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Doctors Without Borders

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  • Weber
    Hey Paul, What do you know about the spending record of Doctors Without Borders? We give anyway so maybe we don t want to be disillusioned. I think I m
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 27 10:44 AM
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      Hey Paul,  What do you know about the spending record of Doctors Without Borders?   We give anyway so maybe we don't want to be disillusioned.
       
      I think I'm sending copyrighted material.  What's the rules on emailing copyrighted stuff, anyone know?  And, if anyone is interested this UN Newsletter site is a great (it can come via email daily on weekdays).  It has lots of stuff on Africa, on HIV/AIDS, other health issues including polio,etc, as well as environment; economics,trade and development; education, science and culture; humanitarian and food security.     
       
      To subscribe, visit the UN Wire Web site at:
      http://www.unfoundation.org/unwirelogin/unf_listadmin.cfm
      and enter your email address.

        HIV/AIDS: Medecins Sans Frontieres Accepts Cipla
        Drugs Offer
        
      26 Feb 2001               Section: Health
       
             Medecins Sans Frontieres has agreed to take Indian drug company Cipla up
        on its offer to supply generic triple-therapy drug "cocktails" for $350 per patient
        annually, which the organization will then distribute free in 10 countries.
             Cipla also offered to sell the triple-combination therapy drugs to
        governments for $600 per patient instead of the $10,000 to $15,000 charged in
        the United States and Europe.
             "In general, where the Cipla drug will be used, it will be supplied free of
        cost," Daniel Berman of Medecins Sans Frontieres' Access to Essential
        Medicines campaign said Friday. "Wherever it is purchased by governments, it
        would be sold at reduced prices."
             Berman said distribution of the drugs will begin in coming months, and while
        he wouldn't name the 10 countries, he said the program is under way in
        Thailand and Cameroon (Chicago Tribune, 25 Feb).
             A Cipla-Medecins Sans Frontieres statement said developing country
        governments "can immediately take advantage of the offer" adding that the offer
        "is available without restrictions in time, geography or quantity" (Ramola Talwar
        Badam, Associated Press/Boston Globe, 24 Feb).
             Meanwhile, two US pharmaceutical companies -- Bristol-Myers Squibb and
        Pfizer -- appear to be considering Cipla's offer to pay them 5% royalties in
        exchange for licenses to sell knockoffs of those companies' patented anti-AIDS
        drugs in developing countries, the Wall Street Journal reports.
             A New York Times editorial praises Cipla's recent offer, calling it "a step
        toward commuting the death sentences now hanging over the 25 million
        Africans infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS."
             The editorial also says that the offer "has greatly increased the possibility that
        poor nations will be able to treat AIDS, especially if it provokes brand-name
        drug makers to lower their prices, as it seems to be doing."
             Even at the $600 price tag for governments, though, the editorial warns that
        these drugs are still out of reach for most Africans, and says that wealthy nations
        will need to step up efforts in continuing to help Africa, in particular helping
        "African nations improve their health care delivery systems so they can properly
        administer these drugs -- an effort that would reap many other health benefits as
        well" (New York Times, 25 Feb).
             A Chennai Hindu editorial says that "the global pharmaceutical industry is
        unlikely to be the same after the dramatic offer by the Indian firm Cipla."
        Quoting Cipla's joint managing director Amar Lulla as saying "as the volumes
        get larger, prices could fall even further," the editorial says that "this is almost
        certain to happen now that Ranbaxy, another Indian pharma major, has
        announced that it will start production of anti-retroviral drugs" to suppress HIV
        (Chennai Hindu, 23 Feb).
        
         
       
       
        © 2001 by National Journal Group Inc., 1501 M St., N.W., Washington, DC 20005.
       
        UN Wire is a free service sponsored by the United Nations Foundation and its sister
        organization, the Better World Fund, which are dedicated to supporting United Nations
        efforts on behalf of the environment, population stabilization and children's health. UN
        Wire is produced independently by National Journal Group. For the latest information and
        updates on UN Foundation activities, visit us on the web at http://www.unfoundation.org.
       
       
    • Bell, Elizabeth
      msf s utilization of funds is quite good, one of the best. the percentage of their funds that are spent on admin and overhead costs is quite small and well
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 27 1:10 PM
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        msf's utilization of funds is quite good, one of the best. the percentage
        of their funds that are spent on admin and overhead costs is quite small and
        well below the non-profit/charity standard.

        and they won the 1999 nobel peace prize....

        for more info:
        http://www.msf.org/

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Paul DEVER [mailto:pcpaul@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, February 27, 2001 2:55 PM
        To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [ujeni] Doctors Without Borders


        Not bad as a group, and they do go where no one esle will...this can be seen

        in Chechnya where they just released that doctor...


        all organizations have their own agendas, so be careful where you let the
        money go.

        THere is an obscure charity in DC called the Pau led Ever fund, and you can

        make those checks out to Pau Led Ever. Maling address is:

        Pau Led Ever DFOundation for Various and Sundry Chairities of choice
        3000 S Randolph St
        Suite 101
        Arlington, VA 22206

        Contributions are not tax deductible.


        ----Original Message Follows----
        From: "Weber" <weber@...>
        Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
        To: <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [ujeni] Doctors Without Borders
        Date: Tue, 27 Feb 2001 10:44:45 -0800

        Hey Paul, What do you know about the spending record of Doctors Without
        Borders? We give anyway so maybe we don't want to be disillusioned.

        I think I'm sending copyrighted material. What's the rules on emailing
        copyrighted stuff, anyone know? And, if anyone is interested this UN
        Newsletter site is a great (it can come via email daily on weekdays). It
        has lots of stuff on Africa, on HIV/AIDS, other health issues including
        polio,etc, as well as environment; economics,trade and development;
        education, science and culture; humanitarian and food security.

        To subscribe, visit the UN Wire Web site at:
        http://www.unfoundation.org/unwirelogin/unf_listadmin.cfm
        and enter your email address.

        HIV/AIDS: Medecins Sans Frontieres Accepts Cipla
        Drugs Offer
        26 Feb 2001 Section: Health

        Medecins Sans Frontieres has agreed to take Indian drug company
        Cipla up
        on its offer to supply generic triple-therapy drug "cocktails" for $350
        per patient
        annually, which the organization will then distribute free in 10
        countries.
        Cipla also offered to sell the triple-combination therapy drugs to
        governments for $600 per patient instead of the $10,000 to $15,000
        charged in
        the United States and Europe.
        "In general, where the Cipla drug will be used, it will be supplied
        free of
        cost," Daniel Berman of Medecins Sans Frontieres' Access to Essential
        Medicines campaign said Friday. "Wherever it is purchased by governments,

        it
        would be sold at reduced prices."
        Berman said distribution of the drugs will begin in coming months,
        and while
        he wouldn't name the 10 countries, he said the program is under way in
        Thailand and Cameroon (Chicago Tribune, 25 Feb).
        A Cipla-Medecins Sans Frontieres statement said developing country
        governments "can immediately take advantage of the offer" adding that the

        offer
        "is available without restrictions in time, geography or quantity"
        (Ramola Talwar
        Badam, Associated Press/Boston Globe, 24 Feb).
        Meanwhile, two US pharmaceutical companies -- Bristol-Myers Squibb
        and
        Pfizer -- appear to be considering Cipla's offer to pay them 5% royalties

        in
        exchange for licenses to sell knockoffs of those companies' patented
        anti-AIDS
        drugs in developing countries, the Wall Street Journal reports.
        A New York Times editorial praises Cipla's recent offer, calling it
        "a step
        toward commuting the death sentences now hanging over the 25 million
        Africans infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS."
        The editorial also says that the offer "has greatly increased the
        possibility that
        poor nations will be able to treat AIDS, especially if it provokes
        brand-name
        drug makers to lower their prices, as it seems to be doing."
        Even at the $600 price tag for governments, though, the editorial
        warns that
        these drugs are still out of reach for most Africans, and says that
        wealthy nations
        will need to step up efforts in continuing to help Africa, in particular
        helping
        "African nations improve their health care delivery systems so they can
        properly
        administer these drugs -- an effort that would reap many other health
        benefits as
        well" (New York Times, 25 Feb).
        A Chennai Hindu editorial says that "the global pharmaceutical
        industry is
        unlikely to be the same after the dramatic offer by the Indian firm
        Cipla."
        Quoting Cipla's joint managing director Amar Lulla as saying "as the
        volumes
        get larger, prices could fall even further," the editorial says that
        "this is almost
        certain to happen now that Ranbaxy, another Indian pharma major, has
        announced that it will start production of anti-retroviral drugs" to
        suppress HIV
        (Chennai Hindu, 23 Feb).




        © 2001 by National Journal Group Inc., 1501 M St., N.W., Washington, DC
        20005.

        UN Wire is a free service sponsored by the United Nations Foundation and
        its sister
        organization, the Better World Fund, which are dedicated to supporting
        United Nations
        efforts on behalf of the environment, population stabilization and
        children's health. UN
        Wire is produced independently by National Journal Group. For the latest
        information and
        updates on UN Foundation activities, visit us on the web at
        http://www.unfoundation.org



        _________________________________________________________________
        Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com




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      • Paul DEVER
        Not bad as a group, and they do go where no one esle will...this can be seen in Chechnya where they just released that doctor... all organizations have their
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 27 7:54 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Not bad as a group, and they do go where no one esle will...this can be seen
          in Chechnya where they just released that doctor...


          all organizations have their own agendas, so be careful where you let the
          money go.

          THere is an obscure charity in DC called the Pau led Ever fund, and you can
          make those checks out to Pau Led Ever. Maling address is:

          Pau Led Ever DFOundation for Various and Sundry Chairities of choice
          3000 S Randolph St
          Suite 101
          Arlington, VA 22206

          Contributions are not tax deductible.


          ----Original Message Follows----
          From: "Weber" <weber@...>
          Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
          To: <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: [ujeni] Doctors Without Borders
          Date: Tue, 27 Feb 2001 10:44:45 -0800

          Hey Paul, What do you know about the spending record of Doctors Without
          Borders? We give anyway so maybe we don't want to be disillusioned.

          I think I'm sending copyrighted material. What's the rules on emailing
          copyrighted stuff, anyone know? And, if anyone is interested this UN
          Newsletter site is a great (it can come via email daily on weekdays). It
          has lots of stuff on Africa, on HIV/AIDS, other health issues including
          polio,etc, as well as environment; economics,trade and development;
          education, science and culture; humanitarian and food security.

          To subscribe, visit the UN Wire Web site at:
          http://www.unfoundation.org/unwirelogin/unf_listadmin.cfm
          and enter your email address.

          HIV/AIDS: Medecins Sans Frontieres Accepts Cipla
          Drugs Offer
          26 Feb 2001 Section: Health

          Medecins Sans Frontieres has agreed to take Indian drug company
          Cipla up
          on its offer to supply generic triple-therapy drug "cocktails" for $350
          per patient
          annually, which the organization will then distribute free in 10
          countries.
          Cipla also offered to sell the triple-combination therapy drugs to
          governments for $600 per patient instead of the $10,000 to $15,000
          charged in
          the United States and Europe.
          "In general, where the Cipla drug will be used, it will be supplied
          free of
          cost," Daniel Berman of Medecins Sans Frontieres' Access to Essential
          Medicines campaign said Friday. "Wherever it is purchased by governments,
          it
          would be sold at reduced prices."
          Berman said distribution of the drugs will begin in coming months,
          and while
          he wouldn't name the 10 countries, he said the program is under way in
          Thailand and Cameroon (Chicago Tribune, 25 Feb).
          A Cipla-Medecins Sans Frontieres statement said developing country
          governments "can immediately take advantage of the offer" adding that the
          offer
          "is available without restrictions in time, geography or quantity"
          (Ramola Talwar
          Badam, Associated Press/Boston Globe, 24 Feb).
          Meanwhile, two US pharmaceutical companies -- Bristol-Myers Squibb
          and
          Pfizer -- appear to be considering Cipla's offer to pay them 5% royalties
          in
          exchange for licenses to sell knockoffs of those companies' patented
          anti-AIDS
          drugs in developing countries, the Wall Street Journal reports.
          A New York Times editorial praises Cipla's recent offer, calling it
          "a step
          toward commuting the death sentences now hanging over the 25 million
          Africans infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS."
          The editorial also says that the offer "has greatly increased the
          possibility that
          poor nations will be able to treat AIDS, especially if it provokes
          brand-name
          drug makers to lower their prices, as it seems to be doing."
          Even at the $600 price tag for governments, though, the editorial
          warns that
          these drugs are still out of reach for most Africans, and says that
          wealthy nations
          will need to step up efforts in continuing to help Africa, in particular
          helping
          "African nations improve their health care delivery systems so they can
          properly
          administer these drugs -- an effort that would reap many other health
          benefits as
          well" (New York Times, 25 Feb).
          A Chennai Hindu editorial says that "the global pharmaceutical
          industry is
          unlikely to be the same after the dramatic offer by the Indian firm
          Cipla."
          Quoting Cipla's joint managing director Amar Lulla as saying "as the
          volumes
          get larger, prices could fall even further," the editorial says that
          "this is almost
          certain to happen now that Ranbaxy, another Indian pharma major, has
          announced that it will start production of anti-retroviral drugs" to
          suppress HIV
          (Chennai Hindu, 23 Feb).




          � 2001 by National Journal Group Inc., 1501 M St., N.W., Washington, DC
          20005.

          UN Wire is a free service sponsored by the United Nations Foundation and
          its sister
          organization, the Better World Fund, which are dedicated to supporting
          United Nations
          efforts on behalf of the environment, population stabilization and
          children's health. UN
          Wire is produced independently by National Journal Group. For the latest
          information and
          updates on UN Foundation activities, visit us on the web at
          http://www.unfoundation.org



          _________________________________________________________________
          Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com
        • Luz Huntington
          Thanks Liz, Don and Cathy, I took a look at the Doctors Without Borders website and was very impressed. They have some great info to offer, I really liked
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 1, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks Liz, Don and Cathy,
            I took a look at the Doctors Without Borders website and was very impressed.
            They have some great info to offer, I really liked their top ten list of the
            lesser known humaritarian crises. I did register with them and will probably
            send a bit of "Kwacha" their way.

            I'd be interested in hearing what other charities volunteers would recommend
            and which they feel are worthy of their hard earned money. Rob and I have
            made small donations to CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate Association)
            which seems to do good work with children and the judicial/foster care
            systems. Also sent some money to Zero Population Growth and ACU (Association
            of Clinicians for the Underserved).

            Thanks again for the info
            Luz

            >From: "Bell, Elizabeth" <eib6@...>
            >Reply-To: ujeni@yahoogroups.com
            >To: "'ujeni@yahoogroups.com'" <ujeni@yahoogroups.com>
            >Subject: RE: [ujeni] Doctors Without Borders
            >Date: Tue, 27 Feb 2001 16:10:22 -0500
            >
            >msf's utilization of funds is quite good, one of the best. the percentage
            >of their funds that are spent on admin and overhead costs is quite small
            >and
            >well below the non-profit/charity standard.
            >
            >and they won the 1999 nobel peace prize....
            >
            >for more info:
            >http://www.msf.org/
            >

            _________________________________________________________________
            Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com
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