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Acrosticum dimorphic frond

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  • Wayne and Svetlana
    I have added 2 pics to a new album (see photos). Prof Alan Smith saw the pics and his assessment is below. Some spp. of Acrostichum, including A. danaeifolium,
    Message 1 of 2 , May 30, 2013
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      I have added 2 pics to a new album (see photos). Prof Alan Smith saw the pics and his assessment is below.

      Some spp. of Acrostichum, including A. danaeifolium, are dimorphic, i.e., with completely fertile fronds and sterile fronds. I'm guessing you are seeing the fertile fronds of this species, that you will soon see sporangia covering the undersurface. I was not aware that the fertile fronds of this species were so decidedly dimorphic, but maybe so, at least in some cases.

      I believe he is 100% correct. My question is has anyone seen this before? i searched the internet and not found any pics of this phenomenon.

      I am confident one of you Brits will have seen this before.
      Frondly Bubba (American fern nut)
    • Chris
      Apologies, I commented on your photos before I saw this, your message, and had assumed it was posted in the Indian-Fern group, and was a plant from India. Not
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 1, 2013
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        Apologies, I commented on your photos before I saw this, your message, and had assumed it was posted in the Indian-Fern group, and was a plant from India. Not sure how I received a message from the uk-ferns group for the first time ever as that doesn't normally happen - I only get them from the Indian-Ferns group, sorry I was confused as to the origin of the plant because of that.
        The sterile fronds do look exactly like Stenochlaena palustris, though, and not at all like Acrostichum, and Stenochlanea is of course sterile-fertile dimorphic. But I have no idea what species it might be if from the New World (you didn't say where, so where was it - if we at least knew the country one could look it up), or whether there is a Stenochlaena species there that has bipinnate fertile fronds. Or if there is some other genus, like a Polybotrya, Lomariopsis, Olfersia, or something, that looks like that in the New World?
        Had it been S. palustris from India as I mistakenly thought, it would have had to have been a teratological bipinnate fertile frond as opposed to the normal simply pinnate fronds.
        Try Robbin Moran?
        Cheers,
        Chris Fraser-Jenkins, Kathmandu.

        --- In uk-ferns@yahoogroups.com, "Wayne and Svetlana" <vafernbubba@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have added 2 pics to a new album (see photos). Prof Alan Smith saw the pics and his assessment is below.
        >
        > Some spp. of Acrostichum, including A. danaeifolium, are dimorphic, i.e., with completely fertile fronds and sterile fronds. I'm guessing you are seeing the fertile fronds of this species, that you will soon see sporangia covering the undersurface. I was not aware that the fertile fronds of this species were so decidedly dimorphic, but maybe so, at least in some cases.
        >
        > I believe he is 100% correct. My question is has anyone seen this before? i searched the internet and not found any pics of this phenomenon.
        >
        > I am confident one of you Brits will have seen this before.
        > Frondly Bubba (American fern nut)
        >
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