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Re: [uk_jugglers] Even More jugglers on TV!

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  • Glyn Hanton
    ... putting ... last night? I think all these things are interesting the first time you see them. How dull is the traditional strong man act, but it still
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 20, 2002
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      > Well, sort of.
      >
      > Am I the only one who *completely* agreed with Alexei Sayle (sp?)
      putting
      > new circus in general and specifically Cirque du Solei in room 101
      last night?

      I think all these things are interesting the first time you see them.
      How dull is the traditional strong man act, but it still draws crowds
      in the olympics. You have to be careful or it ends up that all we're
      ever watching is comedians who happen to be able to juggle, as opposed
      to watching juggling, and we'd miss out on numerous great juggling
      acts.

      Lets face it, it's all just about spangly waistcoats anyway.

      > Especially slow, tortuous acro acts.

      They're fine, as long as they're performed by women wearing very few
      clothes. I suspect that people will have different preferences to me
      on this one though.

      --
      Glyn Hanton
      Loaded Dice Design and Media

      tel : 01727 757650 www.MadEyeDeer.com
      mob : 07957 303251
      glyn@...
      www.loadeddice.co.uk
    • Ian Haworth
      With the convention season warming up again, I thought I d share these suprisingly apt references that I came across in Brewer s. My favourite is the Castle
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 20, 2002
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        With the convention season warming up again, I thought I'd share these
        suprisingly apt references that I came across in Brewer's.

        My favourite is the 'Castle of Bungay', where for Castle you should read
        Convention. :o)

        Ian


        Bungay play.

        Leading with the highest scoring cards in WHIST, instead of attempting
        any finesse. It may be a corruption of "bungling" or a reference to the
        supposed rustic slow-wittedness of the people of Bungay in Suffolk.


        Go to Bungay with you!

        i.e. get away and don't bother me; don't talk such stuff. Bungay in
        Suffolk was famous for the manufacture of leather breeches, once very
        fashionable. Persons who required new ones re-seated went or sent to
        Bungay for them. Hence rose the cant saying, "Go to Bungay, and get
        your breeches mended", shortened into "Go to Bungay with you!"


        Castle of Bungay.

        In Camden's Britannia (1607) the following lines are attributed to Lord
        Bigod of Bungay on the borders of Suffolk and Norfolk:

        Were I in my castle of Bungay
        Upon the river of Waveney,
        I would ne care for the king of Cockney.

        The events referred to belong to the reign of Stephen or Henry II. The
        French have the proverb: Je ne voudrais pas être roi, si j'étais prévôt
        de Bar-sur-Aube (the most lucrative and honourable of all the
        provostships in France). A similar idea is expressed in the words:

        And often to our comfort, we shall find
        The sharded beetle in a safer hold
        Than is the full-winged eagle.
        SHAKESPEARE: Cymbeline, III, iii.

        Similarly Pope says:

        And more true joy Marcellus called feels
        Than Cæsar with a senate at his heels.
        Essay on Man, iv, 257.
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