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Railway bridge floras Bhutan

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  • Christopher Roy Fraser-Jenkins
    Dear all, About old bridges, sometimes you get really surprising and interesting things growing on old railway-bridges, including rare Asplenium hybrids,
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 1, 2009
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      Dear all,
      About old bridges, sometimes you get really surprising and interesting things growing on old railway-bridges, including rare Asplenium hybrids, exotics like Cystopteris regia (in the 19th Century in, I think, Leighton, Essex!), and so on. I remember being very puzzled to find some adventive plants of "Limestone Polypody", Gymnocarpium robertianum on the old BR walls leading up to Bridgend station (Glamorgan) in the 1970s, though, as so often, the wall was cleaned not long afterwards.
      Here in Nepal I found Pteris parkeriana, which is an E. Asian exotic (widely cultivated under its synonym, P. cretica var. albolineata)on an old brick wall in Kathmandu on the way to my son's school (no trains in Nepal), and it has survived several cleanings-up over the years.
      I also have, sporing itself in my back-yard, Asplenium scolopendrium, the Hart's Tongue, grown from spores from a plant originally growing on the pedestrian railway bridge in Oxford, just on the South side of the station. It is quite at home in Kathmandu - one of the very few British immigrants that are (I have a rather weak plant of much prized Dryopteris filix-mas, Male Fern, in a pot!). I think it reveals its southern Mediterranean-Atlantic origins in being happy to spore itself here. A recent paper in the Indian Fern Journal reported it from various places in India, but it was all quite mistaken and occurs absolutely nowhere within thousands of miles of the Indian subcontinent, not even as an adventive - except the sporelings from Oxford in my "garden", which I'm quite pleased by, despite their phytogeographical incongruity.
      Chris Fraser-Jenkins, Kathmandu.

      --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "Nick Trotman" <npt@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Howard,
      >
      > I've no Idea about the other clump but as the site is only 5 miles down the road I can always go and try and get a clearer shot for you to look at.
      >
      > The bridge has been there since about 1900 give or take so it could have been there for some time!!
      >
      > Thanks for the ID's
      >
      > Nick
    • Nick Trotman
      Thanks for that - it s a subject I d never thought of. You certainly travel to some exotic places ... Leighton, Brigend I can see why you went to Kathmandu
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 2, 2009
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        Thanks for that - it's a subject I'd never thought of.  You certainly travel to some exotic places ... Leighton, Brigend I can see why you went to Kathmandu for some peace and quiet:D.

        Nick,

        North Warwickshire


        --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Roy Fraser-Jenkins" <chrisophilus@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear all,
        > About old bridges, sometimes you get really surprising and interesting things growing on old railway-bridges, including rare Asplenium hybrids, exotics like Cystopteris regia (in the 19th Century in, I think, Leighton, Essex!), and so on. I remember being very puzzled to find some adventive plants of "Limestone Polypody", Gymnocarpium robertianum on the old BR walls leading up to Bridgend station (Glamorgan) in the 1970s, though, as so often, the wall was cleaned not long afterwards.
        > Here in Nepal I found Pteris parkeriana, which is an E. Asian exotic (widely cultivated under its synonym, P. cretica var. albolineata)on an old brick wall in Kathmandu on the way to my son's school (no trains in Nepal), and it has survived several cleanings-up over the years.
        > I also have, sporing itself in my back-yard, Asplenium scolopendrium, the Hart's Tongue, grown from spores from a plant originally growing on the pedestrian railway bridge in Oxford, just on the South side of the station. It is quite at home in Kathmandu - one of the very few British immigrants that are (I have a rather weak plant of much prized Dryopteris filix-mas, Male Fern, in a pot!). I think it reveals its southern Mediterranean-Atlantic origins in being happy to spore itself here. A recent paper in the Indian Fern Journal reported it from various places in India, but it was all quite mistaken and occurs absolutely nowhere within thousands of miles of the Indian subcontinent, not even as an adventive - except the sporelings from Oxford in my "garden", which I'm quite pleased by, despite their phytogeographical incongruity.
        > Chris Fraser-Jenkins, Kathmandu.
        >
        > --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "Nick Trotman" npt@ wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi Howard,
        > >
        > > I've no Idea about the other clump but as the site is only 5 miles down the road I can always go and try and get a clearer shot for you to look at.
        > >
        > > The bridge has been there since about 1900 give or take so it could have been there for some time!!
        > >
        > > Thanks for the ID's
        > >
        > > Nick
        >
      • Howard Matthews
        Hello Christopher et al, We have Pteris parkeriana, syn. P. cretica var. albolineata, growing on basement walls not far from Baker Street in Central London,
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 9, 2009
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          Hello Christopher et al,
           
          We have Pteris parkeriana, syn. P. cretica var. albolineata, growing on basement walls not far from Baker Street in Central London, where the warmer microclimate of the city aids its survival.  Presumably it has arisen from spores from cultivated houseplants. 
           
          Actually, I was shown it there four years ago: whether it persists I do not know, for apart from the fact that the 2008/9 winter was colder than the previous few, plants growing in such places are highly vulnerable to the effects of property maintenance and redevelopment. 
           
          Do I take it that P. parkeriana is yet another name change, for I knew it as P. nipponica?
           
          Regards,
          Howard Matthews.




        • Christopher Roy Fraser-Jenkins
          Dear Howard, That is a most interesting record of an adventive. Here in Kathmandu it is still (just) surviving on an old wall by my son s school at Maephi,
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 9, 2009
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            Dear Howard,
            That is a most interesting record of an adventive. Here in Kathmandu it is still (just) surviving on an old wall by my son's school at Maephi, all too often half cleaned away, and is adventive in Nepal too, being a far-eastern species. There is a nice cristate form of it growing in a garden in Kalimpong, Darjeeling - the great nursery area (though the selection of garden plants available in India nowadays is usually rather poor and limited). I suppose some authority or organisation keeps a note of adventive species occurring, somewhat ephemerally sometimes, in the UK?
            Actually the name-change was perhaps rather the P. nipponica of W.C. Shieh from Taiwan in 1966. Before that, the white-striped form (a common occurrence in many Pteris species among other genera) was always known as P. cretica var. albolineata going by the early Victorian, wide species-concepts of Thomas Moore. But in fact it was realised long before Shieh that it was not P. cretica and it was described nicely in the Gardener's Chronicle (vol. 51, page 160 (1912)) from a British garden. In the 1960s plants described from gardens were not valid under the Code, but they have been for many decades since, quite rightly. So P. parkeri (I mistakenly said "parkeriana" - sorry!) has priority by a long time. It was a note from the Editor of the Gardener's Chronicle, who gave it anonymously. So it is P. parkeri hort, but it can also be cited as "hort ex" whoever that editor was - I forgot to check it out when I was last in Britain.
            All the best,
            Chris.


            --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, Howard Matthews <howard.fernman@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello Christopher et al,
            >
            > We have Pteris parkeriana, syn. P. cretica var. albolineata, growing on
            > basement walls not far from Baker Street in Central London, where the warmer
            > microclimate of the city aids its survival. Presumably it has arisen from
            > spores from cultivated houseplants.
            >
            > Actually, I was shown it there four years ago: whether it persists I do not
            > know, for apart from the fact that the 2008/9 winter was colder than the
            > previous few, plants growing in such places are highly vulnerable to the
            > effects of property maintenance and redevelopment.
            >
            > Do I take it that P. parkeriana is yet another name change, for I knew it as
            > P. nipponica?
            >
            > Regards,
            > Howard Matthews.
            >
            >
            >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Nick Trotman
            Hi guys, I was out at the weekend looking for a fairly rare butterfly for the midlands and i came across this in the middle of a bog in Shropshire
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 23, 2009
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              Hi guys,

              I was out at the weekend looking for a fairly rare butterfly for the midlands and i came across this in the middle of a bog in Shropshire

              [URL=http://s128.photobucket.com/albums/p175/nick_the_grief/ID_wanted/?action=view¤t=IMG_6243.jpg][IMG]http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p175/nick_the_grief/ID_wanted/th_IMG_6243.jpg%5b/IMG][/URL]

              Am I right in thinking it's Osmunda regalis

              I just wasn't expecting to come across it where it was

              Nick
            • steve.woodward@ntlworld.com
              Sorry Nick, but I can t get either of those links to work? ... From: Nick Trotman npt@sasmail.net Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2009 19:49:18 -0000 To:
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 23, 2009
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                Sorry Nick, but I can't get either of those links to work?


                Original Message:
                -----------------
                From: Nick Trotman npt@...
                Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2009 19:49:18 -0000
                To: uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [uk-ferns] Re: ID's wanted


                Hi guys,

                I was out at the weekend looking for a fairly rare butterfly for the
                midlands and i came
                across this in the middle of a bog in Shropshire

                [URL=http://s128.photobucket.com/albums/p175/nick_the_grief/ID_wanted/?
                action=view¤t=IMG_6243.jpg][IMG]http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p17
                5/nick_the_gri
                ef/ID_wanted/th_IMG_6243.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

                Am I right in thinking it's Osmunda regalis

                I just wasn't expecting to come across it where it was

                Nick



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              • Nick Trotman
                ... Not my day for link today - I ve struggled at work!! I ll try again - they work for me but it might be because I m logged in to Photobucket. If all else
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 23, 2009
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                  --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "steve.woodward@..." <steve.woodward@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Sorry Nick, but I can't get either of those links to work?
                  >
                  >
                  > Original Message:
                  > -----------------

                  Not my day for link today - I've struggled at work!!

                  I'll try again - they work for me but it might be because I'm logged in to Photobucket. If all else fails I'll post it in my folder

                  Thanks for looking

                  Nick
                • MATT BUSBY
                  Its Osmunda regalis (Royal fern) ....................Matt B ... From: Nick Trotman Subject: [uk-ferns] Re: ID s wanted To:
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 24, 2009
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                    Its Osmunda regalis (Royal fern) ....................Matt B

                    --- On Tue, 23/6/09, Nick Trotman <npt@...> wrote:

                    From: Nick Trotman <npt@...>
                    Subject: [uk-ferns] Re: ID's wanted
                    To: uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Tuesday, 23 June, 2009, 8:49 PM

                    Hi guys,

                    I was out at the weekend looking for a fairly rare butterfly for the midlands and i came across this in the middle of a bog in Shropshire

                    [URL=http://s128. photobucket. com/albums/ p175/nick_ the_grief/ ID_wanted/ ?action=view& current=IMG_ 6243.jpg][IMG]http://i128. photobucket. com/albums/ p175/nick_ the_grief/ ID_wanted/ th_IMG_6243. jpg[/IMG][/URL]

                    Am I right in thinking it's Osmunda regalis

                    I just wasn't expecting to come across it where it was

                    Nick

                  • Christopher Roy Fraser-Jenkins
                    As a matter of interest, I wonder what the butterfly was, and if you found it? I had a passing interest in butterflies here in Nepal, too. A few Summers ago I
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 24, 2009
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                      As a matter of interest, I wonder what the butterfly was, and if you found it?
                      I had a passing interest in butterflies here in Nepal, too. A few Summers ago I counted 225 species of butterflies around my parents-in-law's village in Gorkha District, with the help of an excellent book on Nepalese butterflies by the famous Colin Smith. I never realised there would be so many when I started stalking them to see them closely. I also grew some Blue Admiral Caterpillars, which is a beautiful butterfly, though a very fast flier indeed - and we get several big friendly swallow-tails that swoop around and have curious green caterpillars on the orange trees, even in a small back-garden..
                      Cheers,
                      Chris.
                    • Nick Trotman
                      ... Hi Chris, We started off after Sliver studded Blue - got that and then went to this site for Large Heath which we saw the odd one or two flying but
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jun 26, 2009
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                        --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Roy Fraser-Jenkins" <chrisophilus@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > As a matter of interest, I wonder what the butterfly was, and if you found it?
                        > I had a passing interest in butterflies here in Nepal, too. A few Summers ago I counted 225 species of butterflies around my parents-in-law's village in Gorkha District, with the help of an excellent book on Nepalese butterflies by the famous Colin Smith. I never realised there would be so many when I started stalking them to see them closely. I also grew some Blue Admiral Caterpillars, which is a beautiful butterfly, though a very fast flier indeed - and we get several big friendly swallow-tails that swoop around and have curious green caterpillars on the orange trees, even in a small back-garden..
                        > Cheers,
                        > Chris.
                        >

                        Hi Chris,

                        We started off after Sliver studded Blue - got that and then went to this site for Large Heath which we saw the odd one or two flying but couldn't get a photo unfortunately.

                        Nick
                      • Nick Trotman
                        ... Thanks Matt, I do they grow easy from spores? I was tempted to borrow a small piece to try but having never tried to grow ferns before thought better of
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jun 26, 2009
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                          --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, MATT BUSBY <matt4u@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Its Osmunda regalis (Royal fern) ....................Matt B
                          >
                          > --- On Tue, 23/6/09, Nick Trotman <npt@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > From: Nick Trotman <npt@...>
                          > Subject: [uk-ferns] Re: ID's wanted
                          > To: uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com
                          > Date: Tuesday, 23 June, 2009, 8:49 PM
                          >

                          Thanks Matt,

                          I do they grow easy from spores? I was tempted to "borrow" a small piece to try but having never tried to grow ferns before thought better of it.

                          Nick
                        • MATT BUSBY
                          Osmunda regalis is one of the quickest and most reliable ferns to grow from spores, but they are green and are viable only for a few days. They should be sown
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jun 26, 2009
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                            Osmunda regalis is one of the quickest and most reliable ferns to grow from spores, but they are green and are viable only for a few days. They should be sown as soon as they are collected. They are producing spores now but all will have gone by July.

                            --- On Fri, 26/6/09, Nick Trotman <npt@...> wrote:

                            From: Nick Trotman <npt@...>
                            Subject: [uk-ferns] Re: ID's wanted
                            To: uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Friday, 26 June, 2009, 4:02 PM

                            --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroup s.com, MATT BUSBY <matt4u@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Its Osmunda regalis (Royal fern) ............ ........Matt B
                            >
                            > --- On Tue, 23/6/09, Nick Trotman <npt@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > From: Nick Trotman <npt@...>
                            > Subject: [uk-ferns] Re: ID's wanted
                            > To: uk-ferns@yahoogroup s.com
                            > Date: Tuesday, 23 June, 2009, 8:49 PM
                            >

                            Thanks Matt,

                            I do they grow easy from spores? I was tempted to "borrow" a small piece to try but having never tried to grow ferns before thought better of it.

                            Nick

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