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Re: FERN GROWING 2013

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  • Steve
    A bit of the opposite I am finding, everything seems to be growing massive and very lush foliage especially after the previous severe winters and now a wet
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 4, 2013
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      A bit of the opposite I am finding, everything seems to be growing massive and very lush foliage especially after the previous severe winters and now a wet spring followed by an upturn in temperatures, what did die off or struggle after the severe winters were the tree ferns which decided they did not like -15, and we all learned from that, but everything else seems so far this year to be a mass of green fronds

      --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "terry947464" <terrylarkham@...> wrote:
      >
      > Good evening fellow gardeners
      >
      > Is anyone still growing ferns in the UK? I have been patiently waiting for fellow enthusiasts to tell me how their year has been going but no messages about fern gardening in 2013! Perhaps we have all been waiting for each other, in which case may I start the ball rolling.
      >
      > Here in Gloucestershire winter was quite helpful, plenty of rain and no severe frosts (<-10). March saw the start of activity in my collection of 250+ and then April......
      >
      > The cold spring brought a sudden halt to growth, early starters such as Dryopteris lacera and D.blanfordii went back into hibernation and it was May before growth resumed, even now it is not what it should be. Other Dryopteris (eg conjugata and wallichiana) have put up a couple of fronds and although there seem to be several pregnant-looking buds they do not as yet want to turn into croziers, I am concerned that if they have atrophied the plants may not put on enough growth to sustain them through the winter.
      >
      > Woodwardias (which have survived -15 in my garden) have been slow and growth is rather stunted. In addition W. unigemmata which definitely has some atrophied buds is being attacked by some pest -slugs? - a problem I have not had before. Athyriums have had mixed fortunes, most painted ferns look fine but some cultivars (eg otophorum and Lady in Red) have only started growth in the last few weeks as have many borderline cultivars for the open garden (Rumhora, Microlepia and Pteris wallichiana). On the other hand Asplenium scolopendrium, Polystichum setiferum and native Dryopteris cultivars are all doing well. As ferns are described as 'primitive' plants, are they ill-equipped to deal with disturbed weather patterns?
      >
      > Well I could go on but I hope you may be interested in my experiences and tell me of your own. I would be surprised if my experience has been unique.
      >
      > Looking forward to replies
      >
      > Terry Larkham
      >
    • terry947464
      Hi Steve, thanks for the reply, at least two of us still at it! I was puzzled by (and envious of) your report. I see your address is Derbyshire, would that be
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 19, 2013
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        Hi Steve, thanks for the reply, at least two of us still at it!

        I was puzzled by (and envious of) your report. I see your address is Derbyshire, would that be the Peak District? I just wonder if being rather colder than down here the start-stop-start with you was not as marked and therefore less of a problem. Now of course we are at the other extreme. Some plants showing signs of heat stress and others (Osmunda, Onoclea, Thelypteris)seem to have completed their annual cycle early and are dying back. Still having trouble with Woodwardia unigemmata, new growth is being immediately mutilated by something, not had this problem before - any ideas?

        Good growing

        Terry

        --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <steve.woodward@...> wrote:
        >
        > A bit of the opposite I am finding, everything seems to be growing massive and very lush foliage especially after the previous severe winters and now a wet spring followed by an upturn in temperatures, what did die off or struggle after the severe winters were the tree ferns which decided they did not like -15, and we all learned from that, but everything else seems so far this year to be a mass of green fronds
        >
        > --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "terry947464" <terrylarkham@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Good evening fellow gardeners
        > >
        > > Is anyone still growing ferns in the UK? I have been patiently waiting for fellow enthusiasts to tell me how their year has been going but no messages about fern gardening in 2013! Perhaps we have all been waiting for each other, in which case may I start the ball rolling.
        > >
        > > Here in Gloucestershire winter was quite helpful, plenty of rain and no severe frosts (<-10). March saw the start of activity in my collection of 250+ and then April......
        > >
        > > The cold spring brought a sudden halt to growth, early starters such as Dryopteris lacera and D.blanfordii went back into hibernation and it was May before growth resumed, even now it is not what it should be. Other Dryopteris (eg conjugata and wallichiana) have put up a couple of fronds and although there seem to be several pregnant-looking buds they do not as yet want to turn into croziers, I am concerned that if they have atrophied the plants may not put on enough growth to sustain them through the winter.
        > >
        > > Woodwardias (which have survived -15 in my garden) have been slow and growth is rather stunted. In addition W. unigemmata which definitely has some atrophied buds is being attacked by some pest -slugs? - a problem I have not had before. Athyriums have had mixed fortunes, most painted ferns look fine but some cultivars (eg otophorum and Lady in Red) have only started growth in the last few weeks as have many borderline cultivars for the open garden (Rumhora, Microlepia and Pteris wallichiana). On the other hand Asplenium scolopendrium, Polystichum setiferum and native Dryopteris cultivars are all doing well. As ferns are described as 'primitive' plants, are they ill-equipped to deal with disturbed weather patterns?
        > >
        > > Well I could go on but I hope you may be interested in my experiences and tell me of your own. I would be surprised if my experience has been unique.
        > >
        > > Looking forward to replies
        > >
        > > Terry Larkham
        > >
        >
      • steve
        Hi Terry, South Derbyshire (between Nottingham and Derby) One here that really struggles in hot weather is Matteuccia struthiopteris it gives up and dies off
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 20, 2013
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          Hi Terry, South Derbyshire (between Nottingham and Derby) One here that really struggles in hot weather is Matteuccia struthiopteris it gives up and dies off in hot temps but bounces back fine the following year bounces back being the operative words, usually in a few places in the lawn! I have heard of a type of slug that will attack some fronds a small thin black slug liken the keel slugs that attack potato‚Äôs and also a small green caterpillar that has been known to attack fronds although they are usually pretty much pest free.  Woodwardia unigemmata I find pretty slow growing but pest free here whereas fimbriata and radicans romp away
           
          Steve
           
          Sent: Friday, July 19, 2013 9:55 PM
          Subject: [uk-ferns] Re: FERN GROWING 2013
           
           

          Hi Steve, thanks for the reply, at least two of us still at it!

          I was puzzled by (and envious of) your report. I see your address is Derbyshire, would that be the Peak District? I just wonder if being rather colder than down here the start-stop-start with you was not as marked and therefore less of a problem. Now of course we are at the other extreme. Some plants showing signs of heat stress and others (Osmunda, Onoclea, Thelypteris)seem to have completed their annual cycle early and are dying back. Still having trouble with

          Good growing

          Terry


          Woodwardia unigemmata, new growth is being immediately mutilated by something, not had this problem before - any ideas?

          Good growing

          Terry

          --- In mailto:uk-ferns%40yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <steve.woodward@...> wrote:

          >
          > A bit of the opposite
          I am finding, everything seems to be growing massive and very lush foliage especially after the previous severe winters and now a wet spring followed by an upturn in temperatures, what did die off or struggle after the severe winters were the tree ferns which decided they did not like -15, and we all learned from that, but everything else seems so far this year to be a mass of green fronds
          >
          > --- In
          href="mailto:uk-ferns%40yahoogroups.com">mailto:uk-ferns%40yahoogroups.com, "terry947464" <terrylarkham@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Good
          evening fellow gardeners
          > >
          > > Is anyone still growing
          ferns in the UK? I have been patiently waiting for fellow enthusiasts to tell me how their year has been going but no messages about fern gardening in 2013! Perhaps we have all been waiting for each other, in which case may I start the ball rolling.
          > >
          > > Here in Gloucestershire winter was
          quite helpful, plenty of rain and no severe frosts (<-10). March saw the start of activity in my collection of 250+ and then April......
          > >
          > > The cold spring brought a sudden halt to growth, early starters
          such as Dryopteris lacera and D.blanfordii went back into hibernation and it was May before growth resumed, even now it is not what it should be. Other Dryopteris (eg conjugata and wallichiana) have put up a couple of fronds and although there seem to be several pregnant-looking buds they do not as yet want to turn into croziers, I am concerned that if they have atrophied the plants may not put on enough growth to sustain them through the winter.
          > >
          > > Woodwardias (which have survived -15 in my garden) have been slow
          and growth is rather stunted. In addition W. unigemmata which definitely has some atrophied buds is being attacked by some pest -slugs? - a problem I have not had before. Athyriums have had mixed fortunes, most painted ferns look fine but some cultivars (eg otophorum and Lady in Red) have only started growth in the last few weeks as have many borderline cultivars for the open garden (Rumhora, Microlepia and Pteris wallichiana). On the other hand Asplenium scolopendrium, Polystichum setiferum and native Dryopteris cultivars are all doing well. As ferns are described as 'primitive' plants, are they ill-equipped to deal with disturbed weather patterns?
          > >
          > > Well I could
          go on but I hope you may be interested in my experiences and tell me of your own. I would be surprised if my experience has been unique.
          > >
          > > Looking forward to replies
          > >
          > > Terry
          Larkham
          > >
          >

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