monastic or lay version of prayer, as we teach that all of us, monks and laity alike, are called to live the Christian life, which is a life of prayer. We don't treat our monastics like gurus or specially-sanctified men/women (like some contemporary jurisdictions do), but as Christians who want to take upon themselves a heavier burden, while being bound to the same Christian life that all of us laity are equally bound to. So, while laity are not bound to observe the same prayer rule as monastics, we too are bound through baptism to observe a rule of daily prayer, which the Holy Fathers have provided for us. Laity tend to shorten it because of our busy lifestyles, while monastics tend to keep it in full.

                            Nikita

                            --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, frjsilver@... wrote:
                            >
                            > The question remains: Who is expected to follow the 'cell rule'? Laity or monastics?
                            >
                            > Russian 'old rite' vs 'new rite' differences?
                            >
                            > I've been a 'new rite' (I think) monk for more than thirty years, and this is all news to me!
                            >
                            > Monk James
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Apr 11, 2011 07:49:24 PM, ustav@yahoogroups.com wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Dear Nikita:
                            >
                            > Thank you for this information, and for the link to the molitvoslov site, especially to the Old Rite order for the Cell Rule. I'm a little confused about how the cell rule fits together with the order for reading the psalter in the cell. Does one finish the cell rule with the dismissal as given on the molitvoslov site and start the other, as printed in the psalter, or can they be integrated in some fashion?
                            >
                            > David
                            >
                            > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Thank you for troubling yourself with this, Nikita. I was familiar with these twelve prayers from the Erie book, but had no idea that they were really a twelve-bow beginning for the cell rule.
                            > >
                            > > Interesting also that Optina's third petition (of four) runs together what elsewhere appears as two distinct petitions. Apparently once the Old Rite had been disturbed, there was a lot of leeway in prayer rules, which were not in the official New-Rite books, so each community revised the tradition in its own way.
                            > >
                            > > I have also been looking for the (usually) ten prayers in the morning and evening prayers of Russian New Rite prayer books, looking to see if I could find them in Greek, and while one or two have appeared I have not yet found any collection of all of them together. Here too there is some variety; those in the St Tikhon's prayer book are not exactly the same as those in the Jordanville prayer book. Of course they don't appear in the Erie prayer book at all.
                            > >
                            > > Again, thanks for clarifying this rather obscure subject.
                            > >
                            > > Stephen
                            > >
                            > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > I just got home from church and did a fairly thorough search on the Internet and found the 12 bows at:
                            > > > http://www.molitvoslov.com/text1001.htm
                            > > > In addition, they are incorporated *erroneously* into the Morning Prayers found in the Old Rite Prayer Book published by the parish in Erie. I was directly involved in the production of the first edition of this book and I was opposed to this hybridization, but the clergy decided to do this because they felt there was a distinct lack of morning prayers for lay people in the Old Rite. (Well, this may be true, but that is because the Midnight Office is the proper form of morning prayers, both in the Old Rite and in the Byzantine (Greek) Rite. The New Rite derives its Morning and Evening Prayers from Uniate-influenced Ukrainian sources -- a historical fact, not a judgment.)
                            > > >
                            > > > Nikita
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Now that is fascinating. Can we find the twelve-bow beginning on line?
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Stephen
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "starina77" wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > The Seven Bow Beginning as it is known in the New Rite is a remnant of the official Order of the Cell Rule, a monastic prayer service which is rarely encountered in modern prayer books for laity. In the Russian Old Rite we still have these prayers, but there are actually twelve in the Old Rite, and the order is a little different. The New Rite is actually a reduction of the 12 to 7, and they are a completely different set of prayers from the Old Rite "Entrance and Departure Bows" (which Old Believers typically call "The Seven Bow Beginning", just to make terminology confusing). I can see where one could confuse the two, but they are different entities.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > You might ask WHY this 7-Bow Beginning is typically hard to locate in the New Rite. It's because of the collision of two separate liturgical cultures in the 1700s to 1800s in central Russia. After Patriarch Nikon's reforms in the previous century, the monasteries began to be systematically reduced in Russia, until they were almost completely wiped out by orders of the two female monarchs (Catherine and Elizabeth). With the loss of monasticism in the official Church, the need for prayer books to meet their needs dried up. At the same time, new prayer books for laity began to be imported from the Kiev Caves, which embraced a dramatically different set of domestic liturgical practices; for the most part, these Kievan prayer books have displaced the more authentic Muscovite liturgical practices for domestic use of monastics and laity alike. When St. Paisius Velichkovsky helped revive monasticism in Russia, the switch from Muscovite to Kievan culture and ideology had already occurred, and there was not enough interest to restore the older Muscovite practices. This is the legacy that the Russian New Rite has inherited to this day.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > There were, however, a few monasteries that attempted to keep the older traditions alive for quite a while longer, and they printed their own Cell Rule books for "in house" use. These all included various sequences of "Beginning Bows". Most notable are the Cell Rules of the monasteries of Sarov, Yuriev, Florishev, Optina and Trinity Lavra, some of which are hybrid rules. (See, for example, the Cell Rule of 500 of the Optina Monastery, which has only a 4-Bow Beginning: http://orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/cellrule.aspx)
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > Other differences between the Muscovite and Kievan prayer books are:
                            > > > > > The replacement of Compline and the Midnight Office with special Morning and Evening Prayers for laity; the loss of the monastic Cell Rule; the introduction of newly-composed Akathists; and a completely western ideology of performing complete services of Vespers and Matins in the cells or at home when one is unable to attend church (previously, one read the Psalter or did prostrations or Jesus Prayers instead of "singing in the cell", a practice which was discouraged until Kievan ideology appeared on the scene).
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > Nikita
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" wrote:
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Thank you, Fr Deacon Sergius! I have the Slavonic Jordanville Prayerbook in the 1968 edn (в�о�ое дополненное); it's not there. But why then is it so hard to find in any other source? It makes one wonder whether in the 1995 book it wasn't translated from English!
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Stephen
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "S. Miller" wrote:
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > Stephen,
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > It does appear in Slavonic in the Slavonic edition of the Jordanville Prayerbook, p.378, 1995 Moscow edition.
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > Dcn. Sergius
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "stephen_r1937" wrote:
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > In various English-language sources, such as the first edition of the Jordanville Prayer Book, one finds the �Seven-Bow Beginning�:
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                            > > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                            > > > > > > > > 3. Thou hast created me; O Lord, have mercy on me.
                            > > > > > > > > 4. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                            > > > > > > > > 5. My Lady, most holy Theotokos, save me, a sinner.
                            > > > > > > > > 6. Angel, my holy guardian, protect me from all evil.
                            > > > > > > > > 7. Holy N. (one�s patron saint), pray to God for me.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > This is said at the beginning and end of one�s rule of private prayer, with bows from the waist or prostrations, according to the day.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > Yesterday I looked for the Slavonic text of this rule by googling �semipoklonnoe nachalo� (in Cyrillic letters, of course). I was surprised to find it mentioned only in Old-Rite sources, and in the following form:
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > 1. O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.
                            > > > > > > > > 2. O God, cleanse me, a sinner, and have mercy on me.
                            > > > > > > > > 3. I have sinned without measure; O Lord, forgive me.
                            > > > > > > > > 4. It is truly meet to bless thee, O Theotokos, ever blessed and most immaculate and the Mother of our God. More honorable than the cherubim and truly more glorious than the seraphim, who without corruption gavest birth to God the Word, thee do we magnify.
                            > > > > > > > > 5. Glory to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
                            > > > > > > > > 6. Both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
                            > > > > > > > > 7. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > A bow accompanies each item except the fourth, which is always done with a full prostration.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > So according to the Old Rite the Seven Bows consist of the three Entrance Bows, Axion estin in the Old-Rite text, the small doxology divided, and a three-fold Kyrie eleison, without the petitions to the Theotokos, the Guardian Angel, and the Patron Saint.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > So far I have been unable to find the Slavonic original of the �Seven-Bow Beginning� presented in English-language prayer books.
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > Can anyone shed light on this?
                            > > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • otetzmark@hotmail.com
                            I was wondering if anyone had an English translation of the stikhi chanted before the canon to Sweet Jesus in the cell rule... ? Spasi Khristos - Hieromonk
                            Message 13 of 21 , Jun 7, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I was wondering if anyone had an English translation of the stikhi chanted before the canon to Sweet Jesus in the cell rule... ?

                              Spasi Khristos - Hieromonk Mark

                              > > The question remains: Who is expected to follow the 'cell rule'? Laity or monastics?
                              > >
                              > > Russian 'old rite' vs 'new rite' differences?
                              > >
                              > > I've been a 'new rite' (I think) monk for more than thirty years, and this is all news to me!
                              > >
                              > > Monk James
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.