Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[usage-centered] Re: User validation of role and UC models

Expand Messages
  • Larry Constantine
    Kiril, We find that use cases are a near-perfect medium for communicating with users and clients. Some occasionally do find essential use cases to be too
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 20, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      Kiril,

      We find that use cases are a near-perfect medium for communicating with
      users and clients. Some occasionally do find essential use cases to be too
      abstract. In these situations we use concrete narratives derived from our
      essential narratives. I would recommend a trial run before concluding that
      your users can't cope with the abstract form.

      In validating a use case model, basically we say to the users, "Here are all
      the various things we understand that you need to accomplish and how they
      fit together. Does this make sense? If the system somehow allows you to do
      all these things, will you be able to do your job?" The validation of use
      cases can be part of a continuous refinement process. We have also done use
      case modeling collaboratively with users (Joint Essential Modeling), which
      is a good way to get a first-cut model that can be refined later into final
      form.

      In validating use cases with users and clients, we find it very important to
      incorporate preconditions and asynchronous extensions as well as showing
      unordered or partially ordered interaction. (See
      http://foruse.com/ApplicationNotes/AppNote3.htm.) Used appropriately, these
      can make the narratives much more realistic and recognizable to users.

      Abstract prototypes are problematic for many users. They are not used to
      seeing the contents of screens or pages divorced from how these look and
      function. A quasi-realistic paper prototype is easier for most users to
      understand. Some teams have had good success with a form intermediate
      between an abstract prototype (in the form of content and navigation models)
      and a realistic paper prototype. Some Web designers use what they call a
      "wire-frame" model which shows the layout of pages/forms in terms of
      outlines that block out how the interaction context is organized, how the
      available screen real estate is divided, and where various features will be
      found. You might find this useful for getting early feedback from your users
      on your design concepts.

      --Larry Constantine
      Director of Research & Development
      Constantine & Lockwood, Ltd.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.