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Re: Polyeleos/Amomos

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  • gugushvili
    ... According to the Ms Sinai 1097 the Amomos had the following refrains (I give an example in Slavonic): 1st stasis: Ublazhaem tya, [Bogovidche Moisee,
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 1, 2004
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      --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, psomalis@h... wrote:
      > Cezar,
      > I do not think the Magnification (Marimurile) is an element of sabbaitic
      > typikon. I'd say it is a later addition, although I have not found any
      > reference as to when it all started.

      According to the Ms Sinai 1097 the Amomos had the following refrains
      (I give an example in Slavonic):

      1st stasis: Ublazhaem tya, [Bogovidche Moisee, vechnoblazhennago i
      bogoslavnago proroka Hrista Spasitelya.]

      2nd stasis: Dostoino est yako voistinu blazhiti tya, [zakonodavca, so
      angeli soglasno poyuschago pesn nebesnuyu.]

      3rd stasis: Rodi vsi tya ublazhaem, [Bogovidche Moisee.]

      The last parts in square brackets were modified accordingly for other
      commemorations. Since the Amomos had refrains, probably it's not
      surprising that the Selected Psalm also had them. The magnifications
      could be a trace of an old practice, though it's not necessary that
      their texts were the same. On the other hand in modern Greek practice
      polyeleos is chanted without refrains except of adding Allelouia and
      the selected psalm is chanted as any other polyeleos psalm.

      Shota

      P.S. Actually there's a doctoral thesis of A. Chaldaiakes dealing with
      the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine polyeleoi and published recently by
      the Institute of the Byzantine Musicology of the Church of Greece (a
      good 900 pages). Is anybody aware of its contents?
    • gugushvili
      Dear Sergius, ... The modern Russian Typikon says: i poem neporochni, na glas 5: v nihzhe kadit ierei. Tazhe tropari, Angelskiy sobor... According to the
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 1, 2004
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        Dear Sergius,

        --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "Sergius Miller" <srbmillerr@a...> wrote:
        > As I recall, historically the use of incense on Sunday during the
        > post Ps. 118 troparia, "The Assembly of the Angels" is in imitation
        > of the perfume-bearing women coming early to the tomb. It imitated
        > their sweet smelling spices and it prepared for the Gospel reading.
        > The censing did not occur until the troparia.

        The modern Russian Typikon says: i poem neporochni, na glas 5: v
        nihzhe kadit ierei. Tazhe tropari, Angelskiy sobor...

        According to the Georgian Shio-Mgvime Monastery Typikon (12th c.,
        reflecting the practices of the Black Mountain): God the Lord, the
        second kathisma, Sedalen, Glory... Both now... Theotokion, reading and
        kathisma: I will love Thee... Sedalen, reading, polyeleos with triple
        Allelouia. Sedalen, reading and the Amomos during which the priest
        censes. Ipakoi and reading. After each kathisma the deacon says the
        small litany and the priest the ekphonesis.

        Shota
      • psomalis@hol.gr
        Shota, this is very interesting indeed! I have always believed that the magnifications are related to the Good Friday enkomia (statiji, prohod). So the first
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 1, 2004
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          Shota,
          this is very interesting indeed!
          I have always believed that the magnifications are related to the Good Friday
          enkomia (statiji, prohod).
          So the first magnification you mention is sort of podoben (prosomoion) of the
          1st stasis hymn "The life in the grave" etc.
          Of course due to translation the text does not agree with the original and the
          magnification melody belongs to what Stephen called 'tone 9' :-)
          Romanians sing them to some peculiar version of mode I and this melody, in my
          opinion, is very similar with the Serbian one; I think they both have evolved
          from monophonic Russian melodies.
          Bulgarians sing the magnification in Byzantine chant and its mode varies
          according to the feast (e.g. Nativity of Theotokos mode VI, hierachs mode IV
          etc.)
          In some monasteries and shrines in Greece there exist enkomia for feasts of
          saints and the 1st stasis begins "We bless thee...".
          Although such services imitating the Good Friday enkomia are prohibited by the
          1881 typikon, the enkomia for the Dormition of the Theotokos are very popular
          and many churches hold a similar service, especially if they have the body of a
          saint (e.g. in Corfu for St. Spyridon).
          The Romanian Orthodox Church, as Cezar can verify, has maintained three types of
          magnification for some feasts in the pattern set forth below.
          Very interesting indeed.
          Panagiotis
          Αρχικό μήνυμα από gugushvili <gugushvili@...>:

          >
          >
          > --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, psomalis@h... wrote:
          > > Cezar,
          > > I do not think the Magnification (Marimurile) is an element of sabbaitic
          > > typikon. I'd say it is a later addition, although I have not found any
          > > reference as to when it all started.
          >
          > According to the Ms Sinai 1097 the Amomos had the following refrains
          > (I give an example in Slavonic):
          >
          > 1st stasis: Ublazhaem tya, [Bogovidche Moisee, vechnoblazhennago i
          > bogoslavnago proroka Hrista Spasitelya.]
          >
          > 2nd stasis: Dostoino est yako voistinu blazhiti tya, [zakonodavca, so
          > angeli soglasno poyuschago pesn nebesnuyu.]
          >
          > 3rd stasis: Rodi vsi tya ublazhaem, [Bogovidche Moisee.]
          >
          > The last parts in square brackets were modified accordingly for other
          > commemorations. Since the Amomos had refrains, probably it's not
          > surprising that the Selected Psalm also had them. The magnifications
          > could be a trace of an old practice, though it's not necessary that
          > their texts were the same. On the other hand in modern Greek practice
          > polyeleos is chanted without refrains except of adding Allelouia and
          > the selected psalm is chanted as any other polyeleos psalm.
          >
          > Shota
          >
          > P.S. Actually there's a doctoral thesis of A. Chaldaiakes dealing with
          > the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine polyeleoi and published recently by
          > the Institute of the Byzantine Musicology of the Church of Greece (a
          > good 900 pages). Is anybody aware of its contents?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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        • Cezar Login
          I do not think the Magnification (Marimurile) is an element of sabbaitic typikon. I d say it is a later addition, although I have not found any reference as to
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 1, 2004
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            I do not think the Magnification (Marimurile) is an element of sabbaitic
            typikon. I'd say it is a later addition, although I have not found any
            reference as to when it all started.

            CL: In the 1816 edition of the Romanian Sabbaite Typikon Magnifications are
            indicated to be used, including the solemn setting of the icon in the middle
            of the church, when there is a Vigil.

            We have feasts with even 4 separate Magnifications.

            Cezar
          • Sergius Miller
            ... and ... triple ... Dear Shota, Is this for all Sundays, or for those in the winter months for the lenthening of the night? It is also interesting in that
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 1, 2004
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              --- In ustav@yahoogroups.com, "gugushvili" <gugushvili@y...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > According to the Georgian Shio-Mgvime Monastery Typikon (12th c.,
              > reflecting the practices of the Black Mountain): God the Lord, the
              > second kathisma, Sedalen, Glory... Both now... Theotokion, reading
              and
              > kathisma: I will love Thee... Sedalen, reading, polyeleos with
              triple
              > Allelouia. Sedalen, reading and the Amomos during which the priest
              > censes. Ipakoi and reading. After each kathisma the deacon says the
              > small litany and the priest the ekphonesis.
              >
              > Shota

              Dear Shota,

              Is this for all Sundays, or for those in the winter months for the
              lenthening of the night?

              It is also interesting in that it is the reverse of what Fr. Pimen
              Simon once described on this list as the Old Believer usage when a
              Polyeleos feast, other than the Gr. Feasts of the Savior, occurs on a
              Sunday. There the Amomos & tropari as well as the Hypakoe preceded
              the Polyeleos w/Magnification 7 Sedalen. As I recall the censing was
              then postponed until the Magnification.

              Sergius
            • Shota Gugushvili
              Dear Sergius, ... Hard to say, it s from the part describing Sunday vigil. If there s no provision in other parts of the Typikon, then probably the polyeleos
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 1, 2004
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                Dear Sergius,

                --- Sergius Miller <srbmillerr@...> wrote:
                > Is this for all Sundays, or for those in the winter
                > months for the
                > lengthening of the night?

                Hard to say, it's from the part describing Sunday
                vigil. If there's no provision in other parts of the
                Typikon, then probably the polyeleos was chanted
                during the whole year. As Uspenskiy says, Shio-mgvime
                Typikon is the oldest known monastic Typikon
                mentioning Polyeleos (Shio-mgvime Typikon was
                translated from Greek into Georgian by St. Arseny of
                Ikalto in the 1st quarter of the 12th c. St. Arseny
                was a monk of Kalipos monastery on Black Mountain and
                the Typikon was meant for Shio-mgvime monastery
                renewed by St. King David).

                The description of it is given in a book by K.
                Kekelidze (in Russian) published in 1908. I think it
                contains one error: an old Georgian term denoting
                polyeleos was auarebditi (exomologeisthe, confess
                unto) used as such e.g. in the printed Hieratikon from
                1710. In the 18th c. there was a major revision of the
                Georgian liturgical terms and auarebditi was
                substituted with mravalmotskale (which actually is a
                translation of polyeleos) or even polyeleos. Probably
                Kekelidze understood the rubric given in the ms as
                calling for Ps. 135 only and he writes only about Ps.
                135. Of course unless I see the actual Georgian text
                from the ms I can't say whether it's true or not.

                Some old Typika explicitely forbid chanting of the
                polyeleos during certain periods of the year, e.g. the
                Typikon of St. Catherine's monastery (Mt. Sinai) from
                the beginning of the 13th c. forbids it from the
                Elevation of the Cross till Cheasefare Sunday.

                > It is also interesting in that it is the reverse of
                > what Fr. Pimen
                > Simon once described on this list as the Old
                > Believer usage when a
                > Polyeleos feast, other than the Gr. Feasts of the
                > Savior, occurs on a
                > Sunday. There the Amomos & tropari as well as the
                > Hypakoe preceded
                > the Polyeleos w/Magnification & Sedalen.

                Uspenskiy says in "Vsenoschnoe bdenie.." that
                Polyeleos originates in Studios monastery, it was
                accepted by the Great Church and from it it entered
                Jerusalem Patriarchal Typikon. He refers to
                Papadopoulo-Keramefs who says that in Jerusalem
                Patriarchal Typikon the polyeleos was occupying the
                place of the 3rd kathisma and was preceding the
                Amomos. That's exactly what Shio-mgvime Typikon says.
                The Patriarchal Typikon in its own turn influenced the
                Sabbaitic typikon and that's how the polyeleos
                appeared there.

                The additional psalms for specific feasts appeared
                later (and even later the Selected Psalm). Some
                Typikons of the 13/14th c. indicate their chanting
                before the Polyeleos and some after it. Afterwards the
                latter practice prevailed.

                Shota





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