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Re: [usa-tesla] Re: Eddy Current Research

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  • Ed Phillips
    A thought. If you measured the AC resistance at a fairly high ... Nice thought. How can I run such a test? Do I need to tune to the resonant
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 23, 2004
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      "> A thought. If you measured the AC resistance at a fairly high
      > frequency while dropping your magnet through the tube you'd have an
      > independent measurement by which to test your theory. Have you thought
      > of trying that?

      Nice thought. How can I run such a test? Do I need to tune to the
      resonant
      frequency of the test cables? This is an area I don't know much about.

      How would I input the frequency into the tube, through the terminals or
      across the tube length? I suppose I could just try it and find out. I
      probably have whatever equipment is necessary.

      Dave"

      Dave:

      The first part of your post is beyond my mathematical depth, but this
      question is one I can answer. Instead of using a DC ohmmeter in your
      test, just connect a source of perhaps an amp or so of 60 Hz current and
      measure the AC voltage drop between a couple of other points just as
      close to the slit. (The second set of connections is to eliminate any
      effect of voltage drop through the exciting connection. Annalogous to a
      "four-point" prove.) Without knowing the exact resistance you can still
      observe the voltage drop and see if it changes when you move the magnet
      through the tube, since that's the effect you're looking for. A scope
      would be a convenient monitoring device as it would give you
      instantaneous readings as the magnet moved. The voltage will be
      millivolts at most but should be observable.

      Ed
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