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Re: [Elfrad-Group]==>[usa-tesla] The Electrical Conductivity of Liquids and or Solids Under Extreme Temp and Pressure

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  • Jim Farrer
    ... JSF 8/30/00 An earthquake could break the pipeline open, let in air, and the piezoelectric effect could ignite it, I d think. ... JSF 8/30/00
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 30, 2000
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      <snip>


      >
      > Karen... hope this helps a bit. Personally, I think that
      > naturally occurring piezoelectricity can even account for
      > some unexplained deaths due to explosions of natural gas
      > lines, etc... (as we have seen with the campers in the news
      > recently),? When something like a natural gas pipeline that
      > is buried in the ground... suddenly explodes without any
      > explanation to be found... it just might be Piezo-detenation?
      > >>>>

      JSF>> 8/30/00 An earthquake could break the pipeline open, let in air,
      and the piezoelectric effect could ignite it, I'd think.

      > JPM
      > "A nation of sheep will beget a government
      > of wolves." -- E.R. Murrow

      JSF>> 8/30/00 The government of wolves was devoured totally many years ago
      by those voracious animals known as DemoPublicans, and their mates,
      RepubloCratz.
      Jim
    • sno
      You are talking about fire-piston....here is link to how they work.... and where you can get one..... http://www.geocities.com/ResearchTriangle/System/5102/
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 30, 2000
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        You are talking about fire-piston....here is link to how they work....
        and where you can get one.....

        http://www.geocities.com/ResearchTriangle/System/5102/

        steve

        James P Moore wrote:

        >
        > Some tribes of Indians invented the diesel process to start there
        > fires when needed. A long hollow bamboo or other large cane
        > tube was fashioned, and then a long strait stick to match the tube
        > with a bit excess length ... was fitted with a fibrous plunger, that
        > had finely shreaded plant material material fixed to the bottom.
        >
        > When the stick was rammed down the tube with great speed and
        > force... the dry plant material on the bottom of the plunger was
        > ignited by the heat of the highly compressed air at the bottom of
        > the tube. So when the plunger was pulled out quickly... waa laa
        > instant fire without the need for matches or other laborious methods.
      • James Paul Moore
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 30, 2000
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        • Jim Farrer
          See JSF 8/31 below ... JSF 8/31 (1). Pipe springs a leak, pipeline is shut down. During repair, big quantity of air seeps in, un-noticed. Upon starting
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 31, 2000
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            See JSF>> 8/31 below

            David Knaack wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > [eGroups] My Groups | usa-tesla Main Page | Start a new
            > group!
            >
            > From: "Fred McGalliard" <frederick.b.mcgalliard@...>
            > > WRT the pipe line. I first thought it was a fuel air bomb, where the gas
            > > cloud formed and then exploded, but looking at the trench, it looks more
            > > like the the FAB exploded in the pipe itself. This would imply that the
            > > pipe had a lot of pressurized air in it. I thought of a long tube full
            > > of air, suddenly pressurized by natural gas, heating as the pressure
            > > head rushes down the tube.
            >
            > Seems unlikely, the pressure necessary to reach spontaneous combustion
            > of such a mixture is quite high, and I have a hard time believing that
            > they could let that much air get into the line.
            >
            > If I had to guess, I'd go with something more along the lines of a slow
            > leak in the pipe allowing the gas to saturate the surrounding soil,
            > possably sitting around for weeks or months until conditions were right
            > for it to detonate, blasting out all of saturated soil.
            >
            > But I'm no gas or explosives expert :)
            >
            > DK

            JSF>> 8/31 (1). Pipe springs a leak, pipeline is shut down. During repair,
            big quantity of air seeps in, un-noticed. Upon starting up, the valves are
            opened too suddenly. The air is heated up, and goes big bang.
            (2). A terrorist who has access to the pipeline adds a little to it, namely a
            side pipe. With that, and an air compressor, he/she feeds any desired quantity
            of air into the pipe. But how is this ignited? Perhaps when it goes around
            a bend in the pipeline?

            Natural gas pipelines run at 300 to 500 PSI, I have been told by workers at
            the local pumping station here in Rockville, Md. I'd think that oil pipelines
            would operate at similar pressures in order to get flow speed up to a high
            value.

            Jim
          • James P Moore
            ... Yes... this is basically what FM had suggested... but not with the terrorist angle... 300-500 PSI is more than enough to create a diesel effect detonation
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 1, 2000
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              ((snip))

              JSF>> 8/31  (1).  Pipe springs a leak, pipeline is shut down. 
              During repair,big quantity of air seeps in, un-noticed.  Upon
              starting up, the valves are opened too suddenly.  The air is
              heated up, and goes big bang.
              (2).  A terrorist who has access to the pipeline adds a l
              little to it, namely a side pipe.  With that, and an air
              compressor, he/she feeds any desired quantity
              of air into the pipe.  But how is this ignited? 
              Perhaps when it goes around a bend in the pipeline? 

              Natural gas pipelines run at 300 to 500 PSI, I have been
              told by workers at the local pumping station here in
              Rockville, Md. I'd think that oil pipelines
              would operate at similar pressures in order to get flow
              speed up to a high value.

              Jim

              Yes... this is basically what FM had suggested... but not
              with the terrorist angle... 300-500 PSI is more than enough
              to create a diesel effect detonation upon pump up, if an air
              pocket were in the line!

              JPM


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