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Dido Goodbye

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  • mandreox
    I m not sure whether I can or should defend the classics. I love them, of course, but I don t have a cell phone and threw out my TV long ago. I don t tend to
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 5, 2007
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      I'm not sure whether I can or should defend the classics. I love
      them, of course, but I don't have a cell phone and threw out my TV
      long ago. I don't tend to buy new books. For one thing, I have no room
      for more books. So, like a certain sad alcoholic uncle who died
      alone, I tend to take five books from the library and read two or
      three right to the end.

      I took Anthony Everitt's Augustus from the New York Public Library. As
      I started to read, I thought that the book was printed in two colors;
      the maps and pages were adorned with careful purple handwriting. No,
      these were corrections by a previous reader. Nor was the previous
      reader thorough. I discovered new mistakes on every page. How could
      Random House do such a piss-poor job publishing?

      Sadly, I know only too well. The late Richard Morris was a dear friend
      and when he began publishing popular science books, I'd try to read
      them. Frequently I would give up after forty or fifty pages, because,
      I thought, science was beyond me. Then one day it flashed -- the
      computer "spell check" had corrected an "error" with the wrong word,
      reducing pages and pages to nonsense. Richard's books are 2% gibberish.

      What labor classical scholars have expended over the centuries getting
      their texts correct! Perhaps I love to read the Aeneid or The Iliad
      with my little Latin and Greek because I feel the immensity of human
      attention, intelligence and love which have been expended to preserve
      these books.

      I never published an issue of my magazine Unmuzzled OX without
      typographical errors. Proofreading in 1971 was always done in pairs.
      Jack Unterecker, my advisor at Columbia, taught me the routine. The
      walls of Jack's apartment were covered with bookcases. He was a
      joyful man, but the times, I think, really wrecked his life. His wife
      came out as a Lesbian, Farrar-Strauss mangled his biography of Hart
      Crane, and the 1968 student uprising at Columbia culminated, for Jack,
      with the first of a series of heart attacks which eventually killed him.

      You can't read another person's life with certitude. Carolyn Heilbrun
      was known at Columbia at the time for tying feminism and
      literature--or so Lyndall Gordon told me. I passed on Heilbrun's
      courses, but read mysteries she wrote under the pen name Amanda
      Cross. One day I came across her email address and wrote her a fan
      letter. To my surprise, she responded, and we began a regular
      correspondence. At one point I lamented that after Jack's death
      Columbia held no memorial. This contrasted with the reaction after
      Kenneth Koch's death. Carolyn responded with the only email which
      seemed like inappropriate feminist boilerplate, viz., Jack was a
      victim of the old boys' network. The truth, as I'm sure she knew, was
      rather the opposite.

      I went on a lengthy trip and the emails ceased. I learned that while I
      traveled Heilbrun had committed suicide. She had been sick, someone
      told me; but then a note appeared in The Times in which her son said,
      no, his mother had been in perfect health.

      At this point in this posting I might be expected to wrap these words
      up by quoting, say, Virgil's rendering of the suicide of Dido. After
      the artist Ray Johnson committed suicide by drowning himself in Sag
      Harbor, I bought Emile Durkheim's classic Suicide to try to figure out
      why. There are people who believe there's nothing to add to Durkheim's
      book. Durkheim was a 19th century French sociologist. August Comte,
      who is credited with the invention of sociology, attempted suicide as
      a young man by throwing himself in the Seine. Unlike Ray, Comte was
      saved. If Comte had succeeded at killing himself, we'd never know why,
      by this reckoning, because his student wouldn't have written the final
      word on that grimmest subject, Suicide. Comte's death would just be
      incomprehensible.
    • Mick Stephens
      As a friend--she is an editor--said to me this morning: Editors don t do the best they are capable of. They do the best they can in the limited time they have
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 5, 2007
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        As a friend--she is an editor--said to me this morning: "Editors don't do the best they are capable of. They do the best they can in the limited time they have to do it." Thus, more and more, editors have less and less time to edit their manuscripts, and so we read countless books that are poorly edited and filled with typos. Even in the best of newspapers--the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, and the Guardian, for example--there are typos on Page One. When I used to write journalism, a typo on Page One was considered a treasonable act for which you would get shit-canned. Nowadays it is a daily occurrence, and no one suffers consequences for such egregious acts. This is no reason for any of us to give up our own standards. Perhaps we are the last chance saloons for writing, literature, editing, and reading. Sign me up. I volunteer for this impossible mission...

        M. G. Stephens
        (Doctor Mick)


        mandreox <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
        I'm not sure whether I can or should defend the classics. I love
        them, of course, but I don't have a cell phone and threw out my TV
        long ago. I don't tend to buy new books. For one thing, I have no room
        for more books. So, like a certain sad alcoholic uncle who died
        alone, I tend to take five books from the library and read two or
        three right to the end.

        I took Anthony Everitt's Augustus from the New York Public Library. As
        I started to read, I thought that the book was printed in two colors;
        the maps and pages were adorned with careful purple handwriting. No,
        these were corrections by a previous reader. Nor was the previous
        reader thorough. I discovered new mistakes on every page. How could
        Random House do such a piss-poor job publishing?

        Sadly, I know only too well. The late Richard Morris was a dear friend
        and when he began publishing popular science books, I'd try to read
        them. Frequently I would give up after forty or fifty pages, because,
        I thought, science was beyond me. Then one day it flashed -- the
        computer "spell check" had corrected an "error" with the wrong word,
        reducing pages and pages to nonsense. Richard's books are 2% gibberish.

        What labor classical scholars have expended over the centuries getting
        their texts correct! Perhaps I love to read the Aeneid or The Iliad
        with my little Latin and Greek because I feel the immensity of human
        attention, intelligence and love which have been expended to preserve
        these books.

        I never published an issue of my magazine Unmuzzled OX without
        typographical errors. Proofreading in 1971 was always done in pairs.
        Jack Unterecker, my advisor at Columbia, taught me the routine. The
        walls of Jack's apartment were covered with bookcases. He was a
        joyful man, but the times, I think, really wrecked his life. His wife
        came out as a Lesbian, Farrar-Strauss mangled his biography of Hart
        Crane, and the 1968 student uprising at Columbia culminated, for Jack,
        with the first of a series of heart attacks which eventually killed him.

        You can't read another person's life with certitude. Carolyn Heilbrun
        was known at Columbia at the time for tying feminism and
        literature--or so Lyndall Gordon told me. I passed on Heilbrun's
        courses, but read mysteries she wrote under the pen name Amanda
        Cross. One day I came across her email address and wrote her a fan
        letter. To my surprise, she responded, and we began a regular
        correspondence. At one point I lamented that after Jack's death
        Columbia held no memorial. This contrasted with the reaction after
        Kenneth Koch's death. Carolyn responded with the only email which
        seemed like inappropriate feminist boilerplate, viz., Jack was a
        victim of the old boys' network. The truth, as I'm sure she knew, was
        rather the opposite.

        I went on a lengthy trip and the emails ceased. I learned that while I
        traveled Heilbrun had committed suicide. She had been sick, someone
        told me; but then a note appeared in The Times in which her son said,
        no, his mother had been in perfect health.

        At this point in this posting I might be expected to wrap these words
        up by quoting, say, Virgil's rendering of the suicide of Dido. After
        the artist Ray Johnson committed suicide by drowning himself in Sag
        Harbor, I bought Emile Durkheim's classic Suicide to try to figure out
        why. There are people who believe there's nothing to add to Durkheim's
        book. Durkheim was a 19th century French sociologist. August Comte,
        who is credited with the invention of sociology, attempted suicide as
        a young man by throwing himself in the Seine. Unlike Ray, Comte was
        saved. If Comte had succeeded at killing himself, we'd never know why,
        by this reckoning, because his student wouldn't have written the final
        word on that grimmest subject, Suicide. Comte's death would just be
        incomprehensible.






        ---------------------------------
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        Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • James Beach
        DEFEND DEFEND DEFEND cause that is the tendrils of the original profession of the intellectual and the scholar, as well as the teacher (however bamboozled
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 16, 2007
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          DEFEND DEFEND DEFEND 'cause that is the tendrils of the original profession of the intellectual and the scholar, as well as the teacher (however bamboozled into thinking that it is right to teach the classics).

          Just finished the 'classic' Far From the Madding Crowd, by Hardy, and wow, did I despise the ending and his "architectually perfect plot". And the tidying up with irony, and that "of course it had to be that way" mentality; those little people, their open mouths and presumption are almost as annoying as those quasi-poetic descriptions of the changing of the seasons.
          Loved the sex, and precision, the intelligence, however-- a physician's hand, much like S. Lewis (sans 20th century bitterness and ugly-as-champion motif) and the Hawthornesque believability. Loved also the few scenes where he wrote the scene better than any cinematographer could've captured it-- a movie is all it is, really, a long one, and then (fuck her, Mitchell, stealing his Bathsheba!) it is also a time-capsule, for who knows now of many of the devices and contrivances used way back when, the hay bales and so on, the herding and shearing of sheep and all that, the omens of toads and spiders--

          YES. I gave my television away as well. Almost 2 years ago. Not that the concept is even decent in today's age-- it's blasphemy, what with NYTimes' headlines being my sole source of world events (and the occasional cutting Santa Fe headline), and YES, my landlord loaned me his TV and DVD player, and it's sitting on my floor and it plays porno--

          My PC also plays films but they're harder to see due to the flatscreen's position since a party, as you can imagine, calls for at least 2 screens...

          I TRIED READING portrait of the artist as a young man & GUESS WHAT< JOYCE SEEMS SCHIZO UNTIL THE PRESENTATION CONGEALS IN THE MIND> FREAKS THE HELL OUT OF ME> yet his greasy football is all the rage, really, even today.


          mandreox <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
          I'm not sure whether I can or should defend the classics. I love
          them, of course, but I don't have a cell phone and threw out my TV
          long ago. I don't tend to buy new books. For one thing, I have no room
          for more books. So, like a certain sad alcoholic uncle who died
          alone, I tend to take five books from the library and read two or
          three right to the end.

          I took Anthony Everitt's Augustus from the New York Public Library. As
          I started to read, I thought that the book was printed in two colors;
          the maps and pages were adorned with careful purple handwriting. No,
          these were corrections by a previous reader. Nor was the previous
          reader thorough. I discovered new mistakes on every page. How could
          Random House do such a piss-poor job publishing?

          Sadly, I know only too well. The late Richard Morris was a dear friend
          and when he began publishing popular science books, I'd try to read
          them. Frequently I would give up after forty or fifty pages, because,
          I thought, science was beyond me. Then one day it flashed -- the
          computer "spell check" had corrected an "error" with the wrong word,
          reducing pages and pages to nonsense. Richard's books are 2% gibberish.

          What labor classical scholars have expended over the centuries getting
          their texts correct! Perhaps I love to read the Aeneid or The Iliad
          with my little Latin and Greek because I feel the immensity of human
          attention, intelligence and love which have been expended to preserve
          these books.

          I never published an issue of my magazine Unmuzzled OX without
          typographical errors. Proofreading in 1971 was always done in pairs.
          Jack Unterecker, my advisor at Columbia, taught me the routine. The
          walls of Jack's apartment were covered with bookcases. He was a
          joyful man, but the times, I think, really wrecked his life. His wife
          came out as a Lesbian, Farrar-Strauss mangled his biography of Hart
          Crane, and the 1968 student uprising at Columbia culminated, for Jack,
          with the first of a series of heart attacks which eventually killed him.

          You can't read another person's life with certitude. Carolyn Heilbrun
          was known at Columbia at the time for tying feminism and
          literature--or so Lyndall Gordon told me. I passed on Heilbrun's
          courses, but read mysteries she wrote under the pen name Amanda
          Cross. One day I came across her email address and wrote her a fan
          letter. To my surprise, she responded, and we began a regular
          correspondence. At one point I lamented that after Jack's death
          Columbia held no memorial. This contrasted with the reaction after
          Kenneth Koch's death. Carolyn responded with the only email which
          seemed like inappropriate feminist boilerplate, viz., Jack was a
          victim of the old boys' network. The truth, as I'm sure she knew, was
          rather the opposite.

          I went on a lengthy trip and the emails ceased. I learned that while I
          traveled Heilbrun had committed suicide. She had been sick, someone
          told me; but then a note appeared in The Times in which her son said,
          no, his mother had been in perfect health.

          At this point in this posting I might be expected to wrap these words
          up by quoting, say, Virgil's rendering of the suicide of Dido. After
          the artist Ray Johnson committed suicide by drowning himself in Sag
          Harbor, I bought Emile Durkheim's classic Suicide to try to figure out
          why. There are people who believe there's nothing to add to Durkheim's
          book. Durkheim was a 19th century French sociologist. August Comte,
          who is credited with the invention of sociology, attempted suicide as
          a young man by throwing himself in the Seine. Unlike Ray, Comte was
          saved. If Comte had succeeded at killing himself, we'd never know why,
          by this reckoning, because his student wouldn't have written the final
          word on that grimmest subject, Suicide. Comte's death would just be
          incomprehensible.






          ---------------------------------
          Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel today!

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • James Beach
          I met a man recently who said he enjoyed finding the daily typos in the NYT; I guess it gave him something to live for. As an editor, I am prone to
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 23, 2007
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            I met a man recently who said he enjoyed finding the daily typos in the NYT; I guess it gave him something to live for. As an editor, I am prone to perfectionism and so also glean a bit of superiority of the inanimate when my eye picks up what others in my field have obviously or perhaps failed to notice. Yet the content of any written piece is is far more important than the micro arrangement of letters and symbols. I think most of us allow for the occasional verbal stammers and mis-starts, slip-ups and pronounication-fumbles in speech and the same applies to literature/magazine fluff/news/et alii.

            While working on "ANTICS" (Berge) I created an editorial style sheet unlike any other to try and coalesce/unify what was at times a motley crew of poetic conveyances. This led to several full-book sweeps, and yet there are still circlable errors in it (as well as iffy ones which need to be viewed in the right light to ensure justification for existence-- the '60s were a doozy for conservatives and liberals alike!). Some of the "mistakes" can be blamed on bugs of one sort or another which entered the computer systems and software and data of Regent Press. This first edition of 500 is immediately a collector's item, and I expect (gods willing) that another run will afford me the opportunity to do another sweep to rid the text of any lingering detritus so as to afford the greatest luxury for the reader.

            Of course, as any college prof might tell you, would-be errors are often intentional and mired in the roots of words and symantics of language, to bring about a certain reaction in the reader... but you already know all that, being erudite and online seekers and bloggers too. Such is the stuff of lit?

            In color

            Mick Stephens <mickstphns@...> wrote:
            As a friend--she is an editor--said to me this morning: "Editors don't do the best they are capable of. They do the best they can in the limited time they have to do it." Thus, more and more, editors have less and less time to edit their manuscripts, and so we read countless books that are poorly edited and filled with typos. Even in the best of newspapers--the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, and the Guardian, for example--there are typos on Page One. When I used to write journalism, a typo on Page One was considered a treasonable act for which you would get shit-canned. Nowadays it is a daily occurrence, and no one suffers consequences for such egregious acts. This is no reason for any of us to give up our own standards. Perhaps we are the last chance saloons for writing, literature, editing, and reading. Sign me up. I volunteer for this impossible mission...

            M. G. Stephens
            (Doctor Mick)


            mandreox <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
            I'm not sure whether I can or should defend the classics. I love
            them, of course, but I don't have a cell phone and threw out my TV
            long ago. I don't tend to buy new books. For one thing, I have no room
            for more books. So, like a certain sad alcoholic uncle who died
            alone, I tend to take five books from the library and read two or
            three right to the end.

            I took Anthony Everitt's Augustus from the New York Public Library. As
            I started to read, I thought that the book was printed in two colors;
            the maps and pages were adorned with careful purple handwriting. No,
            these were corrections by a previous reader. Nor was the previous
            reader thorough. I discovered new mistakes on every page. How could
            Random House do such a piss-poor job publishing?

            Sadly, I know only too well. The late Richard Morris was a dear friend
            and when he began publishing popular science books, I'd try to read
            them. Frequently I would give up after forty or fifty pages, because,
            I thought, science was beyond me. Then one day it flashed -- the
            computer "spell check" had corrected an "error" with the wrong word,
            reducing pages and pages to nonsense. Richard's books are 2% gibberish.

            What labor classical scholars have expended over the centuries getting
            their texts correct! Perhaps I love to read the Aeneid or The Iliad
            with my little Latin and Greek because I feel the immensity of human
            attention, intelligence and love which have been expended to preserve
            these books.

            I never published an issue of my magazine Unmuzzled OX without
            typographical errors. Proofreading in 1971 was always done in pairs.
            Jack Unterecker, my advisor at Columbia, taught me the routine. The
            walls of Jack's apartment were covered with bookcases. He was a
            joyful man, but the times, I think, really wrecked his life. His wife
            came out as a Lesbian, Farrar-Strauss mangled his biography of Hart
            Crane, and the 1968 student uprising at Columbia culminated, for Jack,
            with the first of a series of heart attacks which eventually killed him.

            You can't read another person's life with certitude. Carolyn Heilbrun
            was known at Columbia at the time for tying feminism and
            literature--or so Lyndall Gordon told me. I passed on Heilbrun's
            courses, but read mysteries she wrote under the pen name Amanda
            Cross. One day I came across her email address and wrote her a fan
            letter. To my surprise, she responded, and we began a regular
            correspondence. At one point I lamented that after Jack's death
            Columbia held no memorial. This contrasted with the reaction after
            Kenneth Koch's death. Carolyn responded with the only email which
            seemed like inappropriate feminist boilerplate, viz., Jack was a
            victim of the old boys' network. The truth, as I'm sure she knew, was
            rather the opposite.

            I went on a lengthy trip and the emails ceased. I learned that while I
            traveled Heilbrun had committed suicide. She had been sick, someone
            told me; but then a note appeared in The Times in which her son said,
            no, his mother had been in perfect health.

            At this point in this posting I might be expected to wrap these words
            up by quoting, say, Virgil's rendering of the suicide of Dido. After
            the artist Ray Johnson committed suicide by drowning himself in Sag
            Harbor, I bought Emile Durkheim's classic Suicide to try to figure out
            why. There are people who believe there's nothing to add to Durkheim's
            book. Durkheim was a 19th century French sociologist. August Comte,
            who is credited with the invention of sociology, attempted suicide as
            a young man by throwing himself in the Seine. Unlike Ray, Comte was
            saved. If Comte had succeeded at killing himself, we'd never know why,
            by this reckoning, because his student wouldn't have written the final
            word on that grimmest subject, Suicide. Comte's death would just be
            incomprehensible.

            ---------------------------------
            Be a better Heartthrob. Get better relationship answers from someone who knows.
            Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            ---------------------------------
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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jeff Wright
            [symantic] sic I what mean know you ... === message truncated === ____________________________________________________________________________________ Take the
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 24, 2007
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              [symantic] sic
              I what mean know you


              --- James Beach <bergecafe2007@...> wrote:

              > I met a man recently who said he enjoyed finding the
              > daily typos in the NYT; I guess it gave him
              > something to live for. As an editor, I am prone to
              > perfectionism and so also glean a bit of superiority
              > of the inanimate when my eye picks up what others in
              > my field have obviously or perhaps failed to notice.
              > Yet the content of any written piece is is far more
              > important than the micro arrangement of letters and
              > symbols. I think most of us allow for the occasional
              > verbal stammers and mis-starts, slip-ups and
              > pronounication-fumbles in speech and the same
              > applies to literature/magazine fluff/news/et alii.
              >
              > While working on "ANTICS" (Berge) I created an
              > editorial style sheet unlike any other to try and
              > coalesce/unify what was at times a motley crew of
              > poetic conveyances. This led to several full-book
              > sweeps, and yet there are still circlable errors in
              > it (as well as iffy ones which need to be viewed in
              > the right light to ensure justification for
              > existence-- the '60s were a doozy for conservatives
              > and liberals alike!). Some of the "mistakes" can be
              > blamed on bugs of one sort or another which entered
              > the computer systems and software and data of Regent
              > Press. This first edition of 500 is immediately a
              > collector's item, and I expect (gods willing) that
              > another run will afford me the opportunity to do
              > another sweep to rid the text of any lingering
              > detritus so as to afford the greatest luxury for the
              > reader.
              >
              > Of course, as any college prof might tell you,
              > would-be errors are often intentional and mired in
              > the roots of words and symantics of language, to
              > bring about a certain reaction in the reader... but
              > you already know all that, being erudite and online
              > seekers and bloggers too. Such is the stuff of lit?
              >
              > In color
              >
              > Mick Stephens <mickstphns@...> wrote:
              > As a friend--she is an editor--said to me
              > this morning: "Editors don't do the best they are
              > capable of. They do the best they can in the limited
              > time they have to do it." Thus, more and more,
              > editors have less and less time to edit their
              > manuscripts, and so we read countless books that are
              > poorly edited and filled with typos. Even in the
              > best of newspapers--the New York Times, the
              > International Herald Tribune, and the Guardian, for
              > example--there are typos on Page One. When I used to
              > write journalism, a typo on Page One was considered
              > a treasonable act for which you would get
              > shit-canned. Nowadays it is a daily occurrence, and
              > no one suffers consequences for such egregious acts.
              > This is no reason for any of us to give up our own
              > standards. Perhaps we are the last chance saloons
              > for writing, literature, editing, and reading. Sign
              > me up. I volunteer for this impossible mission...
              >
              > M. G. Stephens
              > (Doctor Mick)
              >
              >
              > mandreox <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
              > I'm not sure whether I can or should defend the
              > classics. I love
              > them, of course, but I don't have a cell phone and
              > threw out my TV
              > long ago. I don't tend to buy new books. For one
              > thing, I have no room
              > for more books. So, like a certain sad alcoholic
              > uncle who died
              > alone, I tend to take five books from the library
              > and read two or
              > three right to the end.
              >
              > I took Anthony Everitt's Augustus from the New York
              > Public Library. As
              > I started to read, I thought that the book was
              > printed in two colors;
              > the maps and pages were adorned with careful purple
              > handwriting. No,
              > these were corrections by a previous reader. Nor was
              > the previous
              > reader thorough. I discovered new mistakes on every
              > page. How could
              > Random House do such a piss-poor job publishing?
              >
              > Sadly, I know only too well. The late Richard Morris
              > was a dear friend
              > and when he began publishing popular science books,
              > I'd try to read
              > them. Frequently I would give up after forty or
              > fifty pages, because,
              > I thought, science was beyond me. Then one day it
              > flashed -- the
              > computer "spell check" had corrected an "error" with
              > the wrong word,
              > reducing pages and pages to nonsense. Richard's
              > books are 2% gibberish.
              >
              > What labor classical scholars have expended over the
              > centuries getting
              > their texts correct! Perhaps I love to read the
              > Aeneid or The Iliad
              > with my little Latin and Greek because I feel the
              > immensity of human
              > attention, intelligence and love which have been
              > expended to preserve
              > these books.
              >
              > I never published an issue of my magazine Unmuzzled
              > OX without
              > typographical errors. Proofreading in 1971 was
              > always done in pairs.
              > Jack Unterecker, my advisor at Columbia, taught me
              > the routine. The
              > walls of Jack's apartment were covered with
              > bookcases. He was a
              > joyful man, but the times, I think, really wrecked
              > his life. His wife
              > came out as a Lesbian, Farrar-Strauss mangled his
              > biography of Hart
              > Crane, and the 1968 student uprising at Columbia
              > culminated, for Jack,
              > with the first of a series of heart attacks which
              > eventually killed him.
              >
              > You can't read another person's life with certitude.
              > Carolyn Heilbrun
              > was known at Columbia at the time for tying feminism
              > and
              > literature--or so Lyndall Gordon told me. I passed
              > on Heilbrun's
              > courses, but read mysteries she wrote under the pen
              > name Amanda
              > Cross. One day I came across her email address and
              > wrote her a fan
              > letter. To my surprise, she responded, and we began
              > a regular
              > correspondence. At one point I lamented that after
              > Jack's death
              > Columbia held no memorial. This contrasted with the
              > reaction after
              > Kenneth Koch's death. Carolyn responded with the
              > only email which
              > seemed like inappropriate feminist boilerplate,
              > viz., Jack was a
              > victim of the old boys' network. The truth, as I'm
              > sure she knew, was
              > rather the opposite.
              >
              > I went on a lengthy trip and the emails ceased. I
              > learned that while I
              > traveled Heilbrun had committed suicide. She had
              > been sick, someone
              > told me; but then a note appeared in The Times in
              > which her son said,
              > no, his mother had been in perfect health.
              >
              > At this point in this posting I might be expected to
              > wrap these words
              > up by quoting, say, Virgil's rendering of the
              > suicide of Dido. After
              > the artist Ray Johnson committed suicide by drowning
              > himself in Sag
              > Harbor, I bought Emile Durkheim's classic Suicide to
              > try to figure out
              > why. There are people who believe there's nothing to
              > add to Durkheim's
              > book. Durkheim was a 19th century French
              > sociologist. August Comte,
              > who is credited with the invention of sociology,
              > attempted suicide as
              > a young man by throwing himself in the Seine. Unlike
              > Ray, Comte was
              > saved. If Comte had succeeded at killing himself,
              > we'd never know why,
              > by this reckoning, because his student wouldn't have
              > written the final
              > word on that grimmest subject, Suicide. Comte's
              > death would just be
              > incomprehensible.
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > Be a better Heartthrob. Get better relationship
              > answers from someone who knows.
              > Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
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              > hotels with Yahoo! FareChase.
              >
              === message truncated ===




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            • mandreox
              I spend one hour every day hating George Bush. I try to limit myself to an hour. That way I have time to read. Among the books I am currently reading, Inside
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 26, 2007
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                I spend one hour every day hating George Bush. I try to limit myself
                to an hour. That way I have time to read.

                Among the books I am currently reading, Inside Islam has the most
                typos. It is an anthology of excerpts from the "classics" of current
                commentary on Islam. The contributors, as Tom Clark might might say,
                are All-Stars: Bernard Lewis, Karen Armstrong, Ryszard Kapucscinski,
                William T. Vollmann, V.S. Naipaul, etc. The book appeared in 2002 and
                was obviously a quickie response to 9/11. The mind allows for this
                haste and easily corrects the typos.


                --- In unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Wright <covermag@...> wrote:
                >
                > [symantic] sic
                > I what mean know you
                >
                >
                > --- James Beach <bergecafe2007@...> wrote:
                >
                > > I met a man recently who said he enjoyed finding the
                > > daily typos in the NYT; I guess it gave him
                > > something to live for. As an editor, I am prone to
                > > perfectionism and so also glean a bit of superiority
                > > of the inanimate when my eye picks up what others in
                > > my field have obviously or perhaps failed to notice.
                > > Yet the content of any written piece is is far more
                > > important than the micro arrangement of letters and
                > > symbols. I think most of us allow for the occasional
                > > verbal stammers and mis-starts, slip-ups and
                > > pronounication-fumbles in speech and the same
                > > applies to literature/magazine fluff/news/et alii.
                > >
                > > While working on "ANTICS" (Berge) I created an
                > > editorial style sheet unlike any other to try and
                > > coalesce/unify what was at times a motley crew of
                > > poetic conveyances. This led to several full-book
                > > sweeps, and yet there are still circlable errors in
                > > it (as well as iffy ones which need to be viewed in
                > > the right light to ensure justification for
                > > existence-- the '60s were a doozy for conservatives
                > > and liberals alike!). Some of the "mistakes" can be
                > > blamed on bugs of one sort or another which entered
                > > the computer systems and software and data of Regent
                > > Press. This first edition of 500 is immediately a
                > > collector's item, and I expect (gods willing) that
                > > another run will afford me the opportunity to do
                > > another sweep to rid the text of any lingering
                > > detritus so as to afford the greatest luxury for the
                > > reader.
                > >
                > > Of course, as any college prof might tell you,
                > > would-be errors are often intentional and mired in
                > > the roots of words and symantics of language, to
                > > bring about a certain reaction in the reader... but
                > > you already know all that, being erudite and online
                > > seekers and bloggers too. Such is the stuff of lit?
                > >
                > > In color
                > >
                > > Mick Stephens <mickstphns@...> wrote:
                > > As a friend--she is an editor--said to me
                > > this morning: "Editors don't do the best they are
                > > capable of. They do the best they can in the limited
                > > time they have to do it." Thus, more and more,
                > > editors have less and less time to edit their
                > > manuscripts, and so we read countless books that are
                > > poorly edited and filled with typos. Even in the
                > > best of newspapers--the New York Times, the
                > > International Herald Tribune, and the Guardian, for
                > > example--there are typos on Page One. When I used to
                > > write journalism, a typo on Page One was considered
                > > a treasonable act for which you would get
                > > shit-canned. Nowadays it is a daily occurrence, and
                > > no one suffers consequences for such egregious acts.
                > > This is no reason for any of us to give up our own
                > > standards. Perhaps we are the last chance saloons
                > > for writing, literature, editing, and reading. Sign
                > > me up. I volunteer for this impossible mission...
                > >
                > > M. G. Stephens
                > > (Doctor Mick)
                > >
                > >
                > > mandreox <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                > > I'm not sure whether I can or should defend the
                > > classics. I love
                > > them, of course, but I don't have a cell phone and
                > > threw out my TV
                > > long ago. I don't tend to buy new books. For one
                > > thing, I have no room
                > > for more books. So, like a certain sad alcoholic
                > > uncle who died
                > > alone, I tend to take five books from the library
                > > and read two or
                > > three right to the end.
                > >
                > > I took Anthony Everitt's Augustus from the New York
                > > Public Library. As
                > > I started to read, I thought that the book was
                > > printed in two colors;
                > > the maps and pages were adorned with careful purple
                > > handwriting. No,
                > > these were corrections by a previous reader. Nor was
                > > the previous
                > > reader thorough. I discovered new mistakes on every
                > > page. How could
                > > Random House do such a piss-poor job publishing?
                > >
                > > Sadly, I know only too well. The late Richard Morris
                > > was a dear friend
                > > and when he began publishing popular science books,
                > > I'd try to read
                > > them. Frequently I would give up after forty or
                > > fifty pages, because,
                > > I thought, science was beyond me. Then one day it
                > > flashed -- the
                > > computer "spell check" had corrected an "error" with
                > > the wrong word,
                > > reducing pages and pages to nonsense. Richard's
                > > books are 2% gibberish.
                > >
                > > What labor classical scholars have expended over the
                > > centuries getting
                > > their texts correct! Perhaps I love to read the
                > > Aeneid or The Iliad
                > > with my little Latin and Greek because I feel the
                > > immensity of human
                > > attention, intelligence and love which have been
                > > expended to preserve
                > > these books.
                > >
                > > I never published an issue of my magazine Unmuzzled
                > > OX without
                > > typographical errors. Proofreading in 1971 was
                > > always done in pairs.
                > > Jack Unterecker, my advisor at Columbia, taught me
                > > the routine. The
                > > walls of Jack's apartment were covered with
                > > bookcases. He was a
                > > joyful man, but the times, I think, really wrecked
                > > his life. His wife
                > > came out as a Lesbian, Farrar-Strauss mangled his
                > > biography of Hart
                > > Crane, and the 1968 student uprising at Columbia
                > > culminated, for Jack,
                > > with the first of a series of heart attacks which
                > > eventually killed him.
                > >
                > > You can't read another person's life with certitude.
                > > Carolyn Heilbrun
                > > was known at Columbia at the time for tying feminism
                > > and
                > > literature--or so Lyndall Gordon told me. I passed
                > > on Heilbrun's
                > > courses, but read mysteries she wrote under the pen
                > > name Amanda
                > > Cross. One day I came across her email address and
                > > wrote her a fan
                > > letter. To my surprise, she responded, and we began
                > > a regular
                > > correspondence. At one point I lamented that after
                > > Jack's death
                > > Columbia held no memorial. This contrasted with the
                > > reaction after
                > > Kenneth Koch's death. Carolyn responded with the
                > > only email which
                > > seemed like inappropriate feminist boilerplate,
                > > viz., Jack was a
                > > victim of the old boys' network. The truth, as I'm
                > > sure she knew, was
                > > rather the opposite.
                > >
                > > I went on a lengthy trip and the emails ceased. I
                > > learned that while I
                > > traveled Heilbrun had committed suicide. She had
                > > been sick, someone
                > > told me; but then a note appeared in The Times in
                > > which her son said,
                > > no, his mother had been in perfect health.
                > >
                > > At this point in this posting I might be expected to
                > > wrap these words
                > > up by quoting, say, Virgil's rendering of the
                > > suicide of Dido. After
                > > the artist Ray Johnson committed suicide by drowning
                > > himself in Sag
                > > Harbor, I bought Emile Durkheim's classic Suicide to
                > > try to figure out
                > > why. There are people who believe there's nothing to
                > > add to Durkheim's
                > > book. Durkheim was a 19th century French
                > > sociologist. August Comte,
                > > who is credited with the invention of sociology,
                > > attempted suicide as
                > > a young man by throwing himself in the Seine. Unlike
                > > Ray, Comte was
                > > saved. If Comte had succeeded at killing himself,
                > > we'd never know why,
                > > by this reckoning, because his student wouldn't have
                > > written the final
                > > word on that grimmest subject, Suicide. Comte's
                > > death would just be
                > > incomprehensible.
                > >
                > > ---------------------------------
                > > Be a better Heartthrob. Get better relationship
                > > answers from someone who knows.
                > > Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                > > removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ---------------------------------
                > > Looking for a deal? Find great prices on flights and
                > > hotels with Yahoo! FareChase.
                > >
                > === message truncated ===
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
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              • James Beach
                On the radio recently: after Steve Miller Band s Fly Like an Eagle --time keeps on slipping slipping slippin into the future-- (no blending of tails and
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 5, 2007
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                  On the radio recently: after Steve Miller Band's "Fly Like an Eagle"--time keeps on slipping slipping slippin' into the future-- (no blending of tails and heads of songs, no commerical break) was one by the Beatles. I recalled the pairing put forth in a section of Michael Andre's memoirish offering "Mirror"; I liked the piece, and it stuck, and it came back to me via radio.

                  So it appears I might've been incorrect in my light criticism concerning Andre's choice to juxtapose the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band's birthday with lyrics from (what I consider the lesser) Steve Miller Band in the otherwise fetching "Mirror". New pleasure in knowing that some body or some entity-- other than the author-- believes that the two bands can be successfully paired in the ear.

                  Whether it was an automated computer playlist or a deejay's idea of a good mix is moot, and we could discuss a god or gods working through people and through machines, except that's off topic. Either way, any way, it's for sure a validation of what we can accomplish by becoming more aware of the powers of individual and collective energy.

                  [BTW the subject line above is song lyrics by The Shamen, not original I'm sure, but they're on topic.]

                  [The Beatles song, BTW, was "Back in the USSR"; I sought out the lyrics to it and saw once again that God's Plan<and this is generic reference to the laws of the universe and what humankind does to them> is beyond my reasoning and/or logic and/or emotive abilites. As it should be for an agnostic. Let me know if any one of you can shed a little light...]



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                • James Beach
                  On the radio recently: after Steve Miller Band s Fly Like an Eagle --time keeps on slipping slipping slippin into the future-- (no blending of tails and
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 5, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    On the radio recently: after Steve Miller Band's "Fly Like an Eagle"--time keeps on slipping slipping slippin' into the future-- (no blending of tails and heads of songs, no commerical break) was one by the Beatles. I recalled the pairing put forth in a section of Michael Andre's memoirish offering "Mirror"; I liked the piece, and it stuck, and it came back to me via radio.

                    So it appears I might've been incorrect in my light criticism concerning Andre's choice to juxtapose the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band's birthday with lyrics from (what I consider the lesser) Steve Miller Band in the otherwise fetching "Mirror". New pleasure in knowing that some body or some entity-- other than the author-- believes that the two bands can be successfully paired in the ear.

                    Whether it was an automated computer playlist or a deejay's idea of a good mix is moot, and we could discuss a god or gods working through people and through machines, except that's off topic. Either way, any way, it's for sure a validation of what we can accomplish by becoming more aware of the powers of individual and collective energy.

                    [BTW the subject line above is song lyrics by The Shamen, not original I'm sure, but they're on topic.]

                    [The Beatles song, BTW, was "Back in the USSR"; I sought out the lyrics to it and saw once again that God's Plan<and this is generic reference to the laws of the universe and what humankind does to them> is beyond my reasoning and/or logic and/or emotive abilites. As it should be for an agnostic. Let me know if any one of you can shed a little light...]



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