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Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?

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  • Tighe1
    I have been accepted to teach math in Malawi and I m leaving at the end of this month! I m super excited, especially reading all of this group s messages. I m
    Message 1 of 26 , Sep 12, 2002
      I have been accepted to teach math in Malawi and I'm leaving at the
      end of this month! I'm super excited, especially reading all of this
      group's messages. I'm a little confused about what to take for
      clothing, especially considering the conservative nature of the
      country. I was wondering if you guys could give me some pointers for
      what is acceptable or not acceptable for a teacher. Basically, I've
      been told that I need to wear pants and a button down shirt if I'm
      around town, short sleeves are acceptable. In the classroom I need to
      wear a long sleeved button down, and maybe a tie? Any pointers you
      could give would be great.

      Also, do you have any general suggestions for items you should have
      taken but didn't know about? Any suggestions are helpful, as I
      obviously don't really know what to expect :) Thanks!

      -Tighe Herren
    • holland@panasas.com
      I wasn t a teacher but I did work in the government. In the office I wore slacks, a short sleeve shirt or a long-sleeve one rolled up, and a tie most days
      Message 2 of 26 , Sep 12, 2002
        I wasn't a teacher but I did work in the government. In the office I wore slacks, a short sleeve shirt or a long-sleeve one rolled up, and a tie most days (man did I ever get sick of that blue shirt). I would often cycle in wearing shorts & a t-shirt and then change in the office.

        Outside of the office my only rule for myself was to be neat, since I found my interactions with people went much more smoothly that way. My sense of the place is that Malawians dress formally if they can possibly afford it, and find it slightly odd when someone who can afford to does not. That said, in any very casual or expatriate situation I had no problem wearing shorts and sandals.

        There used to be this great list that circulated called "things I'm really glad I brought and things I wish I had left behind". First for me in the former category was a tent, sleeping bag, and hiking boots. That opened up some great vacation opportunities. Bike tools also. I had a kit of box wrenches, screwdrivers, pliers and a few specialized bike tools (freewheel puller, spoke wrench) which saved my butt on more than one occasion. It wasn't huge: the whole thing fit in a zip-lock bag. Shoes were always expensive and a hassle to find, so I'm glad I brought both dress shoes and casual shoes. I never regretted bringing a guitar. It was a hassle to lug around sometimes but it broke the ice with my homestay families wonderfully. Everyone loved their shortwave radios. PC will provide you with mosquito netting and a first-aid kit, or at least they did when I was there.

        Have a great time, I'm more than a little jealous.

        Mark


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Tighe1 [mailto:junk9191@...]
        Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2002 6:12 PM
        To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [ujeni] Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?



        I have been accepted to teach math in Malawi and I'm leaving at the
        end of this month! I'm super excited, especially reading all of this
        group's messages. I'm a little confused about what to take for
        clothing, especially considering the conservative nature of the
        country. I was wondering if you guys could give me some pointers for
        what is acceptable or not acceptable for a teacher. Basically, I've
        been told that I need to wear pants and a button down shirt if I'm
        around town, short sleeves are acceptable. In the classroom I need to
        wear a long sleeved button down, and maybe a tie? Any pointers you
        could give would be great.

        Also, do you have any general suggestions for items you should have
        taken but didn't know about? Any suggestions are helpful, as I
        obviously don't really know what to expect :) Thanks!

        -Tighe Herren






        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • Karl Klemmick
        Mark may have never regretted bringing a guitar, but being his flatmate I m not sure I could say the same! Mark, did you ever master that poor thing? Cheers,
        Message 3 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002
          Mark may have never regretted bringing a guitar, but being his flatmate I'm
          not sure I could say the same! Mark, did you ever master that poor thing?

          Cheers,

          Karl K.

          >From: holland@...
          >Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
          >To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: RE: [ujeni] Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
          >Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2002 18:33:06 -0400
          >
          >I wasn't a teacher but I did work in the government. In the office I wore
          >slacks, a short sleeve shirt or a long-sleeve one rolled up, and a tie most
          >days (man did I ever get sick of that blue shirt). I would often cycle in
          >wearing shorts & a t-shirt and then change in the office.
          >
          >Outside of the office my only rule for myself was to be neat, since I found
          >my interactions with people went much more smoothly that way. My sense of
          >the place is that Malawians dress formally if they can possibly afford it,
          >and find it slightly odd when someone who can afford to does not. That
          >said, in any very casual or expatriate situation I had no problem wearing
          >shorts and sandals.
          >
          >There used to be this great list that circulated called "things I'm really
          >glad I brought and things I wish I had left behind". First for me in the
          >former category was a tent, sleeping bag, and hiking boots. That opened up
          >some great vacation opportunities. Bike tools also. I had a kit of box
          >wrenches, screwdrivers, pliers and a few specialized bike tools (freewheel
          >puller, spoke wrench) which saved my butt on more than one occasion. It
          >wasn't huge: the whole thing fit in a zip-lock bag. Shoes were always
          >expensive and a hassle to find, so I'm glad I brought both dress shoes and
          >casual shoes. I never regretted bringing a guitar. It was a hassle to lug
          >around sometimes but it broke the ice with my homestay families
          >wonderfully. Everyone loved their shortwave radios. PC will provide you
          >with mosquito netting and a first-aid kit, or at least they did when I was
          >there.
          >
          >Have a great time, I'm more than a little jealous.
          >
          >Mark
          >
          >
          >-----Original Message-----
          >From: Tighe1 [mailto:junk9191@...]
          >Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2002 6:12 PM
          >To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [ujeni] Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
          >
          >
          >
          >I have been accepted to teach math in Malawi and I'm leaving at the
          >end of this month! I'm super excited, especially reading all of this
          >group's messages. I'm a little confused about what to take for
          >clothing, especially considering the conservative nature of the
          >country. I was wondering if you guys could give me some pointers for
          >what is acceptable or not acceptable for a teacher. Basically, I've
          >been told that I need to wear pants and a button down shirt if I'm
          >around town, short sleeves are acceptable. In the classroom I need to
          >wear a long sleeved button down, and maybe a tie? Any pointers you
          >could give would be great.
          >
          >Also, do you have any general suggestions for items you should have
          >taken but didn't know about? Any suggestions are helpful, as I
          >obviously don't really know what to expect :) Thanks!
          >
          >-Tighe Herren
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >




          Life is too important to take seriously.
          - Corky Siegel


          _________________________________________________________________
          Join the world�s largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail.
          http://www.hotmail.com
        • Daniel Dudley
          I was a teacher in the the valley in Salima. I was too bloody hot to wear a tie, let alone a long sleeve shirt. However I also taught in the norther region
          Message 4 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002
            I was a teacher in the the valley in Salima. I was too bloody hot to wear a
            tie, let alone a long sleeve shirt. However I also taught in the norther
            region and in Lilongwe and from about April to about the end of July, it can
            get pretty chilly. Also I brought along several nice clothes for some
            special occasions. My advise in hind site would have to brought less clothes
            and more leisure things. I love golf, I wish that I had brought a club and
            a bunch of shag balls to hit and pay little kids to pick them up. My game
            went to pot in my 5 years in Malawi.

            You would be surprised at the used clothes that you can buy. A good pair of
            shoe or three is very important, a good watch, during my time I was pretty
            infamous for wearing flip-flops everywhere that I went, I hated how hard my
            socks got after washing them.

            My wife went back last summer, and she said that things have changed a lot
            especially in the capital. So it is hard for me to tell what you can or
            can't buy any more but my guess is that it is more than while I was there.

            Have fun, I love that little country and I know that they are having a tough
            time with the drought.

            If you have email while you are there, let us know where they send you, it
            would be nice to hear about old friends.

            Dan Dudley

            >From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@...>
            >Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
            >To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [ujeni] Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
            >Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2002 22:11:35 -0000
            >
            >
            >I have been accepted to teach math in Malawi and I'm leaving at the
            >end of this month! I'm super excited, especially reading all of this
            >group's messages. I'm a little confused about what to take for
            >clothing, especially considering the conservative nature of the
            >country. I was wondering if you guys could give me some pointers for
            >what is acceptable or not acceptable for a teacher. Basically, I've
            >been told that I need to wear pants and a button down shirt if I'm
            >around town, short sleeves are acceptable. In the classroom I need to
            >wear a long sleeved button down, and maybe a tie? Any pointers you
            >could give would be great.
            >
            >Also, do you have any general suggestions for items you should have
            >taken but didn't know about? Any suggestions are helpful, as I
            >obviously don't really know what to expect :) Thanks!
            >
            >-Tighe Herren
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/




            _________________________________________________________________
            Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com
          • holland@panasas.com
            Hey, Karl, no I never got any better. But you sure were happy I brought those bike tools! M ... From: Karl Klemmick [mailto:kleco_ksk@hotmail.com] Sent:
            Message 5 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002
              Hey, Karl, no I never got any better. But you sure were happy I brought those bike tools!

              M

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Karl Klemmick [mailto:kleco_ksk@...]
              Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 12:12 PM
              To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [ujeni] Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?



              Mark may have never regretted bringing a guitar, but being his flatmate I'm
              not sure I could say the same! Mark, did you ever master that poor thing?

              Cheers,

              Karl K.

              >From: holland@...
              >Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
              >To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: RE: [ujeni] Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
              >Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2002 18:33:06 -0400
              >
              >I wasn't a teacher but I did work in the government. In the office I wore
              >slacks, a short sleeve shirt or a long-sleeve one rolled up, and a tie most
              >days (man did I ever get sick of that blue shirt). I would often cycle in
              >wearing shorts & a t-shirt and then change in the office.
              >
              >Outside of the office my only rule for myself was to be neat, since I found
              >my interactions with people went much more smoothly that way. My sense of
              >the place is that Malawians dress formally if they can possibly afford it,
              >and find it slightly odd when someone who can afford to does not. That
              >said, in any very casual or expatriate situation I had no problem wearing
              >shorts and sandals.
              >
              >There used to be this great list that circulated called "things I'm really
              >glad I brought and things I wish I had left behind". First for me in the
              >former category was a tent, sleeping bag, and hiking boots. That opened up
              >some great vacation opportunities. Bike tools also. I had a kit of box
              >wrenches, screwdrivers, pliers and a few specialized bike tools (freewheel
              >puller, spoke wrench) which saved my butt on more than one occasion. It
              >wasn't huge: the whole thing fit in a zip-lock bag. Shoes were always
              >expensive and a hassle to find, so I'm glad I brought both dress shoes and
              >casual shoes. I never regretted bringing a guitar. It was a hassle to lug
              >around sometimes but it broke the ice with my homestay families
              >wonderfully. Everyone loved their shortwave radios. PC will provide you
              >with mosquito netting and a first-aid kit, or at least they did when I was
              >there.
              >
              >Have a great time, I'm more than a little jealous.
              >
              >Mark
              >
              >
              >-----Original Message-----
              >From: Tighe1 [mailto:junk9191@...]
              >Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2002 6:12 PM
              >To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [ujeni] Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
              >
              >
              >
              >I have been accepted to teach math in Malawi and I'm leaving at the
              >end of this month! I'm super excited, especially reading all of this
              >group's messages. I'm a little confused about what to take for
              >clothing, especially considering the conservative nature of the
              >country. I was wondering if you guys could give me some pointers for
              >what is acceptable or not acceptable for a teacher. Basically, I've
              >been told that I need to wear pants and a button down shirt if I'm
              >around town, short sleeves are acceptable. In the classroom I need to
              >wear a long sleeved button down, and maybe a tie? Any pointers you
              >could give would be great.
              >
              >Also, do you have any general suggestions for items you should have
              >taken but didn't know about? Any suggestions are helpful, as I
              >obviously don't really know what to expect :) Thanks!
              >
              >-Tighe Herren
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >




              Life is too important to take seriously.
              - Corky Siegel


              _________________________________________________________________
              Join the world's largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail.
              http://www.hotmail.com





              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • Tana Beverwyk
              Tighe- Some of my favorite clothes are ones I bought in the markets in Malawi! Yes, I still wear them (time to update?). As Mark suggested, I did love my
              Message 6 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002

                Tighe-

                Some of my favorite clothes are ones I bought in the markets in Malawi!  Yes, I still wear them (time to update?).  As Mark suggested, I did love my shortwave radio.  Also, nice lotions and smelly-stuff (perhaps a gendered item) was always nice to update the daily sponge bath.  Batteries were expensive and crummy in Malawi so bringing a stash for walkmans and radios is a good idea.  Don't underestimate the importance of a good camera- even if you're not into photography now, the beauty of Malawi will no doubt inspire you.  Sunscreen, film, chapstick, GOOD BOOKS!, favorite music, gifts for homestays and new friends, pictures of your family and home, dried spices.  I did have to explain the difference between my dried basil and marajuana one time at a military check-point, but after explaining how to make tomatoe sauce in my broken Tumbuka, I was fine.  If you have electricity it is great to have a laptop or wordprocessor.  I lived in the boonies with no electricity but kept an old word-processor at a friend's house in Mzuzu (the closest big city) and loved being able to get some work done when I was in town.  Oh the jealousy!  I feel it too!  Get ready for the trip of your life- Tana

                Our worst fear is not that we are inadequate.  Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure... It is our light, not our darkness that frightens us.  We ask ourselves: Who am I to be brillant, gorgeous, talented, or fabulous?  Well, actually, who are you not to be?"

                -Nelson Mandela

                >From: "Tighe1"
                >Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                >To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: [ujeni] Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
                >Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2002 22:11:35 -0000
                >
                >
                >I have been accepted to teach math in Malawi and I'm leaving at the
                >end of this month! I'm super excited, especially reading all of this
                >group's messages. I'm a little confused about what to take for
                >clothing, especially considering the conservative nature of the
                >country. I was wondering if you guys could give me some pointers for
                >what is acceptable or not acceptable for a teacher. Basically, I've
                >been told that I need to wear pants and a button down shirt if I'm
                >around town, short sleeves are acceptable. In the classroom I need to
                >wear a long sleeved button down, and maybe a tie? Any pointers you
                >could give would be great.
                >
                >Also, do you have any general suggestions for items you should have
                >taken but didn't know about? Any suggestions are helpful, as I
                >obviously don't really know what to expect :) Thanks!
                >
                >-Tighe Herren
                >
                >


                Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: Click Here
              • Christine Chumbler
                This reminded me of another standard piece of advice I give. Take *lots* of pictures when you get there of all the things that strike you as a little goofy,
                Message 7 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002
                  This reminded me of another standard piece of advice I give. Take
                  *lots* of pictures when you get there of all the things that strike you
                  as a little goofy, or just different from the states. It doesn't take
                  long for you to get used to these little things, and once you get back
                  you'll really wish you had a picture of, say, the Covo billboards "Even
                  mothers and daughters agree!"

                  I second (third, fourth?) the advice about not bringing many clothes.
                  And in addition to the little toys for kids, put a couple bottles of
                  bubbles in those tupperwares you'll be taking. My housemate Deb brought
                  a bottle and the bubbles were what broke the ice with the neighbor kids
                  who otherwise ran screaming from us.


                  >>> petitbeurre10@... 9/13/02 2:01 PM >>>

                  Tighe-
                  Some of my favorite clothes are ones I bought in the markets in Malawi!
                  Yes, I still wear them (time to update?). As Mark suggested, I did
                  love my shortwave radio. Also, nice lotions and smelly-stuff (perhaps a
                  gendered item) was always nice to update the daily sponge bath.
                  Batteries were expensive and crummy in Malawi so bringing a stash for
                  walkmans and radios is a good idea. Don't underestimate the importance
                  of a good camera- even if you're not into photography now, the beauty of
                  Malawi will no doubt inspire you. Sunscreen, film, chapstick, GOOD
                  BOOKS!, favorite music, gifts for homestays and new friends, pictures of
                  your family and home, dried spices. I did have to explain the
                  difference between my dried basil and marajuana one time at a military
                  check-point, but after explaining how to make tomatoe sauce in my broken
                  Tumbuka, I was fine. If you have electricity it is great to have a
                  laptop or wordprocessor. I lived in the boonies with no electricity but
                  kept an old word-processor at a friend's house in Mzuzu (the closest big
                  city) and loved being able to get some work done when I was in town. Oh
                  the jealousy! I feel it too! Get ready for the trip of your life-
                  Tana


                  Our worst fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that
                  we are powerful beyond measure... It is our light, not our darkness that
                  frightens us. We ask ourselves: Who am I to be brillant, gorgeous,
                  talented, or fabulous? Well, actually, who are you not to be?"
                  -Nelson Mandela



                  >From: "Tighe1"
                  >Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                  >To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: [ujeni] Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
                  >Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2002 22:11:35 -0000
                  >
                  >
                  >I have been accepted to teach math in Malawi and I'm leaving at the
                  >end of this month! I'm super excited, especially reading all of this
                  >group's messages. I'm a little confused about what to take for
                  >clothing, especially considering the conservative nature of the
                  >country. I was wondering if you guys could give me some pointers for
                  >what is acceptable or not acceptable for a teacher. Basically, I've
                  >been told that I need to wear pants and a button down shirt if I'm
                  >around town, short sleeves are acceptable. In the classroom I need to

                  >wear a long sleeved button down, and maybe a tie? Any pointers you
                  >could give would be great.
                  >
                  >Also, do you have any general suggestions for items you should have
                  >taken but didn't know about? Any suggestions are helpful, as I
                  >obviously don't really know what to expect :) Thanks!
                  >
                  >-Tighe Herren
                  >
                  >

                  Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: Click Here

                  Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                • Bill Eigel
                  Hi Tighe: My daughter, Bethany, is currently a Biology teacher in Kasinje. I have read all the responses to your request and, based on conversations I ve had
                  Message 8 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002
                    Hi Tighe:

                    My daughter, Bethany, is currently a Biology teacher
                    in Kasinje. I have read all the responses to your
                    request and, based on conversations I've had with
                    Bethany, I think you've received some great
                    suggestions. The only thing I would add is that she
                    took two collapsable water storage containers (most
                    camping supply stores carry) that she has found very
                    useful for storing boiled water in. The advice about
                    a tent and sleeping bag is very good; she uses those
                    in her travels constantly. As far as clothes are
                    concerned, depends on whether you end up in the
                    northern area or more southern. She took more clothes
                    for the northern area where it does get cold but ended
                    up in a very hot climate. She had no problem trading
                    some of her colder weather clothes with another PC
                    teacher; she also finds that buying clothes in the
                    markets works fine.

                    Have a great experience and say hello to Bethany
                    should you meet up with her.

                    Bill



                    --- Tighe1 <junk9191@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I have been accepted to teach math in Malawi and I'm
                    > leaving at the
                    > end of this month! I'm super excited, especially
                    > reading all of this
                    > group's messages. I'm a little confused about what
                    > to take for
                    > clothing, especially considering the conservative
                    > nature of the
                    > country. I was wondering if you guys could give me
                    > some pointers for
                    > what is acceptable or not acceptable for a teacher.
                    > Basically, I've
                    > been told that I need to wear pants and a button
                    > down shirt if I'm
                    > around town, short sleeves are acceptable. In the
                    > classroom I need to
                    > wear a long sleeved button down, and maybe a tie?
                    > Any pointers you
                    > could give would be great.
                    >
                    > Also, do you have any general suggestions for items
                    > you should have
                    > taken but didn't know about? Any suggestions are
                    > helpful, as I
                    > obviously don't really know what to expect :)
                    > Thanks!
                    >
                    > -Tighe Herren
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    __________________________________________________
                    Do you Yahoo!?
                    Yahoo! News - Today's headlines
                    http://news.yahoo.com
                  • Tighe1
                    Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought about the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the host family either!
                    Message 9 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002
                      Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought about
                      the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the host
                      family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few articles
                      of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                      people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy them
                      in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                      It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about investing
                      in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                      I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20 bucks.
                      I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)

                      Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all the
                      problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone says
                      the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I guess
                      you really can't ask for more.

                      I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous fits
                      I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to have
                      an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently it
                      still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet access I
                      will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within the
                      last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I just
                      assume that will be a once a month luxury?

                      -Tighe
                    • holland@panasas.com
                      Oh yeah, I forgot about that: a water purifier is a great idea. I had one and used it constantly when I travelled. Bring some extra cartridges for it. Mine
                      Message 10 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002
                        Oh yeah, I forgot about that: a water purifier is a great idea. I had one and used it constantly when I travelled. Bring some extra cartridges for it. Mine eventually started leaking badly and I had to pump twice as much for the same amount of water, but I still used it.

                        I lived in Lilongwe and had internet access whenever I had access to phone. There is/was a fascinating woman named Thandi Mbvundula who lives/lived in Lilongwe and runs/ran an internet service there called Epsilon and Omega (eomw.net). Their offices were at City Centre. Much preferable to MalawiNet (malawinet.com), which is/was owned and (poorly) run by a major political figure (now in the opposition I hear). While I was there MalawiNet had an officially sanctioned monopoly on internet access and forced E&O to use a crufty dialup linkage through South Africa. A friend of mine still uses E&O and I understand the laws have changed and they are now able to offer full service. (Did I hear a something about yet a third company opening recently somwhere in Blantyre?)

                        Dedza is a beautiful place. The view from the top of the mountain is spectacular, especially in rainy season when you can watch storms rolling across the plain. Cheesecake and Mzuzu coffee. Enough said.

                        Mark



                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Tighe1 [mailto:junk9191@...]
                        Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 3:19 PM
                        To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?



                        Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought about
                        the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the host
                        family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few articles
                        of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                        people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy them
                        in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                        It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about investing
                        in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                        I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20 bucks.
                        I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)

                        Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all the
                        problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone says
                        the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I guess
                        you really can't ask for more.

                        I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous fits
                        I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to have
                        an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently it
                        still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet access I
                        will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within the
                        last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I just
                        assume that will be a once a month luxury?

                        -Tighe





                        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      • Kristof & Stacia Nordin
                        A few notes about the previous suggestions from someone who has been here too long... - most PCVs get PC issued bikes, helmets, tool kits, bike maintenance
                        Message 11 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002
                          A few notes about the previous suggestions from someone who has been here
                          too long...

                          - most PCVs get PC issued bikes, helmets, tool kits, bike maintenance book,
                          mud flaps and a few other accessories. With that said, not all PCV teachers
                          get bikes because they generally live and work in the same place and don't
                          have the same transport needs as health or environment volunteers.

                          - definitely bring shoes and underware, they are still a pain to find, at
                          least
                          good ones. Bata Batas (flip flops are plentiful still though!)

                          - you can get a LOT here now, I picked up a braun 'milkshake mixer thingy'
                          to make baby food in new shop in Lilongwe (somewhere in the area of 30 US
                          dollars, which I'm sure would be 15 dollars there), although I can also buy
                          pureed baby food on a regular basis if I wanted.

                          - batteries STILL suck here and even the real everready type are old and
                          ridculously expensive

                          - i drink my water from protected water sources or out of the tap and
                          haven't had stomach problems in years (know on wood). i personally wouldn't
                          spend that much on a water filter!

                          - i read about a solar powered charger for a cell phone recently, i'm going
                          to look into buying that. i know a few current PCVs with cell phones (that
                          you have to buy here, in europe or south africa to get the right type to
                          work here). international calls come through pretty well, depending upon
                          where you are. it isn't anything I would buy until you see where you are in
                          the country though, not everywhere has cell phone service.

                          - internet - once a month is luxury. in dedza you will be in the villages
                          with a few breaks now and then - i wouldn't describe your training as having
                          a few modern luxuries execept for the first 1-3 days you arrive and stay
                          near the training office.

                          good luck!
                          Stacia

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@...>
                          To: <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 9:19 PM
                          Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?


                          >
                          > Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought about
                          > the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the host
                          > family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few articles
                          > of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                          > people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy them
                          > in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                          > It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about investing
                          > in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                          > I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20 bucks.
                          > I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)
                          >
                          > Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all the
                          > problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone says
                          > the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I guess
                          > you really can't ask for more.
                          >
                          > I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous fits
                          > I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to have
                          > an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently it
                          > still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet access I
                          > will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within the
                          > last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I just
                          > assume that will be a once a month luxury?
                          >
                          > -Tighe
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                          >
                          >
                        • Kristof & Stacia Nordin
                          More soundbites.... All PCVs also get water filters, not the type you can carry around though. The 3 cities all have Internet service, and I was just told
                          Message 12 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002
                            More soundbites.... All PCVs also get water filters, not the type you can
                            carry around though. The 3 cities all have Internet service, and I was just
                            told that Karonga now even has an internet cafe. There are several ISPs
                            now, maybe 5 or 6 that came in with the Leland initiative. I've used E&O
                            for 5 years, and Thandi did a wonderful presentation to a group of girls for
                            us one time. She's as great as ever. Unfortunately her husband died about
                            2, maybe 3? years ago, that always scares me... Dedza is beautiful and that
                            is where I went when I was waiting to go into labour for the whole month of
                            July. I got the en suite room at Ed's bar / forestry lodge for the month
                            and hiked around every day trying to induce labour (didn't work, but it was
                            beautiful!). Me, too, enough said. Gotta go to bed! Stacia

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: <holland@...>
                            To: <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 9:34 PM
                            Subject: RE: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?


                            > Oh yeah, I forgot about that: a water purifier is a great idea. I had one
                            and used it constantly when I travelled. Bring some extra cartridges for
                            it. Mine eventually started leaking badly and I had to pump twice as much
                            for the same amount of water, but I still used it.
                            >
                            > I lived in Lilongwe and had internet access whenever I had access to
                            phone. There is/was a fascinating woman named Thandi Mbvundula who
                            lives/lived in Lilongwe and runs/ran an internet service there called
                            Epsilon and Omega (eomw.net). Their offices were at City Centre. Much
                            preferable to MalawiNet (malawinet.com), which is/was owned and (poorly) run
                            by a major political figure (now in the opposition I hear). While I was
                            there MalawiNet had an officially sanctioned monopoly on internet access and
                            forced E&O to use a crufty dialup linkage through South Africa. A friend of
                            mine still uses E&O and I understand the laws have changed and they are now
                            able to offer full service. (Did I hear a something about yet a third
                            company opening recently somwhere in Blantyre?)
                            >
                            > Dedza is a beautiful place. The view from the top of the mountain is
                            spectacular, especially in rainy season when you can watch storms rolling
                            across the plain. Cheesecake and Mzuzu coffee. Enough said.
                            >
                            > Mark
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > -----Original Message-----
                            > From: Tighe1 [mailto:junk9191@...]
                            > Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 3:19 PM
                            > To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought about
                            > the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the host
                            > family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few articles
                            > of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                            > people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy them
                            > in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                            > It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about investing
                            > in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                            > I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20 bucks.
                            > I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)
                            >
                            > Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all the
                            > problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone says
                            > the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I guess
                            > you really can't ask for more.
                            >
                            > I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous fits
                            > I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to have
                            > an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently it
                            > still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet access I
                            > will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within the
                            > last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I just
                            > assume that will be a once a month luxury?
                            >
                            > -Tighe
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                            >
                            >
                          • Bell, Elizabeth
                            A few more; -a traveler s hammock (can get from camping catalogues) -seed packets for veggies and herbs to get some variety in your diet -freezer strength
                            Message 13 of 26 , Sep 13, 2002
                              A few more;

                              -a traveler's hammock (can get from camping catalogues)

                              -seed packets for veggies and herbs to get some variety in your diet

                              -freezer strength ziplock baggies in various sizes

                              -journal(s)

                              -sleep sheet

                              -good combination lock

                              -underclothes money belt

                              -credit card for emergencies and vacations

                              -ALOT of extra passport photos

                              and I couldn't agree more about tupperware - LOVED my Tupperware....

                              Safe Journey,
                              Liz
                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: Tighe1 [mailto:junk9191@...]
                              Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 3:19 PM
                              To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?


                              Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought about
                              the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the host
                              family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few articles
                              of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                              people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy them
                              in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                              It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about investing
                              in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                              I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20 bucks.
                              I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)

                              Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all the
                              problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone says
                              the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I guess
                              you really can't ask for more.

                              I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous fits
                              I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to have
                              an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently it
                              still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet access I
                              will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within the
                              last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I just
                              assume that will be a once a month luxury?

                              -Tighe





                              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                            • David Binkowski
                              Tighe, It sounds like you have received plenty of great ideas about what to bring on your trip. You re so lucky to be doing your training in Dedza. Perhaps my
                              Message 14 of 26 , Sep 14, 2002

                                Tighe,

                                It sounds like you have received plenty of great ideas about what to bring on your trip.  You're so lucky to be doing your training in Dedza.  Perhaps my opinion is biased, but I think I had the best post in the country.  I was a volunteer in Dedza for three years teaching math at Mchisu MCDE.  Unfortunately, all the teachers I worked with there have since moved on (I've even heard that one is in jail!).  If you get placed there, you won't be disappointed. 

                                You must hike the mountain (a relatively short hike) and then treat yourself to a slice of cheescake at the Pottery shop.  Good luck, enjoy your adventure, and keep us posted!!!

                                David Binkowski (94-97)

                                >From: "Tighe1"
                                >Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                                >To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                                >Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
                                >Date: Fri, 13 Sep 2002 19:19:07 -0000
                                >
                                >
                                >Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought about
                                >the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the host
                                >family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few articles
                                >of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                                >people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy them
                                >in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                                >It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about investing
                                >in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                                >I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20 bucks.
                                >I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)
                                >
                                >Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all the
                                >problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone says
                                >the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I guess
                                >you really can't ask for more.
                                >
                                >I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous fits
                                >I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to have
                                >an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently it
                                >still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet access I
                                >will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within the
                                >last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I just
                                >assume that will be a once a month luxury?
                                >
                                >-Tighe
                                >


                                MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos: Click Here
                              • Raymond R. Wise
                                Deb here. A watch??? who needs a watch to measure time in malawi? unless you have a watch that measures soon, soon-soon, now, and now-now, i might just pass
                                Message 15 of 26 , Sep 14, 2002
                                  Deb here. A watch??? who needs a watch to measure time in malawi? unless
                                  you have a watch that measures soon, soon-soon, now, and now-now, i might
                                  just pass on that one. unless, of course, you're really curious to know
                                  what time the 1:00 expressie actually departs!

                                  shoes. it's all about comortable shoes.

                                  hmmmmm. a purifier. we boiled, bleached, and strained the lumps out of our
                                  water with a hankie. and i still had the trots 75% of the time!


                                  Stoolie bwanji, y'all?
                                  __________________________________________________________________________
                                  Rand, Deb & Benjamin Wise
                                  2784 Mt. Olive Drive
                                  Decatur, GA 30033

                                  Email: rwise.psy88@...
                                  (404) 327-5765

                                  _______________________________________________________________________

                                  "It seemed the world was divided into good and bad people. The good ones
                                  slept better...while the bad ones seemed to enjoy the waking hours much more."
                                  - Woody Allen
                                • Daniel Dudley
                                  David, I had no idea that you were on this list, I stopped by Rey and Robin Sapaga s house about a month ago and you name came up in conversation, I was
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Sep 14, 2002
                                    David,
                                    I had no idea that you were on this list, I stopped by Rey and Robin
                                    Sapaga's house about a month ago and you name came up in conversation, I was
                                    wondering what happened to you.

                                    This is the first posting that I have seen from you. How about a catch up?

                                    Dan Dudley


                                    >From: "David Binkowski" <d_bink@...>
                                    >Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                                    >To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
                                    >Subject: Re: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
                                    >Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2002 07:10:49 +0000
                                    >




                                    _________________________________________________________________
                                    Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com
                                  • Vyrle Owens
                                    14 September 2002 Dear Tighe, Congratulations upon being accepted to Malawi Peace Corps. A truly profound experience awaits you. As to what to bring: In my
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Sep 14, 2002

                                      14 September 2002

                                       

                                      Dear Tighe,

                                       

                                      Congratulations upon being accepted to Malawi Peace Corps.  A truly profound experience awaits you.

                                       

                                      As to what to bring:  In my experience finding reasonable quality bed sheets and bath towels outside the US is expensive.  If you like either or both consider taking or shipping two flat sheets.  The really nice luxurious bath towels are just too good to wash by hand.  Try it before you pack to get the feel.  I think the lighter weight terry towels are good.

                                       

                                      Any other advice from me is probably suspect as I am too old and idealistic to be practical,

                                       

                                      But, just in case you want to listen for a moment

                                       

                                      Consider that if you arrived in Malawi with nothing more than what you were wearing and carrying (include a reasonable amount of traveler’s checks in the carrying) you would be just fine.  You would have a wonderful experience, you would very definitely live to tell about it (the camera and film helps here), and the Malawi people you meet would appreciate you just as much.  Your fellow Americans might think of you as eccentric but also be a little jealous.

                                       

                                      My best wishes to you and your fellow trainees.

                                       

                                      Stay well,

                                       

                                      Vyrle Owens

                                       

                                      .

                                    • Mary Parsaca
                                      Hi Tighe, As a PCV in Kenya 30+ years ago, I found my pressure cooker to be invaluable. When my daughter, Tana Beverwyk-Abouda, went to Malawi as a PCV she
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Sep 14, 2002
                                        Hi Tighe,
                                        As a PCV in Kenya 30+ years ago, I found my pressure cooker to be
                                        invaluable. When my daughter, Tana Beverwyk-Abouda, went to Malawi as a PCV
                                        she took one along and loved it. It's one way to conserve those fast
                                        disappearing trees in Malawi...faster cooking means less charcoal.
                                        Enjoy every minute.
                                        Mary
                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@...>
                                        To: <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
                                        Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 1:19 PM
                                        Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?


                                        >
                                        > Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought about
                                        > the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the host
                                        > family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few articles
                                        > of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                                        > people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy them
                                        > in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                                        > It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about investing
                                        > in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                                        > I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20 bucks.
                                        > I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)
                                        >
                                        > Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all the
                                        > problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone says
                                        > the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I guess
                                        > you really can't ask for more.
                                        >
                                        > I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous fits
                                        > I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to have
                                        > an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently it
                                        > still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet access I
                                        > will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within the
                                        > last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I just
                                        > assume that will be a once a month luxury?
                                        >
                                        > -Tighe
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                      • Tighe1
                                        As I don t have any real idea what my meals will consist of, I m intrigued with your suggestion. What would I be cooking that would possibly require a pressure
                                        Message 19 of 26 , Sep 14, 2002
                                          As I don't have any real idea what my meals will consist of, I'm
                                          intrigued with your suggestion. What would I be cooking that would
                                          possibly require a pressure cooker? Or is it just the fact that it
                                          will cook faster?

                                          -Tighe



                                          --- In ujeni@y..., "Mary Parsaca" <mparsaca@n...> wrote:
                                          > Hi Tighe,
                                          > As a PCV in Kenya 30+ years ago, I found my pressure cooker to be
                                          > invaluable. When my daughter, Tana Beverwyk-Abouda, went to Malawi
                                          as a PCV
                                          > she took one along and loved it. It's one way to conserve those fast
                                          > disappearing trees in Malawi...faster cooking means less charcoal.
                                          > Enjoy every minute.
                                          > Mary
                                          > ----- Original Message -----
                                          > From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@h...>
                                          > To: <ujeni@y...>
                                          > Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 1:19 PM
                                          > Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > >
                                          > > Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought
                                          about
                                          > > the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the
                                          host
                                          > > family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few
                                          articles
                                          > > of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                                          > > people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy
                                          them
                                          > > in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                                          > > It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about
                                          investing
                                          > > in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                                          > > I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20
                                          bucks.
                                          > > I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)
                                          > >
                                          > > Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all
                                          the
                                          > > problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone
                                          says
                                          > > the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I
                                          guess
                                          > > you really can't ask for more.
                                          > >
                                          > > I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous
                                          fits
                                          > > I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to
                                          have
                                          > > an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently
                                          it
                                          > > still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet
                                          access I
                                          > > will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within
                                          the
                                          > > last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I
                                          just
                                          > > assume that will be a once a month luxury?
                                          > >
                                          > > -Tighe
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                                          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                        • Kristof & Stacia Nordin
                                          As PCVs in Jamaica, we also loved our pressure cooker as beans were cooked very often. It would be great to have one here, too. Stacia ... From: Tighe1
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Sep 15, 2002
                                            As PCVs in Jamaica, we also loved our pressure cooker as beans were cooked
                                            very often. It would be great to have one here, too. Stacia

                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                            From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@...>
                                            To: <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
                                            Sent: Sunday, September 15, 2002 5:52 AM
                                            Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?


                                            > As I don't have any real idea what my meals will consist of, I'm
                                            > intrigued with your suggestion. What would I be cooking that would
                                            > possibly require a pressure cooker? Or is it just the fact that it
                                            > will cook faster?
                                            >
                                            > -Tighe
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > --- In ujeni@y..., "Mary Parsaca" <mparsaca@n...> wrote:
                                            > > Hi Tighe,
                                            > > As a PCV in Kenya 30+ years ago, I found my pressure cooker to be
                                            > > invaluable. When my daughter, Tana Beverwyk-Abouda, went to Malawi
                                            > as a PCV
                                            > > she took one along and loved it. It's one way to conserve those fast
                                            > > disappearing trees in Malawi...faster cooking means less charcoal.
                                            > > Enjoy every minute.
                                            > > Mary
                                            > > ----- Original Message -----
                                            > > From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@h...>
                                            > > To: <ujeni@y...>
                                            > > Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 1:19 PM
                                            > > Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought
                                            > about
                                            > > > the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the
                                            > host
                                            > > > family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few
                                            > articles
                                            > > > of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                                            > > > people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy
                                            > them
                                            > > > in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                                            > > > It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about
                                            > investing
                                            > > > in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                                            > > > I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20
                                            > bucks.
                                            > > > I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all
                                            > the
                                            > > > problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone
                                            > says
                                            > > > the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I
                                            > guess
                                            > > > you really can't ask for more.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous
                                            > fits
                                            > > > I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to
                                            > have
                                            > > > an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently
                                            > it
                                            > > > still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet
                                            > access I
                                            > > > will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within
                                            > the
                                            > > > last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I
                                            > just
                                            > > > assume that will be a once a month luxury?
                                            > > >
                                            > > > -Tighe
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                                            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                            >
                                            >
                                          • Kristof & Stacia Nordin
                                            Very true Vyrle - a Chitenje is about all you need around here! I would second your suggestion about sheets and towels if you want to have a bit of comfort
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Sep 15, 2002
                                               
                                              Very true Vyrle - a Chitenje is about all you need around here!  I would second your suggestion about sheets and towels if you want to have a bit of comfort from home.  I am going home in two weeks and am bringing some back.  Stacia
                                              ----- Original Message -----
                                              Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2002 9:43 PM
                                              Subject: RE: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?

                                              14 September 2002

                                               

                                              Dear Tighe,

                                               

                                              Congratulations upon being accepted to Malawi Peace Corps.  A truly profound experience awaits you.

                                               

                                              As to what to bring:  In my experience finding reasonable quality bed sheets and bath towels outside the US is expensive.  If you like either or both consider taking or shipping two flat sheets.  The really nice luxurious bath towels are just too good to wash by hand.  Try it before you pack to get the feel.  I think the lighter weight terry towels are good.

                                               

                                              Any other advice from me is probably suspect as I am too old and idealistic to be practical,

                                               

                                              But, just in case you want to listen for a moment

                                               

                                              Consider that if you arrived in Malawi with nothing more than what you were wearing and carrying (include a reasonable amount of traveler’s checks in the carrying) you would be just fine.  You would have a wonderful experience, you would very definitely live to tell about it (the camera and film helps here), and the Malawi people you meet would appreciate you just as much.  Your fellow Americans might think of you as eccentric but also be a little jealous.

                                               

                                              My best wishes to you and your fellow trainees.

                                               

                                              Stay well,

                                               

                                              Vyrle Owens

                                               

                                              .




                                              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                                            • Weber
                                              Hi Tighe, I m older than Vryle but though not as idealistic am still of that practical generation---you know, like your parents. My suggestion is to be
                                              Message 22 of 26 , Sep 15, 2002
                                                Hi Tighe, I'm older than Vryle but though not as idealistic am still of that
                                                practical generation---you know, like your parents. My suggestion is to be
                                                prepared to enter into and soak up an experience the likes of which you
                                                can't even begin to fathom. The suggestions regarding items to make your day
                                                to day living more bearable are right on. You should, however, think in
                                                terms of adapting to the lifestyles of those with whom you'll be living on a
                                                daily basis. That means electronic do-dads which might make it easier to
                                                have contact with the "outside" world could diminish the quality of the
                                                Malawian experience and set you apart from others especially if you are in a
                                                rural area. Of course, as others have suggested, there likely won't be
                                                electricity or limited access to it.

                                                Peace Corps encourages you to blend in as much as possible so that is why
                                                you are paid in Kwacha instead of Dollars and provides you with a minimal
                                                monthly stipend. Before you know it you'll be complaining about not being
                                                able to afford a favorite food, soda or beer around the last of the month or
                                                even the 1st of the month, but then, look around you and you'll discover
                                                many Malawians can't afford their "favorites" hardly ever. It's humbling.

                                                You asked about foods. During our training we had a great practical session
                                                where we were dropped off at local markets with "X" amount of kwacha and
                                                then expected to buy 3 items within budget. The next day we cooked village
                                                style. I always felt that was one of the best sessions as it made going to
                                                market less intimidating after that. Most, if not all, volunteers had
                                                workers who did buying and cooking for them. It did make it easier. I
                                                cheated. I brought my own cook from the U.S. with me; my wife and fellow
                                                volunteer Cathy. She often sent me to the "store" however because she felt I
                                                had better bargaining prowess (At least that's what she led me to believe
                                                when I trekked to the Limbe Market).

                                                The reason you are getting many responses is because we all are vicariously
                                                reliving a defining moment in our lives. You are going to have good times
                                                and bad times but in the end, the time of your life. Let yourself enjoy it.
                                                Don Weber, Class of 94-96.

                                                -----Original Message-----
                                                From: Tighe1 <junk9191@...>
                                                To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
                                                Date: Saturday, September 14, 2002 8:52 PM
                                                Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?


                                                >As I don't have any real idea what my meals will consist of, I'm
                                                >intrigued with your suggestion. What would I be cooking that would
                                                >possibly require a pressure cooker? Or is it just the fact that it
                                                >will cook faster?
                                                >
                                                >-Tighe
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >--- In ujeni@y..., "Mary Parsaca" <mparsaca@n...> wrote:
                                                >> Hi Tighe,
                                                >> As a PCV in Kenya 30+ years ago, I found my pressure cooker to be
                                                >> invaluable. When my daughter, Tana Beverwyk-Abouda, went to Malawi
                                                >as a PCV
                                                >> she took one along and loved it. It's one way to conserve those fast
                                                >> disappearing trees in Malawi...faster cooking means less charcoal.
                                                >> Enjoy every minute.
                                                >> Mary
                                                >> ----- Original Message -----
                                                >> From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@h...>
                                                >> To: <ujeni@y...>
                                                >> Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 1:19 PM
                                                >> Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
                                                >>
                                                >>
                                                >> >
                                                >> > Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought
                                                >about
                                                >> > the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the
                                                >host
                                                >> > family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few
                                                >articles
                                                >> > of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                                                >> > people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy
                                                >them
                                                >> > in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                                                >> > It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about
                                                >investing
                                                >> > in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                                                >> > I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20
                                                >bucks.
                                                >> > I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)
                                                >> >
                                                >> > Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all
                                                >the
                                                >> > problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone
                                                >says
                                                >> > the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I
                                                >guess
                                                >> > you really can't ask for more.
                                                >> >
                                                >> > I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous
                                                >fits
                                                >> > I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to
                                                >have
                                                >> > an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently
                                                >it
                                                >> > still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet
                                                >access I
                                                >> > will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within
                                                >the
                                                >> > last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I
                                                >just
                                                >> > assume that will be a once a month luxury?
                                                >> >
                                                >> > -Tighe
                                                >> >
                                                >> >
                                                >> >
                                                >> >
                                                >> >
                                                >> > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                                                >http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                                >> >
                                                >> >
                                                >> >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                                >
                                                >
                                              • Mary Parsaca
                                                A pressure cooker gets those beans done in a hurry and turns shoe leather masquerading as meat into something quite edible. (It also ensures the death of any
                                                Message 23 of 26 , Sep 15, 2002
                                                  A pressure cooker gets those beans done in a hurry and turns shoe leather
                                                  masquerading as meat into something quite edible. (It also ensures the death
                                                  of any parasites lurking in the meat!) I remember our first chicken in
                                                  Kenya. It was tiny, so I thought, young and tender. What a joke! It was
                                                  fried to perfection, but we were unable to sink our teeth into it. Into the
                                                  pressure cooker it went. In half an hour it was quite wonderful although not
                                                  exactly crispy.

                                                  Mary

                                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                                  From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@...>
                                                  To: <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
                                                  Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2002 9:52 PM
                                                  Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?


                                                  > As I don't have any real idea what my meals will consist of, I'm
                                                  > intrigued with your suggestion. What would I be cooking that would
                                                  > possibly require a pressure cooker? Or is it just the fact that it
                                                  > will cook faster?
                                                  >
                                                  > -Tighe
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > --- In ujeni@y..., "Mary Parsaca" <mparsaca@n...> wrote:
                                                  > > Hi Tighe,
                                                  > > As a PCV in Kenya 30+ years ago, I found my pressure cooker to be
                                                  > > invaluable. When my daughter, Tana Beverwyk-Abouda, went to Malawi
                                                  > as a PCV
                                                  > > she took one along and loved it. It's one way to conserve those fast
                                                  > > disappearing trees in Malawi...faster cooking means less charcoal.
                                                  > > Enjoy every minute.
                                                  > > Mary
                                                  > > ----- Original Message -----
                                                  > > From: "Tighe1" <junk9191@h...>
                                                  > > To: <ujeni@y...>
                                                  > > Sent: Friday, September 13, 2002 1:19 PM
                                                  > > Subject: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > > Wow, you guys rock. So many good suggestions. I never thought
                                                  > about
                                                  > > > the bike repair kit. I never thought about bringing toys for the
                                                  > host
                                                  > > > family either! Awesome. I suppose I'll just throw in a few
                                                  > articles
                                                  > > > of clothing and fill the rest with stuff. One thing that several
                                                  > > > people have suggested is a handheld water purifier. You can buy
                                                  > them
                                                  > > > in camping stores, but the one they recommend for africa is $200.
                                                  > > > It's still super small, just expensive. I'm thinking about
                                                  > investing
                                                  > > > in one. Books and music are definitely on the top of my list, and
                                                  > > > I've even found a solar powered battery recharger for about 20
                                                  > bucks.
                                                  > > > I guess I'm screwed in the rainy season though :)
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > > Hearing all of your enthusiasm is really encouraging. Despite all
                                                  > the
                                                  > > > problems, I thought the country looked pretty inviting. Everyone
                                                  > says
                                                  > > > the people are super friendly and the country is beautiful. I
                                                  > guess
                                                  > > > you really can't ask for more.
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > > I leave staging on Oct. 1 for Malawi. Surprisingly, the nervous
                                                  > fits
                                                  > > > I had months ago have turned into pure excitement. I'm ready to
                                                  > have
                                                  > > > an adventure! I'm doing my training in Dedza (sp?) and apparently
                                                  > it
                                                  > > > still has a few modern conveniences. So, if I have internet
                                                  > access I
                                                  > > > will most certainly post. Did anyone who did their service within
                                                  > the
                                                  > > > last couple of years have regular internet access? Or should I
                                                  > just
                                                  > > > assume that will be a once a month luxury?
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > > -Tighe
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                                                  > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > >
                                                  > > >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                • Weber
                                                  Stacia... I didn t know you were PCVs in Jamaica. After Peace Corps I volunteered there through Health Volunteers Overseas for 6 weeks with a community based
                                                  Message 24 of 26 , Sep 15, 2002
                                                    Stacia...

                                                    I didn't know you were PCVs in Jamaica. After Peace Corps I volunteered
                                                    there through Health Volunteers Overseas for 6 weeks with a community based
                                                    rehabilitation program (3D Project). I met a man PCV in Morant Bay who was
                                                    doing some small business projects with mothers of some of the disabled kids
                                                    out of the 3D Project office there. I worked half the time in Morant Bay
                                                    and then in Highgate where they also had a 3D Project office. I went (bus,
                                                    taxi??? and then walk) with community rehab workers out to rural homes of
                                                    disabled kids. Though really a less poor country than Malawi I felt the
                                                    depth of poverty more there...maybe because sense of community seemed less.
                                                    Possibly it was just because I was there a short time and didn't get to know
                                                    people and correctly interpret what I was experiencing.

                                                    One of those funny serendipitous things happened. I met an American family
                                                    when I went to church with the Jamaican family I was living with in
                                                    Highgate. The American woman offered me a ride to work when she spotted me
                                                    on the road a day or so later. I almost refused...I was close to work and
                                                    liked the walk (not nearly as much as my walk to work in Malawi where
                                                    everyone wanted to walk with me and talk). Decided it was kind of her to
                                                    ask so accepted. In asking about where she was from...learned that they
                                                    were Mennonites, hadn't lived in the U.S. for many years. Her husband was
                                                    running the Habitat for Humanities office in Highgate, but they had been in
                                                    Zambia before, had traveled to Blantyre and stayed at the Salvation Army
                                                    place in Blantyre because in Zambia they worked at the Salvation Army
                                                    Hospital. I told her that Margaret Wazakili, my closest friend in Blantyre,
                                                    had worked there in Zambia as a physiotherapist. She said "Oh my goodness,
                                                    Maggie! We lost track of her!" They were friends and lived as neighbors on
                                                    the hospital grounds. Anyway, they had been in Jamaica for a year and still
                                                    had the same sense of the difference between Jamaica and our experiences in
                                                    southern Africa.

                                                    A few Jamaican mothers at a 3D Project parents meeting were talking about
                                                    how they don't show their children enough affection, how they don't hug.
                                                    I'd really be interested in hearing your about your experiences there. I
                                                    may go back sometime. After going I helped recruit and prepare other
                                                    therapists to go and have kept in email touch with some who I've never met
                                                    and with the women who started 3D. She's retired and the project is falling
                                                    apart because of lack of funding. UNICEF funds projects for a certain
                                                    number of years and expects them to develop their own funding sources, from
                                                    what I understand. Disabled kids' rehab. programs are seem to be low on the
                                                    list of government funding priorities and probably even most NGO's, though
                                                    Malawi Against Polio has done well through Dutch NGO's and Christofer
                                                    Blinden (sp??? German NGO?), hasn't it? Still hope that's well in place.

                                                    Cathy




                                                    -----Original Message-----
                                                    From: Kristof & Stacia Nordin <nordin@...>
                                                    To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
                                                    Date: Sunday, September 15, 2002 2:16 AM
                                                    Subject: Re: [ujeni] Re: Help! Suggestions for to-be trainee?


                                                    >As PCVs in Jamaica, we also loved our pressure cooker as beans were cooked
                                                    >very often. It would be great to have one here, too. Stacia
                                                    >
                                                  • wanderingdisc
                                                    Tighe I ll be headed on over to Malawi with you as a science teacher. Where did you find the solar powered battery charger? And why was only one type of pump
                                                    Message 25 of 26 , Sep 20, 2002
                                                      Tighe

                                                      I'll be headed on over to Malawi with you as a science teacher.
                                                      Where did you find the solar powered battery charger? And why was
                                                      only one type of pump recommended for Afica? What are some of the
                                                      specifications that I need to check for? I already have a pump, and
                                                      I'll bring it if is appropriate for Africa.

                                                      Does anyone have an email address for Tom & Ruth Nighswander? I was
                                                      classmates with their daughter Heather back in high school. Small
                                                      world now that I'm headed to Malawi.

                                                      Ty
                                                    • Eric Bone
                                                      Timoneni mose! Here are a few highlights from the year: In January, Jacqui and I resumed cohabitating after 15 months apart. During that time she had been
                                                      Message 26 of 26 , Dec 2, 2004
                                                        Timoneni mose!  Here are a few highlights from the year:
                                                         
                                                        In January, Jacqui and I resumed cohabitating after 15 months apart.  During that time she had been working in San Francisco and DC while I was finishing my math PhD at Brandeis University near Boston.  I finished in December and moved to DC in January to begin a 4 month stint at the National Academy of Sciences as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow (see http://www7.nationalacademies.org/policyfellows/).  I worked in the Office of International Affairs putting together websites and brochures about science advisory and development activities that the Academies undertake around the world. In fact, the website just went up at http://www.nationalacademies.org/international/, though not all the links seem to working yet.
                                                         
                                                        Jacqui left her job at American Councils for International Education soon after I finished my internship, and we took advantage of the time to travel.  We got to see Rand and Deb in Atlanta in June and several former northern volunteers at a gathering in North Carolina in August.  (I'll let our amazing hostess and organizer Stephanie Jayne fill you in on that one).   In between we spent a month in South Korea, traveling around the country and visiting more than 30(!) of my in-laws. 
                                                         
                                                        In the fall Jacqui began a new job managing nonproliferation programs at the US Civilian Research and Development Foundation (www.crdf.org).  I began a one-to-two-year fellowship through the American Assocation for the Advancement of Science (see http://fellowships.aaas.org/) at the State Department.  I am working in the Office of the Coordinator of US Assistance to Europe and Eurasia (www.state.gov/p/eur/ace).  My job is to connect and coordinate people involved in all sorts of security assistance programs, especially those that involve putting former Soviet weapons scientists to work in non-threatening situations.
                                                         
                                                        I always enjoy hearing people's updates, so I hope more people will find time to write.
                                                         
                                                        Jani umampha,
                                                        Eric Bone
                                                        Chintheche 1995-97


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