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Hansen and Fine

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  • mandreox
    A.M. Fine was a gay activist avant le fait. I happened to be in an outdoor cafe c. 1972, and Al Hansen, Beck s grand dad, was at another table. I greatly
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 18, 2005
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      A.M. Fine was a gay activist avant le fait. I happened to be in an
      outdoor cafe c. 1972, and Al Hansen, Beck's grand dad, was at another
      table. I greatly admired Al's primer on happenings. Suddenly this
      weird street guy pointed at Hansen and started accusingly chanting
      maggot/faggot, maggot/faggot! A few months later I met this street
      guy at Buecker & Harpsichords, an art gallery. It was Albert Fine. My
      guess is Al had manifested undue heterosexuality and Albert was
      punishing him with some real performance art.

      --- "Warren Woessner" wrote:
      The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis had a Fluxus exhibit in 1993, and
      published a book "In the Spirit of Fluxus"


      -----Original Message-----
      On Behalf Of voxhaul@A...
      Friday, June 10, 2005 10:14 AM
      Subject: Re: [Unmuzzled Ox] Corso, Gregory (Nunzio) (1930- )

      Jackson Maclow was involved with Fluxus as were several NYC
      composers like George Maciunas John Cage and performance artist Dick
      Higgins--also I think Ray Johnson the artist was involved with
      them--the modern pop star Beck is the grandson of Al Hansen the
      Fluxus pioneer and has used some of Hansen's work in his stage
      performances...the rock band Sonic Youth has also used some of
      macunias' work as a reference/influence--there is a strain of
      influence
      through Lamonte Young to Philip Glass and Arthur Russell
      (Russell the
      east village composer who is being rediscovered was an early
      champion
      of Maclow's work and was Ginsberg's primary music teacher)--
      and
      John
      cage's work with Merce Cunnigham and Dick Higgins performance
      art were
      seminal in the generation of post-Cunningham dancers like
      Barbara
      Dilley and Douglas Dunn who founded Grand Union and developed
      the
      contact improv school of dance which was taught and performed
      at
      Naropa
      School which was founded of course by Ginsberg--so actually
      there is
      much interweaving of influence and inspiration from Fluxus
      through the
      Beats to the so-called NY School of poetry/art
      (O'Hara/Ashberry/Larry
      Rivers/Kenneth Koch/Ted Berrigan) and a whole generation of
      younger NYC
      artists...sorry if I am rambling I might come up with
      something
      more
      coherent if I think some more...Steven Hall

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Kirby Olson <kirbyolson2@h...>
      > To: unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Fri, 10 Jun 2005 13:13:28 +0000
      > Subject: RE: [Unmuzzled Ox] Corso, Gregory (Nunzio) (1930- )
      >
      > Fluxus doesn't get a lot of coverage in the hinterlands.
      > Yoko Ono,
      > yes, but
      > not Fluxus generally. There is a poet named Mike Topp who
      lives
      > in NYC
      > around 14th and B, and he is quite influenced by Fluxus. I
      > don't know
      > of
      > anybody else who is. Topp is around 45.
      >
      > What was the connection between the Beats and Fluxus? Corso
      > slept with
      > a
      > woman designer who was in that movement, I think. Her name
      > begins with
      > an
      > M. I think it was a one-word name. Is she still around? Did
      > she ever
      > write about Corso?
      >
      > I'm trying to compile a book of anecdotes on Corso and what is
      > missing
      > are
      > the women. I have about thirty anecdotes so far, but all are
      by
      > men.
      > Corso
      > had so many lovers. Perhaps a few of them would be willing to
      > break
      > their
      > discretion and say something about what he was like!
      >
      > Another thing -- it was always thought that his mother went
      back
      > to
      > Italy.
      > But how or why would she go back? She was 17, and had arrived
      > at the
      > beginning of the Great Depression. She apparently lived her
      > whole life
      > in
      > northern New Jersey, and even five years ago was still alive.
      > It would
      > be
      > fascinating to get her anecdote of leaving Corso. I would
      also
      > like to
      > track down surviving members of the families in which Corso
      was
      > fostered.
      > There is an impression that Corso was always poor -- but the
      > families
      > that
      > he stayed with until he was eleven were quite wealthy -- they
      > had to be
      > --
      > and so Corso lived a very uneven childhood.
      >
      > -- Kirby Olson
      >
      >
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