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Re: Service for Pochaev Icon July 23

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  • Kenneth Doll
    Sorry I missed the Little in the Vespers on page 1. I didn t realize that this was a vigil ranked feast. KD ... document (the beginning of Great Vespers) it
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 1, 2007
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      Sorry I missed the "Little" in the Vespers on page 1. I didn't
      realize that this was a vigil ranked feast.
      KD

      --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, Carol Surgant <casurgant@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks Kenneth for the link. If you scroll down to page 3 of this
      document (the beginning of Great Vespers) it does indicate Tone 5,
      but no Podoben indicated. Its highly likely that the service was
      either composed without podobny or at least indications of such were
      left out due to disuse of Podoby at the time. The service appears to
      have been composed sometime following the repose of Tsar Nicholas I
      (1855), since in the 7th Ode there is a troparion for the repose of
      the soul of Nicholas I, followed by the next troparion "To those who
      govern now be thou merciful..."
      > I am hoping to do some music in english for this feast-- don't
      know how much will be finished by Saturday. I would love to be able
      to use a podoben for the stichera, but don't want to invent anything
      that is not prescribed.
      > cas
      >
      > Kenneth Doll <dollpka@...> wrote:
      > http://www.orthlib.info/Menaia/Rjadovaja-Minea/11-
      July/jul23p.pdf
      > Looks like this says 4 (stichera), tone 4. Different than SJKP but
      > no podoben. (I think ...)
      > Are you planning on troparion and kontakion as well?
      > KD
      >
      > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "Carol Surgant" <casurgant@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Dear Fathers and brethren in Christ,
      > >
      > > In the service to the Pochaev Icon (July 23), at the "Lord I have
      > > cried", the 1st set of stichera are labelled Tone 5. They are not
      > > marked (in the SJKP menaion) with a special melody name or as
      > > idiomela; however, I'm guessing that the stichera might to be of
      > the
      > > melody "Rejoice". 3 indicators point to this podoben: length and
      > > number of phrases of the stichera, each has the ending "grant our
      > > souls great mercy" or similar wording, and one of the stichera
      > does
      > > start with the word "Rejoice". Is there any version of this
      > service in
      > > slavonic that might shed light on this?
      > >
      > > Carol Surgant
      > > http://music.russianorthodox-stl.org
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Edward Lambertsen
      ... Dear Carol and list, It is not surprising that there is reference in the service to Emperor Nicholas I. He was personally responsible for the Monastery of
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 1, 2007
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        On Aug 1, 2007, at 12:34 AM, Carol Surgant wrote:
        > The service appears to have been composed sometime following the
        > repose of Tsar Nicholas I (1855), since in the 7th Ode there is a
        > troparion for the repose of the soul of Nicholas I, followed by the
        > next troparion "To those who govern now be thou merciful..."






        Dear Carol and list,

        It is not surprising that there is reference in the service to
        Emperor Nicholas I. He was personally responsible for the Monastery
        of Pochaev being returned to the Orthodox (in the mid-1830s) after it
        had been taken over and held by the Uniats for a century and a half
        or so. I'm not sure, but I think it may also have been Emperor
        Nicholas I who had Pochaev elevated to the rank of Lavra, on a par
        with the great Monasteries of the Kiev Caves, Trinity-St. Sergius and
        St. Alexander Nevsky..

        The Service to the Pochaev Icon was composed by a married priest,
        whose name escapes me now. If anyone has the back issues of "Living
        Orthodoxy" in which the life of St. Job of Pochaev was serialized,
        look at the end of the final installment. The author of the book
        from which the Life was translated is also the author of the Services
        to the Pochaev Icon and St. Job.

        Sincerely,

        Isaac Lambertsen


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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