Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: About scalar waves...

Expand Messages
  • Derek
    This is an excellent question you guys are discussing. Here is my thought: A receptor of scalar waves - whatever they are - is probably proportional to the
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 26, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      This is an excellent question you guys are discussing.

      Here is my thought: A receptor of 'scalar waves' - whatever they are -
      is probably proportional to the electromagnetic stress in the
      receiver. This stress can be induced by charging a capacitor, for
      example. Tesla himself in US patents 685953 through 685958 points
      this out by proposing to connect a large copper sheet to a charged
      capacitor. According to his patents, this is supposed to manifest an
      additional voltage proportional to the transmitter signal, where the
      transmitter is the magnifying transmitter. The signal is also
      proportional to the area of the copper sheet, and most importantly,
      proportional to the applied DC bias voltage on the capacitor.

      At this point -- assuming this invention works as advertised -- we
      will receive an AC signal on the charged capacitor, at the frequency
      of the transmitter. However, as has been pointed out, we do not know
      that this is not just some type of capacitive or inductive coupling.

      I suggest that a way to isolate the usual capacitive/inductive
      coupling from any potential novel effect (indicative of scalar waves)
      is to make the stress on the capacitor an alternating voltage, not
      just a DC voltage as proposed by Tesla. That is, you would connect
      the capacitor to a high voltage AC source, eg a resonant transformer,
      at say freq=f1. The source (magnifying transmitter/tesla coil)
      operates at say frequency f2. Because the received signal is
      proportional to both the transmit signal and the received biasing
      (stressing) signal, the novel component on the capacitor will be at
      freq = f1+f2, because of the multiplication. That is, the capacitor
      will have in fact three frequency components on it, f1 (the applied
      AC receiver stressing voltage), f2 (the transmitter signal), and
      f1+f2 (the novel signal). Maxwell's equations are fundamentally
      linear and only predict the existence of f1 and f2, but no f1+f2. The
      existence of f1+f2 is evidence for new physics. This new frequency
      component could be measured in the presence of the other maxwellian
      components using a spectrum analyzer. Component f2 may be
      particularly large b/c it is applied to the receiver, so a notch
      filter may be needed to knock down f2 so that f1+f2 may be observed.

      This is a general idea which I think can be applied again and again
      when looking for new electromagnetic forces (such as scalar waves).
      Turning to a different application, if you look at for example Harold
      Aspden's book Physics Unified (Chapter 1), he proposes new
      electromagnetic force laws, which coincide with our well-known
      Maxwellian laws for closed circuits. However for open circuits (such
      a spark gap-discharge, as used in Tesla coils/magnifying
      transmitters), there is predicted divergence from Maxwell. This new
      electromagnetic force law is fundamentally nonlinear. Where there is
      nonlinearity, there is hope for a clean separation from Maxwellian
      physics, which is linear. We all know that nonlinear phenomenon give
      rise to mixing effects, ie, new frequency components. We can look for
      these new frequency components as evidence for new non-maxwellian
      (nonlinear) phenomena.

      Derek



      --- In usa-tesla@yahoogroups.com, Riversong Education <rivedu@e...>
      wrote:
      > This has been a conundrum for me over the course of many years. I
      first
      > became aware of the possible existence of a "scalar" form of energy
      > separate from electricity due to lectures by Tom Beardon back in
      1984!
      >
      > Here are just a few meagre clues that may assist us in the design
      of
      > such an instrument:
      >
      > Scalar energy, as postulated in Beardon's work, happens to behave a
      lot
      > like sound. Therefore, any transducer setup that does not use
      > electricity could be a promising avenue.
      >
      > If this energy is really equivalent to what ancient Chinese
      scientists
      > described as "Ch'i or Qi", then we have little hope of ever
      detecting it
      > outside of our own trained sensory systems.
      >
      > Piezoelectric detectors, as specified by Dan Davidson, have some
      > potential for detecting the interface between gravity and
      > electromagnetism, which also appears to behave in a scalar manner.
      >
      > On Tuesday, March 9, 2004, at 10:44 AM, cirrex2001 wrote:
      >
      > > Hello Friends...
      > > Anyone can suggest a schematic for a sensitive scalar detector
      that
      > > not react to general electricity?
      > > Lot of thanks.
      > > Cyrano
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
    • Atomino
      Hi,Derek.. Compliments for you theory...Seems that work,also..Look this link:http://www.orgonelab.org/ylemeter.htm You describe the same principle of this
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 26, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
         
        Hi,Derek..
        Compliments for you theory...Seems that work,also..Look this link:http://www.orgonelab.org/ylemeter.htm
        You describe the same principle of this experimental orgone detector.Orgone is another name made by the psychologist W.Reich to call scalar energy.
        If you want to complete the work post a electronic schematic based on your theory...
        thanks for your collaboration..
        Cyrano.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Derek
        Sent: Friday, March 26, 2004 10:49 AM
        Subject: [usa-tesla] Re: About scalar waves...

        This is an excellent question you guys are discussing.

        Here is my thought: A receptor of 'scalar waves' - whatever they are -
        is probably proportional to the electromagnetic stress in the
        receiver. This stress can be induced by charging a capacitor, for
        example. Tesla himself in US patents 685953 through 685958 points
        this out by proposing to connect a large copper sheet to a charged
        capacitor. According to his patents, this is supposed to manifest an
        additional voltage proportional to the transmitter signal, where the
        transmitter is the magnifying transmitter. The signal is also
        proportional to the area of the copper sheet, and most importantly,
        proportional to the applied DC bias voltage on the capacitor.

        At this point -- assuming this invention works as advertised -- we
        will receive an AC signal on the charged capacitor, at the frequency
        of the transmitter. However, as has been pointed out, we do not know
        that this is not just some type of capacitive or inductive coupling.

        I suggest that a way to isolate the usual capacitive/inductive
        coupling from any potential novel effect (indicative of scalar waves)
        is to make the stress on the capacitor an alternating voltage, not
        just a DC voltage as proposed by Tesla. That is, you would connect
        the capacitor to a high voltage AC source, eg a resonant transformer,
        at say freq=f1. The source (magnifying transmitter/tesla coil)
        operates at say frequency f2. Because the received signal is
        proportional to both the transmit signal and the received biasing
        (stressing) signal, the novel component on the capacitor will be at
        freq = f1+f2, because of the multiplication. That is, the capacitor
        will have in fact three frequency components on it, f1 (the applied
        AC receiver stressing voltage), f2 (the transmitter signal), and
        f1+f2 (the novel signal). Maxwell's equations are fundamentally
        linear and only predict the existence of f1 and f2, but no f1+f2. The
        existence of f1+f2 is evidence for new physics. This new frequency
        component could be measured in the presence of the other maxwellian
        components using a spectrum analyzer. Component f2 may be
        particularly large b/c it is applied to the receiver, so a notch
        filter may be needed to knock down f2 so that f1+f2 may be observed.

        This is a general idea which I think can be applied again and again
        when looking for new electromagnetic forces (such as scalar waves).
        Turning to a different application, if you look at for example Harold
        Aspden's book Physics Unified (Chapter 1), he proposes new
        electromagnetic force laws, which coincide with our well-known
        Maxwellian laws for closed circuits. However for open circuits (such
        a spark gap-discharge, as used in Tesla coils/magnifying
        transmitters), there is predicted divergence from Maxwell. This new
        electromagnetic force law is fundamentally nonlinear. Where there is
        nonlinearity, there is hope for a clean separation from Maxwellian
        physics, which is linear. We all know that nonlinear phenomenon give
        rise to mixing effects, ie, new frequency components. We can look for
        these new frequency components as evidence for new non-maxwellian
        (nonlinear) phenomena.

        Derek



        --- In usa-tesla@yahoogroups.com, Riversong Education <rivedu@e...>
        wrote:
        > This has been a conundrum for me over the course of many years.  I
        first
        > became aware of the possible existence of a "scalar" form of energy
        > separate from electricity due to lectures by Tom Beardon back in
        1984!
        >
        > Here are just a few meagre clues that may assist us in the design
        of
        > such an instrument:
        >
        > Scalar energy, as postulated in Beardon's work, happens to behave a
        lot
        > like sound.  Therefore, any transducer setup that does not use
        > electricity could be a promising avenue.
        >
        > If this energy is really equivalent to what ancient Chinese
        scientists
        > described as "Ch'i or Qi", then we have little hope of ever
        detecting it
        > outside of our own trained sensory systems.
        >
        > Piezoelectric detectors, as specified by Dan Davidson, have some
        > potential for detecting the interface between gravity and
        > electromagnetism, which also appears to behave in a scalar manner.
        >
        > On Tuesday, March 9, 2004, at 10:44 AM, cirrex2001 wrote:
        >
        > > Hello Friends...
        > > Anyone can suggest a schematic for a sensitive scalar detector
        that
        > > not react to general electricity?
        > > Lot of thanks.
        > > Cyrano
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >


      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.