Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

rah rah Bert

Expand Messages
  • Herzog
    for: Was this how Edward Leedskalnin built his Florida castle? Posted by: Bert Hickman bert.hickman@aquila.net bert_hickman Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:08 pm (PST)
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 1, 2009
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      for:
      Was this how Edward Leedskalnin built his Florida castle?
      Posted by: "Bert Hickman" bert.hickman@... bert_hickman
      Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:08 pm (PST)
      Interesting video about how one man can move incredibly heavy stuff -
      very clever techniques!

      http://j-walkblog.com/index.php?/weblog/posts/moving_big_rocks

      AND the great reply.
      Bert Hi Ted,
      >
      > Unfortunately, I live in Illinois, but we still may be able to help you
      > work through the capacitor problems.
      >
      > Capacitors can fail because of excessive current, excessive voltage,
      > excessive RF losses, or a combination. In particular, if you are using
      > Mylar (polyester) capacitors, they'll quickly overheat from within,
      > melt, and fail when used in a Tesla coil primary circuit. Ideally,
      > you'll want to use capacitors that use a polypropylene foil-film
      > dielectric system or Low density polyethylene if you are using homemade
      > caps. Also, for long life, the combined DC rating of your capacitors
      > should be at least 3X the faceplate voltage of your HV source - a 15 kV
      > Neon Sign Transformer (NST) requires using a capacitor bank that has a
      > 45 kVDC rating. If you are rolling your own, then oil immersion may
      > also
      > be essential. And finally, the capacitors must be capable of handling
      > the high currents seen in a Tesla Coil primary circuit when the gap
      > fires.
      >
      > To pinpoint the problems, we'll need a bit more information. What kind
      > of capacitors are you using (manufacturer, part number, capacitance,
      > voltage, and how many caps in series and parallel). Also, what are you
      > using for your high voltage source?
      >
      > Bert
      Thanks, Wil
      end
    • Ed Phillips
      for: Was this how Edward Leedskalnin built his Florida castle? Posted by: Bert Hickman bert.hickman@aquila.net
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 1, 2009
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        for:
        Was this how Edward Leedskalnin built his Florida castle?
        Posted by: "Bert Hickman" bert.hickman@...
        <mailto:bert.hickman%40aquila.net> bert_hickman
        Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:08 pm (PST)
        Interesting video about how one man can move incredibly heavy stuff -
        very clever techniques!

        http://j-walkblog.com/index.php?/weblog/posts/moving_big_rocks
        <http://j-walkblog.com/index.php?/weblog/posts/moving_big_rocks>

        AND the great reply."

        As the guy pointed out, it IS a very old technique which works just
        as well today. The technique of rocking something back and forth,
        putting blocks underneath at each rock, works fine for such things as
        refrigerators and most anything else which can be jacked up a bit to
        start with. I have an 1880's book by a noted English archaeologist
        Willima Flinders-Petrie who was digging in Egypt and came on a big
        statue buried a number of feet in the ground. He had no crane or hoist
        and was about to abandon it when his Egyptian foreman, just an ignorant
        peasant, told him "no sweat" or whatever the equivalent was in
        Egyptian. The statue was horizontal so the first thing the workmen did
        was to dig a hole at one end, just as in the movie, and tilt the base of
        the statue into it. Then they went about rocking it back and forth and
        putting shims underneath it until they'd lifted up to ground level and
        had it lying on its back again. After doing this they just dragged it
        downhill to a boat in the Nile river, sank the boat, rolled the statue
        into it, and then bailed out the boat. Statue weighed several tons but
        this whole process took only one morning.

        Amazing what brains and a lot of brawn can do. Both have been
        around in quantity for a very long time. Although it wasn't mentioned
        in the movie there's a general feeling that Stonhenge and similar
        structures were built by rather small groups of guys in their late teens
        and early 20's. The life expectancy wasn't much greater and the "older"
        men weren't up to the job.

        A bit far from Tesla but an interesting subject.

        Ed
      • Michael Riversong Education
        Not necessarily so far from Tesla. Remember, he was very concerned with natural resonance, and that s what we re dealing with here. Lately i ve gotten
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 2, 2009
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Not necessarily so far from Tesla. Remember, he was very concerned with natural resonance, and that's what we're dealing with here.

          Lately i've gotten obsessed with an idea that natural geometry is set up in 12 and 16 dimensions. this is said because the presence of 12 dimensions seems to produce 4 more. Still working on listing this out. For now, i'm using human sensory systems as a model of dimensions, and thus using the names of those systems as the names for dimensions. That is of course inadequate, but we have to start somewhere.

          What all of these builders seem to be doing, including Leedskalnin and our Egyptian friends, is to set up some sort of resonance among these dimensions. If you get the right rhythm, just rocking a large stone can get it moving anywhere you want. I've had to do that a couple times with granite boulders in Wyoming. Those boulders are exceptionally common up here.

          -----Original Message-----
          >From: Ed Phillips <evp@...>
          >Sent: Feb 1, 2009 3:25 PM
          >To: usa-tesla@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [usa-tesla] rah rah Bert
          >
          >for:
          >Was this how Edward Leedskalnin built his Florida castle?
          >Posted by: "Bert Hickman" bert.hickman@...
          ><mailto:bert.hickman%40aquila.net> bert_hickman
          >Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:08 pm (PST)
          >Interesting video about how one man can move incredibly heavy stuff -
          >very clever techniques!
          >
          >http://j-walkblog.com/index.php?/weblog/posts/moving_big_rocks
          ><http://j-walkblog.com/index.php?/weblog/posts/moving_big_rocks>
          >
          >AND the great reply."
          >
          > As the guy pointed out, it IS a very old technique which works just
          >as well today. The technique of rocking something back and forth,
          >putting blocks underneath at each rock, works fine for such things as
          >refrigerators and most anything else which can be jacked up a bit to
          >start with. I have an 1880's book by a noted English archaeologist
          >Willima Flinders-Petrie who was digging in Egypt and came on a big
          >statue buried a number of feet in the ground. He had no crane or hoist
          >and was about to abandon it when his Egyptian foreman, just an ignorant
          >peasant, told him "no sweat" or whatever the equivalent was in
          >Egyptian. The statue was horizontal so the first thing the workmen did
          >was to dig a hole at one end, just as in the movie, and tilt the base of
          >the statue into it. Then they went about rocking it back and forth and
          >putting shims underneath it until they'd lifted up to ground level and
          >had it lying on its back again. After doing this they just dragged it
          >downhill to a boat in the Nile river, sank the boat, rolled the statue
          >into it, and then bailed out the boat. Statue weighed several tons but
          >this whole process took only one morning.
          >
          > Amazing what brains and a lot of brawn can do. Both have been
          >around in quantity for a very long time. Although it wasn't mentioned
          >in the movie there's a general feeling that Stonhenge and similar
          >structures were built by rather small groups of guys in their late teens
          >and early 20's. The life expectancy wasn't much greater and the "older"
          >men weren't up to the job.
          >
          > A bit far from Tesla but an interesting subject.
          >
          >Ed
          >
          >
          >


          -- Michael Riversong
          Professional Teacher & Harpist
          Cheyenne, Wyoming
          (307)635-0900
          rivedu@...
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.