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Sports and Politics

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  • mandreox
    Sports and politics preoccupy me. I particularly like sports because, though few of my friends follow them, the guys in bars and on the Staten Island Ferry
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2005
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      Sports and politics preoccupy me. I particularly like sports because,
      though few of my friends follow them, the guys in bars and on the
      Staten Island Ferry usually do. Talking about sports is a way out of my
      usual life.

      I'm partisan about both. I hate Bush and love the Giants, Yankees and
      Rangers. I hate the Red Sox, Angels and Maple Leafs and wish Kerry were
      president. I despised Prime Minister Mulroney and loved Prime Minister
      Trudeau. I cheer for all things Canadian--except the Maple Leafs.

      Kirby seems to be a fan of Bush, but no one else who posts here admits
      to that. Poltics becomes more serious when there's a war involved, be
      it Korea or Vietnam or Iraq. Nevertheless art and poetry and music are
      not as temporary, and represent a better escape than Monday Night
      Football. Moaning about politics just makes me sad. Bush will be with
      us another three years. There's little I can do about it.
    • Kirby Olson
      I would rather have had Joseph Lieberman as president, but couldn t stand Kerry or his wife. I do like Bush better than Kerry. I think minimally a president
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 2005
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        I would rather have had Joseph Lieberman as president, but couldn't stand
        Kerry or his wife.

        I do like Bush better than Kerry. I think minimally a president has to have
        a clear set of values and be willing to act on them. Kerry didn't seem to
        have clear values. He was a Catholic, but he was pro-abortion, except that
        he wasn't. He had been a good soldier, but he was against war, except that
        he would have expanded the army in Iraq. All of his positions seemed to go
        in circles.

        I found his wife's hair to be exceptionally frustrating, and am glad I don't
        have to look at it for four years. Bush's wife is much better looking and
        plus she's a librarian. I find her fun.

        The guy from North Carolina -- Edwards -- his wife was very ugly (way fat)
        but she had a good mind. Had he been first on the ticket I wouldn't have
        minded her as first lady.

        Sometimes I fear that after four years among the extreme ultra-hip radicals
        at the University of Washington I have come to the point where anything to
        the left is anathema to me, and anything that pisses off the left is to me a
        grim joy. I was never a Marxist. Always kind of liked anarchists. Still
        do.

        I am against totalitarian corporate control, and for the individual.
        Between the tyrannical left and the tyrannical right, I keep hoping there is
        some small space left for individuals to decide at least whether or not they
        can turn over in bed at night and choose when to do it, and to find a
        comfortable resting posture. In Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge even this
        was monitored. I'm sure the Calvinists at Plymouth rock would have also
        wanted that level of intrusion.

        I'd just like a little peace and privacy. Bush's new nominee to the court,
        whatever else, is a staunch champion of the first amendment. That's good, I
        think. It's the most precious of our freedoms.

        I know everybody thinks the abortion issue is the central one. None of the
        hot button issues mean anything at all to me.

        Fourth down, on the third yard line. Alitto about to enter the end zone.

        The only sport I love is badminton.




        >From: mandreox <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
        >Reply-To: unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com
        >To: unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [Unmuzzled Ox] Sports and Politics
        >Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 08:52:06 -0000
        >
        >Sports and politics preoccupy me. I particularly like sports because,
        >though few of my friends follow them, the guys in bars and on the
        >Staten Island Ferry usually do. Talking about sports is a way out of my
        >usual life.
        >
        >I'm partisan about both. I hate Bush and love the Giants, Yankees and
        >Rangers. I hate the Red Sox, Angels and Maple Leafs and wish Kerry were
        >president. I despised Prime Minister Mulroney and loved Prime Minister
        >Trudeau. I cheer for all things Canadian--except the Maple Leafs.
        >
        >Kirby seems to be a fan of Bush, but no one else who posts here admits
        >to that. Poltics becomes more serious when there's a war involved, be
        >it Korea or Vietnam or Iraq. Nevertheless art and poetry and music are
        >not as temporary, and represent a better escape than Monday Night
        >Football. Moaning about politics just makes me sad. Bush will be with
        >us another three years. There's little I can do about it.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • souvienstoidemoublier
        I think about spectator sports more as a general phenomenon than as something where the ephemeral details interest me. I suspect there is something about it
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 6, 2005
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          I think about spectator sports more as a general phenomenon than as
          something where the ephemeral details interest me. I suspect there is
          something about it that may be a bit too weird for me, even though I
          can get into other vicarious things like movies and sometimes almost
          have a time not saying "Get out of that house" ["Felicia's Journey"]
          or "Get out of that car and tell him/her that you love him/her"
          ["Breakfast at Tiffanys", "Love Actually"]. . .

          I suspect sports provides this way of getting involved in something
          without really getting involved in anything [or anything of "real"
          consequence?] and then experience a catharsis or some such thing in
          regard to feelings of hostility, frustration, powerlessness . . . One
          thing about it all that seems bizarre to me is that the spectator has
          loyalty, often based on geography, but it is loyalty to something that
          changes on the basis of money. It is like saluting a flag where the
          stars are going to be traded, "Did you hear that California, Arizona,
          and New Mexico are no longer on the flag, they got traded to Mexico
          and Japan and are replaced by Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan . . ."

          One can also have a lot of opinions, judgments and predictions in
          regard to something that ultimately may not matter that much.

          I believe there are some things we can try doing in regard to Bush
          such as letter campaigns, helping to fund advertising and so on. I am
          not doing them, though. Not because I support him, I am just doing
          other things . . .

          --- In unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com, mandreox <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          >
          > Sports and politics preoccupy me. I particularly like sports
          because,
          > though few of my friends follow them, the guys in bars and on the
          > Staten Island Ferry usually do. Talking about sports is a way out of
          my
          > usual life.
          >
          > I'm partisan about both. I hate Bush and love the Giants, Yankees
          and
          > Rangers. I hate the Red Sox, Angels and Maple Leafs and wish Kerry
          were
          > president. I despised Prime Minister Mulroney and loved Prime
          Minister
          > Trudeau. I cheer for all things Canadian--except the Maple Leafs.
          >
          > Kirby seems to be a fan of Bush, but no one else who posts here
          admits
          > to that. Poltics becomes more serious when there's a war involved,
          be
          > it Korea or Vietnam or Iraq. Nevertheless art and poetry and music
          are
          > not as temporary, and represent a better escape than Monday Night
          > Football. Moaning about politics just makes me sad. Bush will be
          with
          > us another three years. There's little I can do about it.
          >
        • Kirby Olson
          One thing about sports I ve noticed is that I don t like football because you can t see the faces. I like to see the emotions. And I like to follow
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 6, 2005
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            One thing about sports I've noticed is that I don't like football because
            you can't see the faces. I like to see the emotions. And I like to follow
            personalities. I need to see the same teams over and over, as in the NBA.
            I like to see the emotions.

            Baseball and hockey are out because with baseball the camera is too far away
            a lot of the time, and with hockey the helmets again.

            I used to like boxing until I read that the refs are covered in the boxers'
            saliva by the end of the match. Every good punch knocks all the saliva out
            of the boxer's mouth and it lands on the ref. It was too disgusting.

            I sometimes get slimed like that. I remember watching the show about the
            Nanny named Fran and she got poison ivy and then I could never watch the
            show without feeling itchy.

            I think this is what also drove me out of the left. I kept getting slimed
            by angry feminists. As I think about it, and think about my vast secret
            group of five or six of us who left the left, it is because we got slimed by
            angry feminists. I think this 4 percent difference between Republican and
            Democrat is made up of men who couldn't take the angry women of the left any
            longer.

            In Seattle there were so many! And then they started to think -- thanks to
            lesbian psychiatrists -- that they had been abused as infants. Who on earth
            would abuse an infant? It's so weird. But these feminists swallowed it,
            confronted their parents, some of whom committed suicide they were so upset
            by the bizarre accusations. Years later, some of these feminists now feel
            that their charges were bogus -- implanted by the shrinks -- and so on.

            I think that for the lesbian separatists this was just football and it meant
            a few points of yardage.

            But in the long run, and I mean very long, I think only the muddling middle
            matters and that the extremists of any kind disappear just as extremes
            disappear in nature.

            So of the left or right I'm with people like Lieberman.

            And I'm with the Jews. They have a sense of humor. I'm against the Islamic
            terrorists for the same reason. They are killing children who try to learn
            to read. I can't understand why people have any sympathy for such psychos.
            It seems many of my postmodernist friends actually prefer the Palestinians
            even though they themselves are Jews. Well, I prefer the Jews even if I am
            a Lutheran. The Jewish faith is qualitatively superior, plus they have
            sensibly installed swimming pools throughout their desert country. Hooray
            for the Jews!

            -- Kirby
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