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Re: USS Chase [1 Attachment]

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  • Ray
    Two photos uploaded to the Photos section, under USS Chase Ray
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 26, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Two photos uploaded to the Photos section, under "USS Chase"
      Ray

      --- In usshipsoftheline@yahoogroups.com, James Friedman <thunder1970nn@...> wrote:
      >
      > The attachments did not come through. Try sending direct to thunder1970nn@...
      >  
      > Merry Christmas.
      >  
      > James
      >  
      >
      >
      > >________________________________
      > >From: Ray Peacock <ray@...>
      > >To: usshipsoftheline@yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Saturday, December 24, 2011 4:16 PM
      > >Subject: RE: [usshipsoftheline] USS Chase [1 Attachment]
      > >
      > > 
      > >[Attachment(s) from Ray Peacock included below]
      > >James
      > >Many thanks.
      > >That looks like it. The date and type of ship, Revenue Cutter,  fits well with Rial being a cadet, transferring to “Windom” later.  The detailed notes are compatible with the ship being a “School of Instruction training ship”.
      > >His handwriting would put me to shame â€" no word processors in those days.  See attached sample.
      > >Ray
      > > 
      > >From:usshipsoftheline@yahoogroups.com [mailto:usshipsoftheline@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of James Friedman
      > >Sent: December 24, 2011 2:24 PM
      > >To: usshipsoftheline@yahoogroups.com
      > >Subject: Re: [usshipsoftheline] USS Chase
      > > 
      > > 
      > >Here's the whole entry.
      > > 
      > >James
      > > 
      > >USRC Salmon P. Chase (1878)
      > >From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      > >Jump to: navigation, search
      > >
      > >Career (United States of America)
      > >Name: USRC Salmon P. Chase
      > >Builder: Thomas Brown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
      > >Commissioned: 6 August 1878
      > >Decommissioned: 17 July 1907
      > >Fate: Transferred to the U.S. Public Health Service, ultimate fate unknown.
      > >General characteristics
      > >Class and type: Bark, 3 masts
      > >Displacement: 142 tons (before 1895)
      > >Length: 115.4 ft (35.2 m) (before 1895)
      > >Beam: 24.9 ft (7.6 m)
      > >Draft: 12 ft (3.7 m)
      > >Propulsion: Sail
      > >Notes: School of Instruction training ship
      > >The USRC Salmon P. Chase was named after Abraham Lincoln's Secretary of the Treasury, Salmon Portland Chase. It was a three-masted bark with a hull length of 106-feet that was designed for use as a training ship for the cadets of the Revenue Cutter Service School of Instruction.
      > >Shortly after the creation of the Revenue Cutter School of Instruction, Revenue-Captain J. H. Merryman, the Revenue Cutter Service's Superintendent of Construction, began work on the design for a school ship to replace the USRC Dobbin. The Chase went into service in the summer of 1878, with its homeport at New Bedford, Massachusetts. Here she served as the Revenue Cutter School of Instruction's training ship. She made cadet cruises to Europe, the Azores, the West Indies, and along the eastern coast of the U.S. When in New Bedford, she tied up just above the bridge at the north end of Fish Island, Massachusetts. Here she served as a berthing area for the cadets. The government leased buildings on the north end of the island and used the nearby Mitchell Boat Company buildings for classes, drills, and storage. Most classes, however, were held aboard the Chase which had accommodations for a dozen cadets.
      > >In the late nineteenth century the service briefly enjoyed a surplus of officer candidates, largely because the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland was graduating more officers than the navy could employ. In 1890 the Chase was taken out of commission, and for the next four years the Revenue Cutter Service filled the ranks of its officer corps with Annapolis graduates. The 1890's, however, saw an expansion of the Navy, and in 1895 an Act of Congress provided for the retirement of numerous Revenue Cutter Service officers who were to ill or too old to perform their duties. The result was a shortage of junior officers, and a new lease on life for the service's training bark.
      > >The Chase was taken into dry dock, cut in half, and lengthened by forty feet; the new hull section made room for a total of twenty-five cadets. The alterations also seem to have affected the Chase's sailing qualities. Virtually every photograph taken after the rebuilding shows staysails set on the mizzen stays but none on the main.
      > >In its new configuration the Chase remained in service for two more decades, continuing to make practice cruises to Europe, including the port of Cadiz, Spain, in 1904, as well as the east coast ports of the United States. Her last official function was a visit to Hampton Roads, Virginia, for the Jamestown Tricentennial celebration of 1907. Her crew then transferred to the cutter USRC Itasca and the Chase was given to the U. S. Marine Hospital Service where she saw service as a quarantine vessel. At the end of her government career she was refitted and reclassified as a detention barge.
      > > 
      > > 
      > >From:Ray <ray@...>
      > >>To: usshipsoftheline@yahoogroups.com
      > >>Sent: Saturday, December 24, 2011 1:14 PM
      > >>Subject: [usshipsoftheline] USS Chase
      > >> 
      > >>I am in posession of the handwritten notes on "Seamanship and Engineering" of David N. Rial, a crew-member on USS "Chase". The notes are very detailed. They give, for example, exact details of the run of the standing and running rigging of the clew garnet, reef tackle, leech lines, bunt lines, main tack, main lifts and sheets, together with the location of blocks. The ship had fore, main and mizzen masts with a spanker, spars up to royals, and staysails. Included is a diagram of the rigging of the bowsprit.
      > >>
      > >>The notes are not dated, but following details of "Chase" are Rial's "Notes on USRC "Windom", Chesapeake Bay, (Butler's Hole), First day Sept 20, 1902" in which he details the anchor drill, man overboard drill, and diagrams of the Boiler room and engine.
      > >>
      > >>After a gap in the book he gives details of rifle drills, and formation of artillery crews and ammunition handling.
      > >>
      > >>From the sequence of the notes it appears that USS "Chase" was a pre-1902 three masted sailing ship.
      > >>
      > >>Wikipedia identifies only two ships with the name "Chase", one , a Clemson-class destroyer, commissioned in 1921 and decommissioned in 1930, the other a Buckley-class destroyer escort, commissioned in 1943 and decommissioned in 1946. Clearly neither of these are the "Chase" referred to in the notes.
      > >>
      > >>USRC "Windom" is identified as a Revenue Cutter completed in 1896 and disposed of in 1930.
      > >>
      > >>I'm afraid there is little further to go on, but can anyone help with identifying and providing further details of "USS Chase"?
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> 
      > >
      >
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