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Pronunciation of some English words

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  • stephen_r1937
    Thus saith Michael Minow: Christ is Risen! Please post this also. Please think of the phrasing in the Holy Bible. The words cannot be thus sath the Lord . .
    Message 1 of 33 , May 31, 2002
      Thus saith Michael Minow:

      Christ is Risen!

      Please post this also. Please think of the phrasing in the Holy
      Bible. The words cannot be "thus sath the Lord . . " or "thus seth
      the Lord". I might be wrong but back in the 60's when the movies
      made about Biblical stories were done accurately. Charleton Heston
      as Moses spoke "thus sayeth the Lord Thy God . .". I know he is not
      an Orthodox Christian but he has enough respect of language and his
      representation as a man of God to do his acting and speaking
      properly. "In the Beginning was the Word and the Word was God".
      Please let us stop butchering the words.
      always your brother, Reader Michael from Holy Trinity Russian
      Orthodox parish in Windsor Canada

      Dear Michael

      OK, there it is. If you need to post anything to list and continue
      to experience conflict between Hotmail and Yahoo, just send it my way
      and I will post it. But I will be away until late Sunday, so I
      cannot promise same-day service.

      Stephen
    • stephen_r1937
      Daniel is quite right. Until the introduction of the vernacular after the Second Vatican Council, RCs were encouraged to pray the Mass with the help of
      Message 33 of 33 , Jun 9 6:02 AM
        Daniel is quite right. Until the introduction of the vernacular
        after the Second Vatican Council, RCs were encouraged to "pray the
        Mass" with the help of bilingual Missals. One can still find these
        in second=hand bookstores from time to time. The language of the
        English page facing the Latin was essentially that of the Douay-
        Rheims Bible (minus the odd Latinisms of the pre-Challoner edn),
        which is not significantly different from that of the King James
        Bible or the Book of Common Prayer up to the 1936 edn (in the USA--
        of course the date of the last edn to use the traditional liturgical
        English will vary from country to country). Byzantine-rite
        Catholics had similar bilingual books, and there were also some of
        these emanting from Orthodox sources, with Slavonic in Latin letters
        (Slovak orthography) on the verso and English on the recto, and
        again the English was King James style. (Byz. Catholics also had
        such books with Hungarian on one side and English on the other.)
        And I am sure that there are other such things that I have not seen
        but others on this list have. Few Roman Catholics knew much Latin,
        although of course they learned a number of familiar texts by heart;
        and American-born children of immigrants mostly lost their ancestral
        language as quickly as American culture encouraged them to do so (as
        soon as possible), so books of this sort were needed and were much
        used. Now where I live it's a great effort to work up a Slovonic
        service once a year.

        Stephen Reynolds


        --- In ustav@y..., Daniel Olson <daniel@k...> wrote:
        > on 6/3/02 12:49 PM, Monk James wrote:
        >
        > > Roman Catholics worshipped in Latin until the 1960s, so
        this 'traditional'
        > > language isn't part of their experience.
        >
        > This is not really true. The "traditional" language of the Douay-
        Rheims
        > version of the Bible was certainly very much a part of Roman
        Catholic
        > experience. This version (New Testament published at Rheims in
        1582 and the
        > Old Testament in Douay in 1609-10) was contemporary to the
        Authorized
        > Version (published in 1611). Of course, there are differences
        between the
        > two translations, as is to be expected; but the use
        of "traditional"
        > language is common to both versions. To be convinced of this one
        only has
        > to compare the Douay-Rheims and the Authorised Version with any
        modern
        > translation, for example "The New English Bible".
        >
        > In addition to the use of "traditional" language in the Douay-
        Rheims Bible,
        > Roman Catholic prayerbooks, lay missals, hymnals, para-liturgical
        devotional
        > materials, etc., used "traditional" language as well. One well-
        known
        > example of this is the "Hail Mary" of the Rosary, which is still
        quite
        > commonly used by Roman Catholics: "...blessed art thou among women
        and
        > blessed is the fruit of thy womb..."
        >
        > Daniel Olson
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