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STRANGE Thunderstorm & "New" Lightning Rod

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  • Jim Farrer
    Approx 1615 hrs yesterday, a Tstorm hit with a series of loud explosions. Very sharp cracks. Approached from West, going about due East. Hail about 1/2 for
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 22, 2000
      Approx 1615 hrs yesterday, a Tstorm hit with a series of loud
      explosions. Very sharp cracks. Approached from West, going about
      due East. Hail about 1/2" for not over 1 minute. Storm gone
      in just 5 minutes. Never saw a close lightning strike. Quite
      windy, perhaps 20 to 30 mph gusts, but not anything compared
      to speed of storm. *UNIQUE* in my history. (My location is
      Rockville, MD., about 20 miles North of the formerly white house.

      Ten O'Clock news/weather commented on the unusual strikes, and
      said they were "Positive strikes." I didn't know the Weather
      Bureau was capable of determining this. Does anyone on the list
      know of this?

      This AM, TV Weather talked about lightning rods and a new
      development. They likened it to 'Star Wars," not knowing
      that one Nikola Tesla prescribed effectively the same idea 100 years
      ago. Of course, his idea used RF, not a laser. Only the frequency
      is different.
      The existing lightning rods were said to be 95% effective, but
      this extra 5% is too costly for power companies to accept. They
      showed a big lab, having a simulated cloud, which was a circular
      sheet of (I'd guess) plexiglas held horizontally about 20 feet off
      the floor, charged to a high D.C. potential.
      Their discharger was a sapphire laser pointed vertically at the
      'cloud.' Its job was to ionize the air and drain the charge
      from the cloud. BYF asked, "Won't that necessitate a laser setup
      for every large building which now has a lightning rod?" IMHO,
      YUP. Consider an elevated million gallon tank filled with
      liquid water. Pierce tank bottom with a BB gun (all right, a
      BEEG BB gun!). Tank pees onto ground below for perhaps a half
      second, then hole is sealed. I'd *guess* that the linear resistance
      in a cloud might be quite high, and that the cloud's voltage would
      be dissipated across this resistance, thus lowering the 'terminal'
      voltage, just as in a normal battery. When the terminal voltage
      is sufficiently lowered, the lightning strike would go out, but
      most of the charge would remain in the cloud. I also talked with
      her about a High Voltage long distance A.C. transmission line.
      I believe every tower along the way would require such a laser.
      The summed power of all of these lasers could be a huge loss.
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