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Re: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?

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  • Mary Parsaca
    A pressure cooker gets those beans done in a hurry and turns shoe leather masquerading as meat into something quite edible. (It also ensures the death of any
    Message 1 of 26 , Sep 15, 2002
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      A pressure cooker gets those beans done in a hurry and turns shoe leather
      masquerading as meat into something quite edible. (It also ensures the death
      of any parasites lurking in the meat!) I remember our first chicken in
      Kenya. It was tiny, so I thought, young and tender. What a joke! It was
      fried to perfection, but we were unable to sink our teeth into it. Into the
      pressure cooker it went. In half an hour it was quite wonderful although not
      exactly crispy.

      Mary

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@...>
      To: <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2002 9:52 PM
      Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?


      > As I don't have any real idea what my meals will consist of, I'm
      > intrigued with your suggestion. What would I be cooking that would
      > possibly require a pressure cooker? Or is it just the fact that it
      > will cook faster?
      >
      > -Tighe
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In ujeni@y..., "Mary Parsaca" <mparsaca@n...> wrote:
      > > Hi Tighe,
      > > As a PCV in Kenya 30+ years ago, I found my pressure cooker to be
      > > invaluable. When my daughter, Tana Beverwyk-Abouda, went to Malawi
      > as a PCV
      > > she took one along and loved it. It's one way to conserve those fast
      > > disappearing trees in Malawi...faster cooking means less charcoal.
      > > Enjoy every minute.
      > > Mary
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@h...>
      > > To: <ujeni@y...>
      > > Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 1:19 PM
      > > Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
      > >
      > >
      > > >
      > > > Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought
      > about
      > > > the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the
      > host
      > > > family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few
      > articles
      > > > of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
      > > > people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy
      > them
      > > > in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
      > > > It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about
      > investing
      > > > in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
      > > > I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20
      > bucks.
      > > > I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)
      > > >
      > > > Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all
      > the
      > > > problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone
      > says
      > > > the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I
      > guess
      > > > you really can't ask for more.
      > > >
      > > > I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous
      > fits
      > > > I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to
      > have
      > > > an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently
      > it
      > > > still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet
      > access I
      > > > will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within
      > the
      > > > last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I
      > just
      > > > assume that will be a once a month luxury?
      > > >
      > > > -Tighe
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
    • Weber
      Stacia... I didn t know you were PCVs in Jamaica. After Peace Corps I volunteered there through Health Volunteers Overseas for 6 weeks with a community based
      Message 2 of 26 , Sep 15, 2002
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        Stacia...

        I didn't know you were PCVs in Jamaica. After Peace Corps I volunteered
        there through Health Volunteers Overseas for 6 weeks with a community based
        rehabilitation program (3D Project). I met a man PCV in Morant Bay who was
        doing some small business projects with mothers of some of the disabled kids
        out of the 3D Project office there. I worked half the time in Morant Bay
        and then in Highgate where they also had a 3D Project office. I went (bus,
        taxi??? and then walk) with community rehab workers out to rural homes of
        disabled kids. Though really a less poor country than Malawi I felt the
        depth of poverty more there...maybe because sense of community seemed less.
        Possibly it was just because I was there a short time and didn't get to know
        people and correctly interpret what I was experiencing.

        One of those funny serendipitous things happened. I met an American family
        when I went to church with the Jamaican family I was living with in
        Highgate. The American woman offered me a ride to work when she spotted me
        on the road a day or so later. I almost refused...I was close to work and
        liked the walk (not nearly as much as my walk to work in Malawi where
        everyone wanted to walk with me and talk). Decided it was kind of her to
        ask so accepted. In asking about where she was from...learned that they
        were Mennonites, hadn't lived in the U.S. for many years. Her husband was
        running the Habitat for Humanities office in Highgate, but they had been in
        Zambia before, had traveled to Blantyre and stayed at the Salvation Army
        place in Blantyre because in Zambia they worked at the Salvation Army
        Hospital. I told her that Margaret Wazakili, my closest friend in Blantyre,
        had worked there in Zambia as a physiotherapist. She said "Oh my goodness,
        Maggie! We lost track of her!" They were friends and lived as neighbors on
        the hospital grounds. Anyway, they had been in Jamaica for a year and still
        had the same sense of the difference between Jamaica and our experiences in
        southern Africa.

        A few Jamaican mothers at a 3D Project parents meeting were talking about
        how they don't show their children enough affection, how they don't hug.
        I'd really be interested in hearing your about your experiences there. I
        may go back sometime. After going I helped recruit and prepare other
        therapists to go and have kept in email touch with some who I've never met
        and with the women who started 3D. She's retired and the project is falling
        apart because of lack of funding. UNICEF funds projects for a certain
        number of years and expects them to develop their own funding sources, from
        what I understand. Disabled kids' rehab. programs are seem to be low on the
        list of government funding priorities and probably even most NGO's, though
        Malawi Against Polio has done well through Dutch NGO's and Christofer
        Blinden (sp??? German NGO?), hasn't it? Still hope that's well in place.

        Cathy




        -----Original Message-----
        From: Kristof & Stacia Nordin <nordin@...>
        To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Sunday, September 15, 2002 2:16 AM
        Subject: Re: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?


        >As PCVs in Jamaica, we also loved our pressure cooker as beans were cooked
        >very often. It would be great to have one here, too. Stacia
        >
      • wanderingdisc
        Tighe I ll be headed on over to Malawi with you as a science teacher. Where did you find the solar powered battery charger? And why was only one type of pump
        Message 3 of 26 , Sep 20, 2002
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          Tighe

          I'll be headed on over to Malawi with you as a science teacher.
          Where did you find the solar powered battery charger? And why was
          only one type of pump recommended for Afica? What are some of the
          specifications that I need to check for? I already have a pump, and
          I'll bring it if is appropriate for Africa.

          Does anyone have an email address for Tom & Ruth Nighswander? I was
          classmates with their daughter Heather back in high school. Small
          world now that I'm headed to Malawi.

          Ty
        • Eric Bone
          Timoneni mose! Here are a few highlights from the year: In January, Jacqui and I resumed cohabitating after 15 months apart. During that time she had been
          Message 4 of 26 , Dec 2, 2004
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            Timoneni mose!  Here are a few highlights from the year:
             
            In January, Jacqui and I resumed cohabitating after 15 months apart.  During that time she had been working in San Francisco and DC while I was finishing my math PhD at Brandeis University near Boston.  I finished in December and moved to DC in January to begin a 4 month stint at the National Academy of Sciences as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow (see http://www7.nationalacademies.org/policyfellows/).  I worked in the Office of International Affairs putting together websites and brochures about science advisory and development activities that the Academies undertake around the world. In fact, the website just went up at http://www.nationalacademies.org/international/, though not all the links seem to working yet.
             
            Jacqui left her job at American Councils for International Education soon after I finished my internship, and we took advantage of the time to travel.  We got to see Rand and Deb in Atlanta in June and several former northern volunteers at a gathering in North Carolina in August.  (I'll let our amazing hostess and organizer Stephanie Jayne fill you in on that one).   In between we spent a month in South Korea, traveling around the country and visiting more than 30(!) of my in-laws. 
             
            In the fall Jacqui began a new job managing nonproliferation programs at the US Civilian Research and Development Foundation (www.crdf.org).  I began a one-to-two-year fellowship through the American Assocation for the Advancement of Science (see http://fellowships.aaas.org/) at the State Department.  I am working in the Office of the Coordinator of US Assistance to Europe and Eurasia (www.state.gov/p/eur/ace).  My job is to connect and coordinate people involved in all sorts of security assistance programs, especially those that involve putting former Soviet weapons scientists to work in non-threatening situations.
             
            I always enjoy hearing people's updates, so I hope more people will find time to write.
             
            Jani umampha,
            Eric Bone
            Chintheche 1995-97


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