Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [usa-tesla] mercury

Expand Messages
  • Jim Farrer
    Back in that Victorian era I grew up in Mason City Iowa. Our town had its own PG & E very early in the A.C. electricity game. The plant was quite old when
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 5, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Back in "that Victorian era" I grew up in Mason City Iowa. Our town had
      its own
      PG & E very early in the A.C. electricity game. The plant was quite old
      when Dad and
      I took a tour through the electric generation plant (plant also
      contained the city's "coal gas"
      generation plant, complete with huge, expanding storage tank) This was
      in early days of
      WW II, around 1943.

      The operating engineer took us through the plant, and explained what we
      were seeing.
      He claimed there were two turbines. A mercury boiler fed the first
      turbine with mercury
      gas. The 2nd turbine was steam, generated by the spent mercury vapor
      before being
      returned to the mercury boiler.

      Many years and greatly expanding doubts later, I looked this up in my
      1950 encyclopedia.
      Sure enough, some 7 of these Hg plants were built. Article didn't state
      their locations.
      Pity.

      Were both my dad and I fed a kettle of GHOTI (fish)? If any people
      were harmed by
      this in any way, I never heard of it. GH as in enuF O as in Women
      TI as in naSHun.
      (nation).

      NowthatI'vetotallydestroyedmycredibility:

      I've often read that liquid sodium was the initial coolant in nuclear
      reactor cores, and
      even the the atomic sub[s] (all? dunno). I too, have wondered about
      the start up
      process. Sodium is a very good conductor of heat, BUT: the tons and
      tons of it in
      a nuclear facility? This would be like starting your car at 80 below
      zero, with even the
      antifreeze frozen. how do you get the entire engine, the radiator with
      all its small tubes,
      the hoses, blah, blah warm enough to melt?

      AND: liquid sodium flowing, in DIRECT contact with the reactor fuel rods?
      Now *there's* an engineering job!

      Jim Farrer


      herzog@... wrote:

      > Interesting info on mercury. There aren't any aluminum turbine blades
      > that
      > I know of....But back in the Victorian Era, there were electrical power
      > plants that operated on a Mercury cycle. That is , using tons of liquid
      > mercury flashed to vapor in a boiler, and run through a turbine, just
      > like a
      > 'heavy-metal' version of today's power plant. I don't know how long the
      > plant operators lasted, before they fell victim to Mad Hatter's disease.
      >
      > John/WH
      > Wil says, also that sodium was claimed to be in a thermal cycle using
      > mirrors, in Arizona (state). The only sodium I'd ever seen was in Chem
      > Lab, small SOLID piece, so I wonder to this day how they ever got it all
      > hot enough to get it started.
      > Also was rumored to be in atomic subs's cycle.
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      > ADVERTISEMENT
      > <http://us.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=129lega25/M=295196.4901138.6071305.3001176/D=groups/S=1705083235:HM/EXP=1097027964/A=2128215/R=0/SIG=10se96mf6/*http://companion.yahoo.com>
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      > * To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/usa-tesla/
      >
      > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > usa-tesla-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:usa-tesla-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
      >
      > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
      > Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
      >
      >
    • McGalliard, Frederick B
      ... I checked recently. You would only have to heat the tubes up to about 100C to liquefy the sodium. Drain it from the outlying tubes into a storage tank
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 5, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Jim Farrer [mailto:jfarrer@...]
        ...
        > I've often read that liquid sodium was the initial coolant in nuclear
        > reactor cores, and
        > even the the atomic sub[s] (all? dunno). I too, have
        > wondered about the start up process.

        I checked recently. You would only have to heat the tubes up to about
        100C to liquefy the sodium. Drain it from the outlying tubes into a
        storage tank above the core when you shut down, then idle the reactor
        for a while till the metal is molten on start up. Shouldn't be too hard.
      • Jim Dooley
        Fred, Sodium was indeed used in reactors and may still be. It was used as the medium which carries the heat of the nuclear reaction out of the reactor core
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 5, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Fred,
           
          Sodium was indeed used in reactors and may still be.  It was used as the medium which carries the heat of the nuclear reaction out of the reactor core into the heat exchanger to be used in boiling the feedwater into steam for the turbines.  However, it has to be kept totally isolated.  If ever there were a leak in the heat exchanger tubes and water mixed with the liquid sodium...let's just say I wouldn't want to be around.
           
          Jim Dooley
          -----Original Message-----
          From: McGalliard, Frederick B [mailto:frederick.b.mcgalliard@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, October 05, 2004 9:33 AM
          To: usa-tesla@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [usa-tesla] mercury



          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Jim Farrer [mailto:jfarrer@...]
          ...
          > I've often read that liquid sodium was the initial coolant in nuclear
          > reactor cores, and
          > even the the atomic sub[s]    (all? dunno).  I too, have
          > wondered about the start up process.

          I checked recently. You would only have to heat the tubes up to about
          100C to liquefy the sodium. Drain it from the outlying tubes into a
          storage tank above the core when you shut down, then idle the reactor
          for a while till the metal is molten on start up. Shouldn't be too hard.


        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.