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If you do not know Olmsted, sir, you are a heathen

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  • mandreox
    Frederick Law Olmsted saved my life four times. In the winters at McGill in Montreal I would climb Mount Royal, his park. In Chicago I d walk along the lake in
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 4, 2007
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      Frederick Law Olmsted saved my life four times. In the winters at
      McGill in Montreal I would climb Mount Royal, his park. In Chicago I'd
      walk along the lake in Hyde Park, Olmsted's scenery "improved." In New
      York feeling dismal or just too damn hot I walk in Central Park,
      Olmsted's masterpiece. Olmsted was a landscape architect avant le
      fait. Recently I have lived on Staten Island cut off from the
      vibrant communities of Manhattan until -- in a little park of improved
      nature designed by Mr O, who actually himself lived on Staten Island,
      I spotted birders! Birders are sociable nerds and anytime I want,
      thanks to Olmsted, I can now find intelligent chat.

      Olmsted is my Savior. If you do not know Olmsted, sir, you are a heathen.

      --- In unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com, ezra s abrams <ezracolbert@...> wrote:
      >
      > Middlebrow it may have been, but I loved it as a kid (cf Ford Maddox
      > Ford on Captain Marryatt)
      > To pick a point, with the general american public, I don't think
      > characterizing Olmstead as unkown is that off base..
      > but cite some polling data and prove me wrong
      >
      > mandreox wrote:
      > >
      > > American Heritage has suspended publication. It was lavish and utterly
      > > middlebrow. By coincidence I picked up a couple copies just before the
      > > suspension was announced.
      > >
      > > The one featured Walter Raleigh. The article was dumb, a
      > > recapitulation of Raleigh's Roanoke adventure; but the color plates
      > > were great. I looked up Raleigh's poetry in the Norton anthology. Then
      > > I read in the Fairie Queen; Raleigh helped get it published and
      > > Spenser's letter to Raleigh is as important to that poem as Dante's to
      > > Della Scala. And then I read some Donne in the Grierson edition;
      > > there's a new biography of Donne. Ann Donne, for whom John sacrificed
      > > all, died at 33.
      > >
      > > The other American Heritage featured Frederick Olmstead whom the
      > > magazine characterizes, laughably, as unknown. Olmstead designed the
      > > great parks of the great North American cities. The World for a
      > > Shilling by Michael Leapman credits the gigantic greenhouse which was
      > > essentially London's Great Exhibition of 1851 for foretelling
      > > Olmstead. The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson details the
      > > struggle by David Burnham to engage Olmstead as designer for the
      > > grounds of Chicago's Columbian Exhibition of 1892. Olmstead alone,
      > > of course, made the great American cities bearable.
      > >
      > > Will the wonderful American Heritage Dictionaries continue? The title
      > > is owned by Forbes. I am disappointed that with age and some money I
      > > have come to read Forbes with almost the attention I pay The New
      > > Yorker. In 1988 I published in Unmuzzled OX an interview with Imamu
      > > Amiri Baraka by David Remick. I regret having made fun of Remick. Of
      > > course, he now edits The New Yorker.
      > >
      > >
      >
      > --
      > Ezra S Abrams
      > 4 Colbert Rd
      > Newton MA 02465
      >
      > cell 617 817 4211
      > home 617 527 6413
      >
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