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Re: [usa-tesla] CAR BATTERIES ARE NOT 12 VOLTS

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  • Reese
    ... Not directly, as you note (transistorized, en bloc components. If you were to spend some time with a seasoned mechanic in the service department down at
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 4, 2005
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      At 06:01 04-12-05 -0800, jim farrer wrote:
      >MOST informative, Reese! Thank you.
      >
      >Is there any way to set the alternator output voltage?

      Not directly, as you note (transistorized, en bloc components. If you
      were to spend some time with a seasoned mechanic in the service department
      down at the Chevy dealership though, you may be able to figure out which
      years had battery type X and which had battery type Y, and thereby know
      which year regulator module to install to match up with the type battery
      you are using. Alternately, since yours is detached from the alternator,
      you may be able to fabricate your own, though that may be more trouble
      than you want to go to. Myself, I'm often enough under the hood I don't
      mind topping off the battery with some distilled water now & then, so I
      tend to favor deep cycle batteries, 14.8 is too much for them anyway.

      Reese



      >We used to have an external voltage and current regulator which wore out repeatedly, as its 3 relays were constantly making and breaking to keep the voltage and current in line, But they had no adjustments that I'm aware of. Then our wonderful auto manufacturers dropped that old box, and installed the voltage and current regulator, now transistorized, onto a ceramic block right inside the alternator, where its transistors could get nice and hot. I've overhauled several of these alternators over the years, and never seen anything that looks like an adjustment. I have a motorhome, whose alternator has no internal regulator (yipee!), but is in an outside box - transistorized of course. Chevy
      >454 engine.
      >
      >Jim Farrer
      >
      >
      >Reese <reeza@...> wrote:
      >From <http://www.landiss.com/battery.htm>http://www.landiss.com/battery.htm
      >
      >"However, lead/calcium batteries are not very resistant to "deep-cycling" (deep discharge followed by a full charge). This made them inappropriate for uses such as to power trolling motors in fishing boats. It also required a higher charging voltage. General Motors studied the charging characteristics of lead/calcium batteries and set the voltage regulators of cars equipped with the "Delco Freedom II" battery at 14.8 volts. Lower settings prevented charging to full capacity. This is too high for lead/antimony batteries and will cause them to lose water rapidly."
      >
      >There is a bit more, but the bit about what the voltage regulator should
      >be set at according to the battery type caught my eye. It lends credence
      >to the claim, "car batteries don't die, they are killed."
      >
      >Reese
    • Reese
      ... All that makes me wonder though, how might a battery alloyed with antimony be distinguished from one alloyed with calcium? Reese
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 4, 2005
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        >From <http://www.landiss.com/battery.htm>http://www.landiss.com/battery.htm
        >
        >"However, lead/calcium batteries are not very resistant to "deep-cycling"
        >(deep discharge followed by a full charge). This made them inappropriate for
        >uses such as to power trolling motors in fishing boats. It also required a
        >higher charging voltage. General Motors studied the charging characteristics
        >of lead/calcium batteries and set the voltage regulators of cars equipped
        >with the "Delco Freedom II" battery at 14.8 volts. Lower settings prevented
        >charging to full capacity. This is too high for lead/antimony batteries and
        >will cause them to lose water rapidly."

        All that makes me wonder though, how might a battery alloyed with antimony
        be distinguished from one alloyed with calcium?

        Reese
      • davep@quik.com
        Automobile regulators are not, commonly, made to allow adjustment. (some for Motorcycles are). There is an assumption that the battery used will match. 8)
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 4, 2005
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          Automobile regulators are not, commonly, made to
          allow adjustment. (some for Motorcycles are).

          There is an assumption that the battery used will match.
          8)>>

          When technology changes, sometimes the existing
          tech dpoes not keep track, careful reading/searching of the
          manufacturers spec for the reg will find some mention.

          > All that makes me wonder though, how might a battery alloyed with
          > antimony be distinguished from one alloyed with calcium?
          In the case of professional stationary batteries, its commonly
          molded into the terminal, what the alloying is.. Sometimes
          marked on auto battery cases, or keep digging (manufactuer
          website, etc) for Real Specs.

          Or one could make detail measurments, wit precise voltmeters and
          reason backwards. An error prone process, tho.

          best
          dwp
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