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Re: fungi/mould on spore sown trays

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  • albert6371
    ... off at ... to ... 10 ... only ... yet. Is ... affect/damage the ... treat ... received. ... alternative is to prick out the healthy fern prothalli and
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
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      --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Woodward"
      <steve.woodward@...> wrote:
      >
      > I too would be interested if anyone knows the answer to this (Is
      > Cheshunt compund safe on sporelings?)as I use it to keep damping
      off at
      > bay on onion and other seedlings
      >
      > Steve
      >
      >
      > --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "philb99992001" <Philip.Ball7@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello all, my first post and a question for those "in the know".
      > > I've sown some spore recently onto sphagnum peat which ive heated
      to
      > > around 100 degrees C in a soil sterilizer. The pot has gone into a
      > > sealed plastic bag and placed in my warm greenhouse - minimum of
      10
      > > degrees C. I've noticed this week that there is a white "web" of
      > > fungal growth spreading across the compost surface (it's not
      > > botrytis). As yet there is no sign of spore germination - they've
      only
      > > been sown for a few weeks and im not expecting any growth just
      yet. Is
      > > the fungal "web" anything to worry about and will it
      affect/damage the
      > > germinating spores and the resulting prothali ? If so, how do i
      treat
      > > it ? Cheshunt compound ? Any assistance would be gratefully
      received.
      > >
      > > many thanks
      > >
      > > Phil
      > >
      >I have used cheshunt compound safely on fern prothalli. An
      alternative is to 'prick out' the healthy fern prothalli and discard
      the infected material.
      It is unnecessary to 'cook' peat before sowing sowing spores. All you
      require is a relatively sterile surface on which to sow the spores.
      A kettle of boiling water poured over the surface of the peat in the
      pot will provide a suitably sterile surface. cover the peat with
      tissue paper to prevent washing peat over the sides of the pot. wait
      until peat is cool before sowing.
      I have been using this method for 30 years and it rarely lets me
      down. Infections usually occur because a drip of infected water has
      been allowed to touch the prothalli. remember also to clean the pot
      throughly before using, even if its a new pot.
    • Roger Golding
      I ve used Cheshunt compound with partial success on sporelings infested with white fungal growth in a covered seed tray. But I ve never tried it with
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 2, 2007
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        I've used Cheshunt compound with partial success on sporelings
        infested with white fungal growth in a covered seed tray. But I've
        never tried it with ungerminated spores. I imagine it's worth trying -
        if you don't do anything it's likely you'll lose the spores anyway.

        Roger

        --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "albert6371" <matt4u@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Woodward"
        > <steve.woodward@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I too would be interested if anyone knows the answer to this (Is
        > > Cheshunt compund safe on sporelings?)as I use it to keep damping
        > off at
        > > bay on onion and other seedlings
        > >
        > > Steve
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "philb99992001" <Philip.Ball7@>
        > > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hello all, my first post and a question for those "in the know".
        > > > I've sown some spore recently onto sphagnum peat which ive
        heated
        > to
        > > > around 100 degrees C in a soil sterilizer. The pot has gone
        into a
        > > > sealed plastic bag and placed in my warm greenhouse - minimum
        of
        > 10
        > > > degrees C. I've noticed this week that there is a white "web" of
        > > > fungal growth spreading across the compost surface (it's not
        > > > botrytis). As yet there is no sign of spore germination -
        they've
        > only
        > > > been sown for a few weeks and im not expecting any growth just
        > yet. Is
        > > > the fungal "web" anything to worry about and will it
        > affect/damage the
        > > > germinating spores and the resulting prothali ? If so, how do i
        > treat
        > > > it ? Cheshunt compound ? Any assistance would be gratefully
        > received.
        > > >
        > > > many thanks
        > > >
        > > > Phil
        > > >
        > >I have used cheshunt compound safely on fern prothalli. An
        > alternative is to 'prick out' the healthy fern prothalli and
        discard
        > the infected material.
        > It is unnecessary to 'cook' peat before sowing sowing spores. All
        you
        > require is a relatively sterile surface on which to sow the spores.
        > A kettle of boiling water poured over the surface of the peat in
        the
        > pot will provide a suitably sterile surface. cover the peat with
        > tissue paper to prevent washing peat over the sides of the pot.
        wait
        > until peat is cool before sowing.
        > I have been using this method for 30 years and it rarely lets me
        > down. Infections usually occur because a drip of infected water has
        > been allowed to touch the prothalli. remember also to clean the pot
        > throughly before using, even if its a new pot.
        >
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