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Pearl Harbor for the 21st century

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  • Eric Bone
    We suffer from an act of war without any enemy nation with which to do battle. That s from a NY Times article:
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 12, 2001
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      "We suffer from an act of war without any enemy nation with
      which to do battle."

      That's from a NY Times article:
      http://www.nytimes.com/2001/09/12/opinion/12WED1.html

      60 years ago, what did people think the day after Pearl Harbor? It seems
      clear now that it was time for anyone eligible to join the army to fight
      WW2. Was that so clear at the time? It seems so.

      So now we have a Pearl Harbor, where the planes are our own turned against
      us; where the enemy is unclear; where there's no "war" already going on for
      us to join. So what is the right thing to do now? Do we continue our
      "normal lives?" Or is the right thing for us to "sign up for the war," as
      they did 60 years ago. What would "signing up" mean?

      I am disturbed, and perhaps unclear. I feel like our lives changed
      yesterday, but I don't know what that change was.

      Eric
    • Tana Beverwyk
      The same media that brought us the pictures of a collapsing World Trade Center shows us the civilians who live in the same places that terrorists may dwell,
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 12, 2001
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        "The same media that brought us the pictures of a collapsing World Trade Center shows us the civilians who live in the same places that terrorists may dwell, whose lives are just as ordinary and just as precious as the ones that we have lost" (NYT).  THAT'S where so much of my pain and confusion comes from.  Thanks for the article, Eric.

        >From: Eric Bone
        >Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
        >To:
        >Subject: [ujeni] Pearl Harbor for the 21st century
        >Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2001 15:30:31 -0400 (EDT)
        >
        >"We suffer from an act of war without any enemy nation with
        >which to do battle."
        >
        >That's from a NY Times article:
        >http://www.nytimes.com/2001/09/12/opinion/12WED1.html
        >
        >60 years ago, what did people think the day after Pearl Harbor? It seems
        >clear now that it was time for anyone eligible to join the army to fight
        >WW2. Was that so clear at the time? It seems so.
        >
        >So now we have a Pearl Harbor, where the planes are our own turned against
        >us; where the enemy is unclear; where there's no "war" already going on for
        >us to join. So what is the right thing to do now? Do we continue our
        >"normal lives?" Or is the right thing for us to "sign up for the war," as
        >they did 60 years ago. What would "signing up" mean?
        >
        >I am disturbed, and perhaps unclear. I feel like our lives changed
        >yesterday, but I don't know what that change was.
        >
        >Eric
        >


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      • Vyrle Owens
        12 September 2001 Dear Eric, et. al., Pogo said it many years ago, but repeating it seems trite at the moment. I think we lost another degree of innocence on
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 12, 2001
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          12 September 2001

          Dear Eric, et. al.,

          Pogo said it many years ago, but repeating it seems trite at the moment.

          I think we lost another degree of innocence on Tuesday. Where to go next I
          know not.

          When I was a little kid we had bomb drills and other civil defence training
          but that went away in the 60's along with the sale of bomb shelters and
          extension service bulletins about radioactive fallout on pastures, in milk,
          and food crops.

          And now some clever, dedicated, persons have taken our own big toys, which
          we have so much fun flying around the sky and used them to destroy another
          symbol of our hope and innocence, and of course our arrogance. But the
          real attack was personal. Not only against the United States but also
          against all the nations of the world whose citizens worked in the WTC. The
          intent was probably symbolic. The impact is quite personal.

          What kind of civil defense training will we do now? Will we all become
          "anti-terrorists"?

          Probably nothing and probably not, unless we take it upon ourselves to
          become more aware and able to act or react appropriately.

          The definition of "normal" has probably changed a bit, but we will probably
          go on living our new "normal" lives and hope our children or grandchildren
          will be able to live a full life in peace and prosperity. That is what my
          parents and their friends wanted. Their normal life changed with WW II and
          they prayed for peace for their children and grandchildren. We will do the
          same. I feel fortunate to have lived a good life since my birth at the
          close of WW Two. Not so prosperous but certainly quite innocent and
          untainted by the threat of violence.

          While there are a great number of the people of this country who have been
          in war or other threatening situations there are also a very significant
          number of us who really do not know what it is all about. For those who
          came to this country to escape terror and violence and those warriors here
          who never wanted to be so and hoped never to become so again, this is
          probably another episode of disappointment (among other things depending
          upon their personal experience). For the rest of us it is a learning
          opportunity, with all due respect for those who grieve and mourn great
          personal loss.

          Disturbed and unclear describes it very well.

          Vyrle

          On the other hand "waging peace" is probably the better option than "waging
          war."

          ----------
          > From: Eric Bone <bone@...>
          > To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [ujeni] Pearl Harbor for the 21st century
          > Date: Wednesday, 12 September, 2001 12:30 PM
          >
          > "We suffer from an act of war without any enemy nation with
          > which to do battle."
          >
          > That's from a NY Times article:
          > http://www.nytimes.com/2001/09/12/opinion/12WED1.html
          >
          > 60 years ago, what did people think the day after Pearl Harbor? It seems
          > clear now that it was time for anyone eligible to join the army to fight
          > WW2. Was that so clear at the time? It seems so.
          >
          > So now we have a Pearl Harbor, where the planes are our own turned
          against
          > us; where the enemy is unclear; where there's no "war" already going on
          for
          > us to join. So what is the right thing to do now? Do we continue our
          > "normal lives?" Or is the right thing for us to "sign up for the war,"
          as
          > they did 60 years ago. What would "signing up" mean?
          >
          > I am disturbed, and perhaps unclear. I feel like our lives changed
          > yesterday, but I don't know what that change was.
          >
          > Eric
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

          >
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