Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

American Heritage: So Long at the Fair

Expand Messages
  • mandreox
    American Heritage has suspended publication. It was lavish and utterly middlebrow. By coincidence I picked up a couple copies just before the suspension was
    Message 1 of 3 , May 29, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      American Heritage has suspended publication. It was lavish and utterly
      middlebrow. By coincidence I picked up a couple copies just before the
      suspension was announced.

      The one featured Walter Raleigh. The article was dumb, a
      recapitulation of Raleigh's Roanoke adventure; but the color plates
      were great. I looked up Raleigh's poetry in the Norton anthology. Then
      I read in the Fairie Queen; Raleigh helped get it published and
      Spenser's letter to Raleigh is as important to that poem as Dante's to
      Della Scala. And then I read some Donne in the Grierson edition;
      there's a new biography of Donne. Ann Donne, for whom John sacrificed
      all, died at 33.

      The other American Heritage featured Frederick Olmstead whom the
      magazine characterizes, laughably, as unknown. Olmstead designed the
      great parks of the great North American cities. The World for a
      Shilling by Michael Leapman credits the gigantic greenhouse which was
      essentially London's Great Exhibition of 1851 for foretelling
      Olmstead. The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson details the
      struggle by David Burnham to engage Olmstead as designer for the
      grounds of Chicago's Columbian Exhibition of 1892. Olmstead alone,
      of course, made the great American cities bearable.

      Will the wonderful American Heritage Dictionaries continue? The title
      is owned by Forbes. I am disappointed that with age and some money I
      have come to read Forbes with almost the attention I pay The New
      Yorker. In 1988 I published in Unmuzzled OX an interview with Imamu
      Amiri Baraka by David Remick. I regret having made fun of Remick. Of
      course, he now edits The New Yorker.
    • ezra s abrams
      Middlebrow it may have been, but I loved it as a kid (cf Ford Maddox Ford on Captain Marryatt) To pick a point, with the general american public, I don t think
      Message 2 of 3 , May 30, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Middlebrow it may have been, but I loved it as a kid (cf Ford Maddox
        Ford on Captain Marryatt)
        To pick a point, with the general american public, I don't think
        characterizing Olmstead as unkown is that off base..
        but cite some polling data and prove me wrong

        mandreox wrote:
        >
        > American Heritage has suspended publication. It was lavish and utterly
        > middlebrow. By coincidence I picked up a couple copies just before the
        > suspension was announced.
        >
        > The one featured Walter Raleigh. The article was dumb, a
        > recapitulation of Raleigh's Roanoke adventure; but the color plates
        > were great. I looked up Raleigh's poetry in the Norton anthology. Then
        > I read in the Fairie Queen; Raleigh helped get it published and
        > Spenser's letter to Raleigh is as important to that poem as Dante's to
        > Della Scala. And then I read some Donne in the Grierson edition;
        > there's a new biography of Donne. Ann Donne, for whom John sacrificed
        > all, died at 33.
        >
        > The other American Heritage featured Frederick Olmstead whom the
        > magazine characterizes, laughably, as unknown. Olmstead designed the
        > great parks of the great North American cities. The World for a
        > Shilling by Michael Leapman credits the gigantic greenhouse which was
        > essentially London's Great Exhibition of 1851 for foretelling
        > Olmstead. The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson details the
        > struggle by David Burnham to engage Olmstead as designer for the
        > grounds of Chicago's Columbian Exhibition of 1892. Olmstead alone,
        > of course, made the great American cities bearable.
        >
        > Will the wonderful American Heritage Dictionaries continue? The title
        > is owned by Forbes. I am disappointed that with age and some money I
        > have come to read Forbes with almost the attention I pay The New
        > Yorker. In 1988 I published in Unmuzzled OX an interview with Imamu
        > Amiri Baraka by David Remick. I regret having made fun of Remick. Of
        > course, he now edits The New Yorker.
        >
        >

        --
        Ezra S Abrams
        4 Colbert Rd
        Newton MA 02465

        cell 617 817 4211
        home 617 527 6413
      • mandreox
        Frederick Law Olmsted saved my life four times. In the winters at McGill in Montreal I would climb Mount Royal, his park. In Chicago I d walk along the lake in
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 4, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Frederick Law Olmsted saved my life four times. In the winters at
          McGill in Montreal I would climb Mount Royal, his park. In Chicago I'd
          walk along the lake in Hyde Park, Olmsted's scenery "improved." In New
          York feeling dismal or just too damn hot I walk in Central Park,
          Olmsted's masterpiece. Olmsted was a landscape architect avant le
          fait. Recently I have lived on Staten Island cut off from the
          vibrant communities of Manhattan until -- in a little park of improved
          nature designed by Mr O, who actually himself lived on Staten Island,
          I spotted birders! Birders are sociable nerds and anytime I want,
          thanks to Olmsted, I can now find intelligent chat.

          Olmsted is my Savior. If you do not know Olmsted, sir, you are a heathen.

          --- In unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com, ezra s abrams <ezracolbert@...> wrote:
          >
          > Middlebrow it may have been, but I loved it as a kid (cf Ford Maddox
          > Ford on Captain Marryatt)
          > To pick a point, with the general american public, I don't think
          > characterizing Olmstead as unkown is that off base..
          > but cite some polling data and prove me wrong
          >
          > mandreox wrote:
          > >
          > > American Heritage has suspended publication. It was lavish and utterly
          > > middlebrow. By coincidence I picked up a couple copies just before the
          > > suspension was announced.
          > >
          > > The one featured Walter Raleigh. The article was dumb, a
          > > recapitulation of Raleigh's Roanoke adventure; but the color plates
          > > were great. I looked up Raleigh's poetry in the Norton anthology. Then
          > > I read in the Fairie Queen; Raleigh helped get it published and
          > > Spenser's letter to Raleigh is as important to that poem as Dante's to
          > > Della Scala. And then I read some Donne in the Grierson edition;
          > > there's a new biography of Donne. Ann Donne, for whom John sacrificed
          > > all, died at 33.
          > >
          > > The other American Heritage featured Frederick Olmstead whom the
          > > magazine characterizes, laughably, as unknown. Olmstead designed the
          > > great parks of the great North American cities. The World for a
          > > Shilling by Michael Leapman credits the gigantic greenhouse which was
          > > essentially London's Great Exhibition of 1851 for foretelling
          > > Olmstead. The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson details the
          > > struggle by David Burnham to engage Olmstead as designer for the
          > > grounds of Chicago's Columbian Exhibition of 1892. Olmstead alone,
          > > of course, made the great American cities bearable.
          > >
          > > Will the wonderful American Heritage Dictionaries continue? The title
          > > is owned by Forbes. I am disappointed that with age and some money I
          > > have come to read Forbes with almost the attention I pay The New
          > > Yorker. In 1988 I published in Unmuzzled OX an interview with Imamu
          > > Amiri Baraka by David Remick. I regret having made fun of Remick. Of
          > > course, he now edits The New Yorker.
          > >
          > >
          >
          > --
          > Ezra S Abrams
          > 4 Colbert Rd
          > Newton MA 02465
          >
          > cell 617 817 4211
          > home 617 527 6413
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.