Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[Fwd: 1.7 GBit/s RNG by laser feedback]

Expand Messages
  • Reese
    Anyone who knows anything about random numbers and cryptography, some other applications, will appreciate this. JB, do you still have PHP installed? I don t,
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 24, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Anyone who knows anything about random numbers and cryptography,
      some other applications, will appreciate this.

      JB, do you still have PHP installed? I don't, but I still have
      my old secret.key and could install it on short notice. We need
      to talk about something.

      Reese

      --

      http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16109-laser-trick-churns-out-secure-random-numbers.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=physics-math

      Laser trick churns out secure random numbers

      * 18:00 23 November 2008 by Colin Barras

      Generating random numbers is harder than you might think, and the
      security of digital communications depends on it.

      Now a new method that uses lasers to produce streams of truly random
      numbers faster than ever before could help improve security at a time
      when digital traffic and cybercrime are both growing.

      Strings of random numbers are used to make secret keys and other parts
      of encryption protocols. But software that generates random numbers can
      generally only manage a close approximation to random. Statistical
      analysis reveals underlying if near-invisible patterns that mean an
      attacker could predict the sequence and break the code.

      Innovative ideas like tuning into atmospheric noise are sometimes used
      instead to achieve true chance. Now a new trick using the semiconductor
      lasers that power fibre-optic links offers a more practical way to
      improve security. Welcome feedback

      The new system can generate truly random numbers 10 times faster than
      existing devices, which can typically only produce 10s or 100s of
      megabits of random numbers per second, says Atsushi Uchida, an
      electrical engineer at Saitama University, Japan.

      Uchida and colleague Peter Davis, from NTT Communication Science
      Laboratories in Kyoto, can now generate truly random sequences at up to
      1.7 gigabits per second.

      They took a standard semiconductor laser and added an external mirror to
      reflect some of the light back inside the laser. That feedback causes
      the light produced to oscillate randomly. This can be converted into an
      AC current and then into a binary signal that can be used by a computer.

      Signals from two lasers are combined into a single, truly random number
      sequence.

      Relatively inexpensive versions of the system could be built into
      cryptographic systems for secure network links, or quantum communication
      systems, say the researchers.

      Journal reference: Nature Photonics (DOI: 10.1038/nphoton.2008.227)
    • Reese
      ... ^^^ Make that, PGP. Now y all know what I ve been up to lately. Reese
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 24, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Reese wrote:

        > JB, do you still have PHP installed? I don't, but I still have
        ^^^

        Make that, PGP. Now y'all know what I've been up to lately.

        Reese
      • Jet Black
        ... Has someone actually devised a _Truly_ Random Number generator ? Or is this unit just incredibly fast in its generation of Random Numbers
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 24, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In usa-tesla@yahoogroups.com, Reese <reeza@...> wrote:
          >
          > Anyone who knows anything about random numbers and cryptography,
          > some other applications, will appreciate this.

          Has someone actually devised a _Truly_ Random Number generator ?
          <BIG SURPRISE>
          Or is this unit just incredibly fast in its generation of "Random
          Numbers" ?

          Using the "feedback method" lazers bouncing off a few Lava Lamps (tm)
          were the last novel way I read about on generating Truly Random
          Numbers , that was waaay back when a ~600 to 800 Mega Htz computer
          was the fastest PC on the market.

          There's no argument that PC software alone can generate Truly Random
          Numbers it needs one or 2 "wildcard" inputs or stimulus of some sorts
          , to help mix up the numbers properly.

          The article mentions something about using atmospheric noise as one of
          those wildcards , it also mentions that they use 2 lazer emitters
          whose return signal is combined into one , maybe they have dragged out
          the old lava lamps & combined that signal with the reflected random
          audio sounds of nature.....


          > JB, do you still have PHP installed? I don't, but I still have
          > my old secret.key and could install it on short notice. We need
          > to talk about something.

          No PGP setup at all on my new PC here now.
          In these "interesting times" we live in I doubt that anything we write
          in plain text email or talk about over a unsecured line would up the
          level of chatter heard by all those PC's & people who process data
          looking for trouble , trends etc etc.

          For every measure there is a countermeasure.


          JB




          > Reese
          >
          > --
          >
          >
          http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16109-laser-trick-churns-out-secure-random-numbers.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=physics-math
          >
          > Laser trick churns out secure random numbers
          >
          > * 18:00 23 November 2008 by Colin Barras
          >
          > Generating random numbers is harder than you might think, and the
          > security of digital communications depends on it.
          >
          > Now a new method that uses lasers to produce streams of truly random
          > numbers faster than ever before could help improve security at a time
          > when digital traffic and cybercrime are both growing.
          >
          > Strings of random numbers are used to make secret keys and other parts
          > of encryption protocols. But software that generates random numbers can
          > generally only manage a close approximation to random. Statistical
          > analysis reveals underlying if near-invisible patterns that mean an
          > attacker could predict the sequence and break the code.
          >
          > Innovative ideas like tuning into atmospheric noise are sometimes used
          > instead to achieve true chance. Now a new trick using the semiconductor
          > lasers that power fibre-optic links offers a more practical way to
          > improve security. Welcome feedback
          >
          > The new system can generate truly random numbers 10 times faster than
          > existing devices, which can typically only produce 10s or 100s of
          > megabits of random numbers per second, says Atsushi Uchida, an
          > electrical engineer at Saitama University, Japan.
          >
          > Uchida and colleague Peter Davis, from NTT Communication Science
          > Laboratories in Kyoto, can now generate truly random sequences at up to
          > 1.7 gigabits per second.
          >
          > They took a standard semiconductor laser and added an external mirror to
          > reflect some of the light back inside the laser. That feedback causes
          > the light produced to oscillate randomly. This can be converted into an
          > AC current and then into a binary signal that can be used by a computer.
          >
          > Signals from two lasers are combined into a single, truly random number
          > sequence.
          >
          > Relatively inexpensive versions of the system could be built into
          > cryptographic systems for secure network links, or quantum communication
          > systems, say the researchers.
          >
          > Journal reference: Nature Photonics (DOI: 10.1038/nphoton.2008.227)
          >
        • Bill Beaty
          ... http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16109-laser-trick-churns-out-secure-random-numbers.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=physics-math ... That feedback DOES NOT
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 24, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In usa-tesla@yahoogroups.com, Reese <reeza@...> wrote:

            >
            http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16109-laser-trick-churns-out-secure-random-numbers.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=physics-math
            > They took a standard semiconductor laser and added an external mirror to
            > reflect some of the light back inside the laser. That feedback causes
            > the light produced to oscillate randomly.


            That feedback DOES NOT create random laser oscillation. They don't
            know what they're talking about. Go search on "laser chaos" or use
            keywords +laser +"chaotic oscillation"

            Chaos is not random, since each instant value of the signal depends on
            the previous sequence. The signal is full of fractal patterns. In
            other words, it's a pseudo-random number generator, but based on
            amplifier feedback. Software P-RNGs use a shift register to store
            the required sequence. Lasers store the sequence as time-delayed
            light flying between the mirrors.


            > Signals from two lasers are combined into a single, truly random number
            > sequence.

            Bingo. IF IT WAS RANDOM, WHY DO THEY NEED TO ADD TWO SIGNALS
            TOGETHER? It's because chaotic lasers produce chaos, not whitenoise.

            PS
            You can try this out yourself with an amplifier, loudspeaker, and
            microphone. First produce some feedback by waving the microphone
            near the speaker. Then add pieces of sheet metal reflectors to create
            extra audio paths. Mess around with it and you'll get weird
            scratching buzzing effects, not just the usual squeals. Motorbike
            engine noise? Them's chaos oscillations, paw! But they don't sound
            much like white noise, now do they? I guess you'll have to add two
            together? But that will just give you a biker rally, not a
            whitenoise signal.
          • ftl
            I have this comm s setup running as I check this Text work :) JB I have found a device built by M$ that is a very easy , near idiot proof thing to attach to
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 27, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              I have this comm's setup running as I check this Text work :)

              JB


              I have found a device built by M$ that is a very easy , near idiot proof
              thing to attach to your computers USB port.

              http://www.microsoft.com/hardware/digitalcommunication/ProductDetails.aspx?pid=004

              RRP US ~$70

              you can get it for less if you shop around.

              or any other _hardwired_ headset with mic setup you may have at hand or
              can improvise , hack , McGuyver together.


              Mix it in with a product called Teamspeak 2
              http://www.teamspeak.com/


              <take a break to look over Teamspeak>



              http://www.ara-deathfromabove.com/joomla/
              if you look at the url now you should see a suitable aka for me on it now
              red led

              These guys use TS to communicate whilst playing a tweaked "war simulation
              game" , laws of Physics do not apply inside of game.You do not have to
              install or buy the game to use or try Teamspeak.


              teamspeak IP is 84.xx.127.RT:bfgt

              is read from the URL above then copied off the web page.

              If you are interested in building an upgraded audio version of this list ,
              it can be done , at a price.

              A 21st Century Roman Forum of sorts......



              It may not be Tesla based technology , but it does part of the Tesla
              Communications vision very well , for a price.


              If you have this setup or have Teamspeak setup & don't know where to go....

              Email me for the =ArA= Teamspeak entry password , then you can log on & we
              can have proper chat about Tesla & stuff


              JB
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.