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  • mandreox
    I was 8-years-old when I saw my first black child. I had seen black college students from the Commonwealth; they were studying at Queen s; but all adults
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 2, 2006
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      I was 8-years-old when I saw my first black child. I had seen black
      college students from the Commonwealth; they were studying at
      Queen's; but all "adults" were weird, so why give them a second
      thought? But one weekend my father took me to the Sportsmens Show in
      Toronto, and I was astounded to see a black child. I kept circling,
      trying not to stare.

      New York, on the other hand, is all about race. When Fly was here I
      tried to get her to take me to one of TriBeCa's Vietnamese
      restaurants, but she thought that would be really too boring. My
      landlady on Staten Island is black, but she was born in Aruba. When I
      finally met her mother, I could at last place her wonderful accent.
      It's Dutch via the Islands plus Brooklyn.

      I don't wish to imply for a second that New York is a model of racial
      harmony. I prefer to observe clashes between females of our species,
      since they don't usually degenerate into violence. I suspect most
      Americans have encountered that new stereotype, the Chippy or
      Officious Black Woman. One Thanksgiving, my cousin and I were on our
      way to dinner at my uncle's in New Jersey. The train disgorged about
      300 white folks. At the top of the stairs, there was one Chippy
      Officious Black Woman. "People, people," she explained, "there's room
      for all." She then indicated that the white folks should take the
      right stairs and she would descend alone down the left stairs. Ahead
      of me was young woman with purple hair, a gossamer top and a Goth's
      worth of earrings. When Ms Goth was opposite Ms Officious, she
      addressed her with two words: "Ghetto trash."

      --- In unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com, long_legged_fly <no_reply@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I don't usually bother talking about such things, but...
      >
      > I was running for the bus the other day when I heard someone
      say, "run, you bitch". I
      > wondered if this was being said by someone who was singing along to
      a song, someone who
      > was talking to herself, or someone who was talking to me. I turned
      around and asked, "are
      > you talking to me?". The girl was maybe 16 and wearing a backpack.
      She hesitated, as if
      > surprised by the fact that I was addressing her, and then
      said, "yes, you don't belong here --
      > go back to where you came from", or something to that effect (I'm
      probably conflating the
      > things that have been said to me over the years). Then she hurried
      past me.
      >
      > It's usually silly schoolboys or men in pairs/groups/speeding cars
      or drunken homeless
      > women who say these things to me. I was a too gobsmacked to say
      anything to this mere girl!
      > No witty comments came to mind. Tongue broken, as Sappho would say.
      >
      > I decided to take the train instead.
      >
      > I asked a few friends including Michael for possible retorts, but
      I'm kinda over that now. I
      > thought I'd simply post this here.
      >
    • citychick1000
      Just curious, are you in Perth? ... run, you bitch . I ... a song, someone who ... around and asked, are ... She hesitated, as if ... yes, you don t belong
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 2, 2006
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        Just curious, are you in Perth?

        --- In unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com, long_legged_fly <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > I don't usually bother talking about such things, but...
        >
        > I was running for the bus the other day when I heard someone say,
        "run, you bitch". I
        > wondered if this was being said by someone who was singing along to
        a song, someone who
        > was talking to herself, or someone who was talking to me. I turned
        around and asked, "are
        > you talking to me?". The girl was maybe 16 and wearing a backpack.
        She hesitated, as if
        > surprised by the fact that I was addressing her, and then said,
        "yes, you don't belong here --
        > go back to where you came from", or something to that effect (I'm
        probably conflating the
        > things that have been said to me over the years). Then she hurried
        past me.
        >
        > It's usually silly schoolboys or men in pairs/groups/speeding cars
        or drunken homeless
        > women who say these things to me. I was a too gobsmacked to say
        anything to this mere girl!
        > No witty comments came to mind. Tongue broken, as Sappho would say.
        >
        > I decided to take the train instead.
        >
        > I asked a few friends including Michael for possible retorts, but
        I'm kinda over that now. I
        > thought I'd simply post this here.
        >
      • citychick1000
        Also, in response to your not-quite-question, how about a simple Fuck you ? ;) ... run, you bitch . I ... a song, someone who ... around and asked, are ...
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 2, 2006
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          Also, in response to your not-quite-question, how about a simple "Fuck
          you"?

          ;)

          --- In unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com, long_legged_fly <no_reply@...> wrote:
          >
          > I don't usually bother talking about such things, but...
          >
          > I was running for the bus the other day when I heard someone say,
          "run, you bitch". I
          > wondered if this was being said by someone who was singing along to
          a song, someone who
          > was talking to herself, or someone who was talking to me. I turned
          around and asked, "are
          > you talking to me?". The girl was maybe 16 and wearing a backpack.
          She hesitated, as if
          > surprised by the fact that I was addressing her, and then said,
          "yes, you don't belong here --
          > go back to where you came from", or something to that effect (I'm
          probably conflating the
          > things that have been said to me over the years). Then she hurried
          past me.
          >
          > It's usually silly schoolboys or men in pairs/groups/speeding cars
          or drunken homeless
          > women who say these things to me. I was a too gobsmacked to say
          anything to this mere girl!
          > No witty comments came to mind. Tongue broken, as Sappho would say.
          >
          > I decided to take the train instead.
          >
          > I asked a few friends including Michael for possible retorts, but
          I'm kinda over that now. I
          > thought I'd simply post this here.
          >
        • mandreox
          Fly teaches college English in Perth, Australia. Her brother-in-law hails from Perth, Scotland; Fly s sister is a doctor in Edinburgh. They were married in
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 4, 2006
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            Fly teaches college English in Perth, Australia. Her brother-in-law
            hails from Perth, Scotland; Fly's sister is a doctor in Edinburgh.
            They were married in Sidney, Australia. I saw the wedding photos;
            the women in the bride's party, as I recall, wore traditional
            Vietnamese gowns, but the men in the groom's party definitely wore
            kilts. Guys in skirts are a laugh. In high school I dated a girl from
            Perth, Ontario. Her favorite violent imprecation: Son of a Peach!
            Violent speech in small-town Ontario in 1964 was remarkably bland.
            You want to ask, was it better then?

            --- In unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com, citychick1000 wrote:

            Just curious, are you in Perth?

            --- In unmuzzledox@yahoogroups.com, long_legged_fly wrote:

            > > I don't usually bother talking about such things, but...
            > >
            > > I was running for the bus the other day when I heard someone say,
            > "run, you bitch". I
            > > wondered if this was being said by someone who was singing along
            to
            > a song, someone who
            > > was talking to herself, or someone who was talking to me. I turned
            > around and asked, "are
            > > you talking to me?". The girl was maybe 16 and wearing a backpack.
            > She hesitated, as if
            > > surprised by the fact that I was addressing her, and then said,
            > "yes, you don't belong here --
            > > go back to where you came from", or something to that effect (I'm
            > probably conflating the
            > > things that have been said to me over the years). Then she hurried
            > past me.
            > >
            > > It's usually silly schoolboys or men in pairs/groups/speeding cars
            > or drunken homeless
            > > women who say these things to me. I was a too gobsmacked to say
            > anything to this mere girl!
            > > No witty comments came to mind. Tongue broken, as Sappho would
            say.
            > >
            > > I decided to take the train instead.
            > >
            > > I asked a few friends including Michael for possible retorts, but
            > I'm kinda over that now. I
            > > thought I'd simply post this here.
            > >
            >
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