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Re: [ujeni] Lake Malawi Temperature

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  • Don & Cathy Weber
    Julie, Richa, Ally, and Kim...Re: Photo. Do recognize your house as it was June 2004? Glad we knew where to look or we sure wouldn t have. _______ Jesse, As
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 14, 2005
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      Julie, Richa, Ally, and Kim...Re: Photo.  Do recognize your house as it was June 2004?  Glad we knew where to look or we sure wouldn't have. 
      _______
       
      Jesse,
       
      As always you're information is really intriguing though quite overwhelming.  So I have this question.  I listen to these guys on NPR a lot, this time a BBC program I'm sure.  This Brit...unfortunately my mind tuned in after they said who he was, most assuredly government...said that with climate changes, sub Saharan Africa is going to continue to face droughts.  And because of that, all the aid money available will have to go to famine relief instead of development.  In view of what you are saying, does it prove or disprove his predictions...that graph is in years x 1000, right?   So how does one know ... appears that we are in a just a moderately high temperature period.  But you can't predict much of anything from it can you?  Look how variable.  And how can you even graph a beginning spike on a "years x 1,000" graph?  I'm an older woman; I'm allowed, actually expected, to be stupid about these things.
       
      What was climate like 5,000 years ago when lake temps were considerably higher?   Does temp increase always bring drought to Africa?   If so, I guess with fewer people and different ways of obtaining food, drought would not have been so critical.  Seems, if one reads Stacia Norden's comments about diversifying and thinking of more drought hardy crops, those changes might help, that is if we are in an upward temperature and drying trend.  Change is hard, and I must admit that lump of nsima made me feel satisfied with little else to go with it. 
       
      You're right.  "It's a tough place to live, Malawi."
       
      Cathy
       
       

    • Jesse Johnson
      Hi Cathy, Well, I was attracted to that article because it is recent (2005), and deals with Malawi. I have fun thinking about a bunch of geophysicists trying
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 16, 2005
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        Hi Cathy,

        Well, I was attracted to that article because it is recent (2005), and
        deals with Malawi. I have fun thinking about a bunch of geophysicists
        trying to acquire a lake core in Malawi.

        Then I started thinking about the data. It shows huge changes in
        temperature. I don't think one can say, oh, it's hot, that means
        drought, or vice versa. But what you can say (I think) is that there are
        giant swings on a scale of thousands of years. If anything, lakes have
        a calming effect on big swings (all that water doesn't like to change
        its temperature), away from the lake it was likely even worse.

        Thousands of years, thats the kind of time one needs to do things like;
        domesticate a chicken, selectively breed crops to get higher yields,
        find ways to store harvests, or just identify good species to focus on.
        Well, about the time you start to make headway on any of that, you are
        suddenly living in another world, climate wise.

        And what you really need, if your going to develop science, religion,
        arts, and culture, government and law, what you really need, is
        agricultural stability.

        This graph shows that (probably) Southern Africa never got that.

        And maybe (maybe) that is part of why Africa is the way it is.

        Maybe. It's a question I can't stop thinking about.

        Good to hear from you. Attached is a photo of the boys. They are about
        to participate in this great Montana tradition, hunting. Just driving
        around really, looking out of a truck for elk. This is part of how we
        get on with the neighbors. But they do love to get dressed up.

        Jesse
      • Daniel Dudley
        God, Jessie, the kids look GREAT!!! Nice article that you sent around, and thoughts here, interesting to think about. Can you send me a link where I can get
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 18, 2005
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          God, Jessie, the kids look GREAT!!! Nice article that you sent around, and
          thoughts here, interesting to think about. Can you send me a link where I
          can get some information on that science thing that you did last year, I
          have a student that may be interested!!!

          Dan


          >From: Jesse Johnson <johnson@...>
          >Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
          >To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [ujeni] Lake Malawi Temperature
          >Date: Thu, 17 Nov 2005 00:25:19 -0700
          >
          >Hi Cathy,
          >
          >Well, I was attracted to that article because it is recent (2005), and
          >deals with Malawi. I have fun thinking about a bunch of geophysicists
          >trying to acquire a lake core in Malawi.
          >
          >Then I started thinking about the data. It shows huge changes in
          >temperature. I don't think one can say, oh, it's hot, that means
          >drought, or vice versa. But what you can say (I think) is that there are
          >giant swings on a scale of thousands of years. If anything, lakes have
          >a calming effect on big swings (all that water doesn't like to change
          >its temperature), away from the lake it was likely even worse.
          >
          >Thousands of years, thats the kind of time one needs to do things like;
          >domesticate a chicken, selectively breed crops to get higher yields,
          >find ways to store harvests, or just identify good species to focus on.
          >Well, about the time you start to make headway on any of that, you are
          >suddenly living in another world, climate wise.
          >
          >And what you really need, if your going to develop science, religion,
          >arts, and culture, government and law, what you really need, is
          >agricultural stability.
          >
          >This graph shows that (probably) Southern Africa never got that.
          >
          >And maybe (maybe) that is part of why Africa is the way it is.
          >
          >Maybe. It's a question I can't stop thinking about.
          >
          >Good to hear from you. Attached is a photo of the boys. They are about
          >to participate in this great Montana tradition, hunting. Just driving
          >around really, looking out of a truck for elk. This is part of how we
          >get on with the neighbors. But they do love to get dressed up.
          >
          >Jesse
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


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