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Re: [ustav] Re: History of the Cassock

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  • Molly Grabowski
    So says the SCOT! - Theodora
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 15, 2010
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      So says the SCOT!

      - Theodora

      On 9/15/2010 6:05 AM, smackdaddy.au@... wrote:
      > Trousers are for barbarians.
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      > Regards
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      > Dcn Stephen McKay
      >
      > Sent from my BlackBerry® from Optus
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      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      >
      > From: "subdeaconmichaelastley"<subdeaconmichael@...>
      >
      > Sender: ustav@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2010 11:54:36
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      > To:<ustav@yahoogroups.com>
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      > Reply-To: ustav@yahoogroups.com
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      > Subject: [ustav] Re: History of the Cassock
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      >
      > And trousers! I should hope.
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      > :-D
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      >
      > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "rkoch19582002"<rkoch19582002@...> wrote:
      >
      >> I've found that the Reader's clothing of shoes (with socks), pants& shirt are entirely useful in and out of church. Luckily no one has ever prescribed headgear. -- Bob Koch
      >> --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "Rdr James"<rdrjames@> wrote:
      >>> This article from the 'New Liturgical Movement' blog piqued my interest:
      >>> http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2010/09/clerical-dress-in-city-of-rome-in-19th.html
      >>> 'Wearing an identifiable form of clerical dress has always been prescribed by the Church and, today, the wearing of the cassock at all times has become a symbol of strong priestly identity and attachment to tradition -- particularly in the light of the abandonment of clerical dress altogether by many since the time of the Council.
      >>> It is interesting to note, however, that the use the cassock, originally a late Roman, medieval magistrate's garment, has seen an evolution in the past 150 years up to the present day; an evolution which many might find surprising. From the point of view of history, many of us may not be aware that a little more than a century ago the cassock was used only within liturgical, ceremonial or courtly contexts, and was not worn in day to day clerical life. Day to day usage dates only from the turn of the 19th century following from the French usage since the time of the 1789 revolution. Ironically then, the day to day usage which is today considered such a strong symbol of tradition was at one time considered quite differently....."
      >>> Got me wondering about the history of the rason and riassa (Slavic terms) for the inner and outer garments of clergy in the Orthodox Church.
      >>> Does anyone know the history of these garments? And why in the Slavic tradition, readers wear the inner cassock, but in the Greek tradition, chanters wear the outer one?
      >>> And how far back those traditions go, and are they 'universal' within their traditional areas of use?
      >>> Just something to ponder.
      >>> Rdr. James Morgan
      >>> Olympia, WA
      >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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