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Re: [ujeni] Malawi news

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  • Paul Dever
    Reply to: RE [ujeni] Malawi news Hmmm. I remember putting THAT news in a Lilongwe Briefs in 1995...News sure is slow... ... Date: 5/18/00 2:47 PM To:
    Message 1 of 10 , May 18, 2000
      Reply to: RE>[ujeni] Malawi news
      Hmmm. I remember putting THAT news in a Lilongwe Briefs in 1995...News
      sure is slow...

      --------------------------------------
      Date: 5/18/00 2:47 PM
      To: Custodian
      From: ujeni@egroups.com
      Malawi Has Highest Death Rate on Roads

      Blantyre (Malawi) (African Eye News Service, May 17, 2000) - Malawi's road
      accident rate is the highest in the world at 228 deaths per 10 000
      vehicles,
      African Eye News Service (South Africa) reports.

      This is according to a Road Safety Study conducted over five years in 19
      countries. The study was conducted by between 1990 and 1995 De Leuw
      Cather International, which has just released its final report on the
      study.

      It found that six African countries are in the top 10 list of nations with
      high
      accident rates. The United Kindgom has the lowest road deaths at 1.4 deaths
      for every 10 000 vehicles.

      In 1998, about 1 000 people died in 7 100 reported accidents in Malawi,
      says
      the National Road Safety Council of Malawi.

      Blame has been placed on speeding, as well as unroadworthy and unlicensed
      vehicles. Malawi is also said to have the worst roads in the Southern
      African
      Development Community because of years of no maintenance.

      *****

      Court Acquits German, Blames Police for Highhandedness

      Lilongwe, Malawi (PANA) (Panafrican News Agency, May 17, 2000) -
      Lilongwe Principal Resident Magistrate Harold Chafuwa Wednesday found a
      German research student not guilty in a case of inciting Monday's
      demonstration
      against policies of the World Bank and the IMF.

      The man, identified only as Anders was the only one arrested in the melee
      that
      followed the otherwise peaceful demonstration where trade unions and civil
      rights NGOs organised a protest against World Bank and IMF policies that
      they
      said impacted negatively on Malawians.

      But the police fired teargas canisters to disperse the demonstrators,
      branding the
      protest march an unlawful assembly.

      The German, who arrived in Malawi to conduct research on how Structural
      Adjustment Programmes affected the poor, was cornered by the anti-riot
      police
      who accused him of encouraging the protest. He had his tape-recorder and
      passport confiscated and whisked him away to a police station.

      The German embassy intervened and secured bail for him on the same day. But
      Anders, during the short trial, declared his innocence, saying he was not
      part of
      the demonstration and was only curious since the march was about structural
      adjustment policies. He told the court his research was supposed to form a
      basis
      for his doctorate thesis.

      Chafuwa agreed with the German, wondering why the police picked only on
      him, leaving the others free. He ruled that the police had failed to prove
      any case
      to convict Anders. He therefore found him not guilty and acquitted him of
      the
      charges.

      "Malawi has a constitution that guarantees freedom of assembly," Chafuwa
      said.

      Anders later told PANA outside the court that his short incarceration had
      affected his research. He said he was supposed to write a report to his
      supervisor at the University of Malawi. He, however, said he was glad that
      Malawi has a justice system that could be trusted.

      "I was only a bystander. It beats me why they picked on me," he said.

      The case of Anders has embarrassed the Malawi government, which Tuesday
      took an unprecedented face- saving move to condemn the police action.

      Finance Minister Matthews Chikaonda told journalists at a press conference
      he
      held together with World Bank director for Angola, Zimbabwe and Malawi,
      Barbara Kafka, that the government regretted the police action.

      "We, as a government, uphold human rights. The police action was
      regrettable,"
      he said.

      The arrest of the German, and the over-reaction of Malawi's highly
      politicised
      police towards the marchers, enlisted world-wide protests from human rights
      organisations.

      A source told PANA President Bakili Muluzi, a former Malawi Congress Party
      secretary-general at a time when the police behaved like it was above the
      law,
      has been inundated with messages over the incident.

      Observers have noted that, in spite of a British- aided reform programme,
      the
      Malawi police has yet to be de-politicised and anything like a peaceful
      protest is
      not taken kindly by its handlers.

      *****

      Malawi Urged to Cut Expenditure and Fight Inflation

      Blantyre (Malawi) (African Eye News Service, May 17, 2000) - The
      International Monetary Fund (IMF) urged Malawi on Wednesday to fight the
      country's spiralling 30% inflation rate and its crippling US$2.3 billion
      external
      debt.

      The IMF suggested that Malawi's government cut expenditure by halting
      subsidies to its free farm input scheme, maize price and fuel levies.

      The suggestions were made at a three-day Consultative Group (CG) meeting in
      Lilongwe, which was attended by 17 international lending institutions and
      creditor nations. The IMF said Malawi's inflation had to be cut by at
      least 10%
      by the end of 2001 and that its real GDP growth be raised to 5% this year.

      Malawi's current fiscal deficit is 3% of the Gross Domestic Product and
      should
      be brought down to 1.4% in the 2000/1 budget, the IMF said.

      The country's current account deficit, including grants is projected to
      rise from
      5.5% of the GDP in 2000 to 6.4% in 2001, and 7% in 2002, according to IMF.

      "Because of weak control procedures and budgetary resources, government
      expenditure has risen sharply," said IMF Malawi head of mission, Thomas
      Gibson.

      Malawi's finance minister, Mathews Chikaonda, blamed the government's heavy
      borrowing on unpredictable donor inflows.

      Depending on the outcome of the meeting, which ended on Wednesday, Malawi
      is to be considered for debt relief as part of the IMF/World Bank's list
      of Highly
      Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC).

      Follow-up discussions on debt relief will take place in Washington DC in
      June.

      Japan, Malawi's single biggest donor, opposed giving loans as a means of
      debt
      relief and suggested that indebted countries rather be given more
      financial grants
      until their economies recovered.

      Japan promised to continue to assist Malawi even it was included in the
      HIPC.

      *****

      Court To Make Ruling On Election Fraud Case Friday

      Panafrican News Agency
      May 17, 2000

      Lilongwe, Malawi (PANA) - The long-awaited
      judgement in a case in which the
      opposition in Malawi is disputing President
      Bakili Muluzi's victory in the June 1999
      election will be delivered in the Lilongwe High
      Court Friday.

      Charles Mkandawire, the registrar of the court,
      said the presiding judge, Justice
      Isaac Mtambo, has finished preparing his
      judgement.

      "The judge told me this (Wednesday) morning to
      inform concerned parties that
      judgement is Friday," he told PANA.

      Mkandawire said that owing to the political
      sensitivity of the case, security would
      be tightened to avoid ugly scenes.

      The opposition, led by presidential hopeful
      Gwanda Chakuamba, dragged Muluzi
      and the Electoral Commission to court, accusing
      the latter of fraudulently declaring
      Muluzi winner in the closely-run contest.

      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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      Date: Thu, 18 May 2000 09:55:56 -0400
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      Subject: [ujeni] Malawi news
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    • Rand Wise
      A child dies of malaria every second in Africa, according to statistics from Malawi s Malaria Control Programme. That s 31 million African children per year.
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 15, 2000
        "A child dies of malaria every second in Africa, according to statistics
        from Malawi's Malaria Control Programme."

        That's 31 million African children per year. Surely this can't be right.
        Figures I've seen say about 1 to 2 million people (of all ages worldwide)
        die from malaria annually.

        Not to diminish how devastating it is.
      • Paul DEVER
        Probably a child dies in Africa every second, but to get more money you inflate the figures.... Actually statistically, that would mean a negative Population
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 15, 2000
          Probably a child dies in Africa every second, but to get more money you
          inflate the figures.... Actually statistically, that would mean a negative
          Population Growth, so we can put Chishango out of business...

          The cynic in me sees this as a ploy to get more money for conferences,
          sitting fees, etec... Good thing I left Africa, huh...


          ----Original Message Follows----
          From: Rand Wise <wiserd@...>
          Reply-To: ujeni@egroups.com
          To: ujeni@egroups.com
          Subject: Re: [ujeni] Malawi news
          Date: Thu, 15 Jun 2000 10:59:03 -0400

          "A child dies of malaria every second in Africa, according to statistics
          from Malawi's Malaria Control Programme."

          That's 31 million African children per year. Surely this can't be right.
          Figures I've seen say about 1 to 2 million people (of all ages worldwide)
          die from malaria annually.

          Not to diminish how devastating it is.



          ________________________________________________________________________
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        • Paul DEVER
          I am glad to see that the courts are taking hold of very important activites such as deciding how long one s hair can be, as opposed to...say....drinking water
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 26, 2000
            I am glad to see that the courts are taking hold of very important activites
            such as deciding how long one's hair can be, as opposed to...say....drinking
            water for every one...less dependency on one cash crop (no, I won't be
            hypocritical and spout off about the evils of tobacco)...and other pressing
            social issues...

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          • Daniel Dudley
            I thought that the second article was very beautifully written. Why wasn t this guy at any of the Bottle Stores that I consumed Carlsberg at? Dan ...
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 11, 2000
              I thought that the second article was very beautifully written. Why wasn't
              this guy at any of the Bottle Stores that I consumed Carlsberg at?
              Dan

              >From: "Christine Chumbler" <cchumble@...>
              >Reply-To: ujeni@egroups.com
              >To: ujeni@egroups.com, seanconchar@...
              >Subject: [ujeni] Malawi news
              >Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2000 13:29:39 -0400
              >
              >Journalist threatened, film confiscated
              >
              > The Media Institute of Southern Africa
              > July 10, 2000
              >
              > Windhoek - On Thursday July 6, journalist
              >Pushpa Jamieson was threatened by
              > about five heavily armed Police Mobile Force
              >(PMF) members while covering the
              > aftermath of Malawi's 36th independence
              >anniversary at the Civil Service Stadium
              > in Lilongwe.
              >
              > Jamieson had photographed the aftermath of
              >clashes between riot police and
              > hundreds of people who could not be
              >accommodated in the stadium when she was
              > accosted by the PMF members. While training
              >their guns on her, they confiscated
              > her camera and threatened to shoot her if she
              >resisted. They claimed she was not
              > allowed to take pictures of riots, but Jamieson
              >had only photographed the debris in
              > the main road and not the actual riots.
              >
              > After the incident Jamieson returned to the
              >"Chronicle" offices, where she reported
              > the matter to her colleagues. A while later,
              >the same policemen who had
              > confiscated her camera stopped near the paper's
              >office, prompting newspaper staff
              > to approach them about the camera. One of the
              >officers then used a wooden baton
              > to beat journalist Don Kulapani, while other
              >officers threatened to arrest the other
              > journalists. Kulapani was saved from serious
              >injury by the intervention of other
              > staff. A short while later about twenty other
              >officers arrived on the scene and
              > threatened to shoot the journalists if they did
              >not leave the place.
              >
              > "Who do you think you are? We are doing our
              >job. You can go and sue if you
              > want. We are PMF, so watch yourself," one of
              >the policemen were quoted as
              > saying.
              >
              > Later that same day, Jamieson's camera was
              >returned to her, but without the film.
              >
              >*****
              >
              >Africa is not a basket case
              >
              > Why does the Western media goes out of its way to trash the
              >image of the
              > African continent?
              >
              >
              >
              > JOHN MATSHIKIZA asks
              >
              >
              > To paraphrase from a character in one of Toni Morrison's
              >great novels:
              > "The trouble with these people is that they just don't
              >know when to stop."
              >
              > OK, I admit it, I'm still smarting. Sitting in the centre of
              >the African continent,
              > staring out at its myriad wonders, I find myself still
              >smouldering like the
              > magnificently mysterious Mount Cameroon, ready to explode. For
              >why?
              >
              > A recent edition of The Economist magazine led with a cover
              >story entitled
              > "Hopeless Africa". It was another example of the Western media
              >going out of its
              > way to trash the image of the continent, to seek to sustain the
              >notion that Africa
              > will remain the basket case that it has always been in the
              >Western imagination.
              >
              > Yes, there is hideous civil war raging in Sierra Leone; the
              >Democratic Republic of
              > Congo remains an intractable mire of war, political intrigue
              >and financial
              > corruption; Ethiopia and Eritrea are involved in a mortal
              >combat of twin brothers;
              > Aids casts its lethal and unexplainable shadow from north to
              >south; illiteracy is
              > growing, children face a bleak future.
              >
              > And yet, this is not the only story out of Africa. There are
              >other, equally important
              > stories, stories that are seldom told, about the sheer
              >exuberance and variety of the
              > place. How can there be one image of Africa?
              >
              > And yet, in spite of the schoolyard chant that says "Sticks and
              >stones may break
              > my bones, but names can never hurt me", a bad image, when
              >carefully placed, is
              > hard to shake off. Thus readers of The Economist, sitting
              >thousands of miles away
              > from the continent in question, would have swallowed the whole
              >thing, hook line
              > and sinker, when that noble rag made so bold as to say:
              >
              > "Africa was weak before the Europeans touched its coasts.
              >Nature is not kind to
              > it. This may be the birthplace of mankind, but it is hardly
              >surprising that humans
              > sought other continents to live in ..."
              >
              > Three quick lies in three quick
              > sentences. But their message hits home,
              > nevertheless. Potential foreign investors
              > are told what they want to hear, and
              > decide on the basis of nothing more than hearsay to stay away.
              >
              > A chain reaction follows. Continually destabilised
              >economically, Africa finds it
              > hard to stabilise politically. Huge numbers of its
              >best-qualified citizens choose to
              > join the brain-and-body drain and leave "hopeless Africa"
              >forever - joining the
              > rest of those (supposedly "sensible") "humans [who] sought
              >other continents to
              > live on". The lie becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.
              >
              > But what does one actually perceive on the ground?
              >
              > Take the Congo. On the surface, and all too terribly, a basket
              >case living through
              > an endless and meaningless series of civil wars, with no
              >infrastructure worth
              > speaking of 40 years after independence from the Belgians, and
              >so on. And yet,
              > people are living there. The land is wide, rich and fertile.
              >The marketplace culture
              > is alive and kicking. If the ordinary people were allowed to
              >live in peace, they
              > would be able to demonstrate their political sophistication and
              >their ability to uplift
              > and govern themselves.
              >
              > Far from The Economist's view that "nature is not kind to it",
              >the Congo is
              > testimony to the fact that Africa's natural riches are part of
              >its fatal problem.
              > Everyone greedily wants a share.
              >
              > Far from all intelligent life forms choosing to leave it
              >(although there are hundreds
              > of thousands of refugees and political and economic exiles),
              >Africa, on the
              > contrary, as well as being abundantly populated in the most
              >fertile of its regions, is
              > also still being endlessly invaded from other continents. This
              >invasion - from
              > Britain, from Lithuania, from the Americas, from China, from
              >Israel, from New
              > Zealand or wherever else there is a class of buccaneer
              >missionaries to sample
              > from - comes, as it has always come, for the twin purposes of
              >rape and pillage.
              > Cobalt, wood, gold, aluminium, copper, oil, rubber, platinum,
              >diamonds - you
              > name it, Africa's got it, and someone else wants it. Wildlife
              >(both for viewing and
              > hunting) exists in unparalleled abundance. And then there is
              >the endless variety of
              > its people, with their incomprehensible, fascinating, age-old,
              >yet adaptable,
              > cultures. Africa is still, in Western eyes, and in spite of all
              >the deliberate
              > disinformation, "God's own country".
              >
              > "Hopeless Africa" is rather an image of hopelessly passionate
              >romance. If Africa
              > was really a hopeless case, if it was really nothing more than
              >Heart of Darkness
              > and "The White Man's Grave", would there still be so many of
              >the latter species,
              > in all shapes and genders, moving so tenaciously through its
              >heartland? From King
              > Solomon's Mines to The Snows of Kilimanjaro, from Out of
              >Africa, the film
              > Chocolat, and whatever is coming out next, the West's romance
              >with Africa is a
              > gripping and eternal part of its secret personality. And like a
              >secret lover, it has to
              > be denounced to its very face to keep the secret safe.
              >
              > What else does one perceive from down here on the ground?
              >
              > That Africa is not an entity divorced from the history of the
              >rest of the world. Nor
              > is it remote from any aspect of what the world is today. Not
              >only is the African
              > image deeply embedded in many of the accepted symbols of world
              >culture: vast
              > arrays of the cultures of the world are part of the African
              >image - while not
              > contradicting the existence of a distinct African identity.
              >
              > Africa, like the rest of the world, is capable of being both
              >ancient and modern at
              > the same time.
              >
              > Africa is like the rest of the world. Except that it is Africa.
              >
              > We must not avoid being critical of our own continent. But we
              >must also try to
              > keep a clear eye on what the continent is really like, and be
              >clear that it is not, by
              > a long stretch of the imagination, a hopeless case.
              >
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              >

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            • Vyrle Owens
              12 July 2000 Dear Christine, Thank you for the article, Africa is not a Basket Case. People hear so much of the negative (poverty, war, famine, HIV/AIDS,
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 12, 2000
                12 July 2000

                Dear Christine,

                Thank you for the article, "Africa is not a Basket Case."

                People hear so much of the "negative" (poverty, war, famine, HIV/AIDS,
                deforestation, mineral depletion, civil disorder, etc. etc. etc.) that it
                is almost impossible to get them to actually hear something positive about
                Africa.

                Actually, I don't think people believe me (even people who know me well and
                trust me) when I describe the very positive 6 year's experience I had in
                Southern Africa. Sure there were problems, challenges, and not a few
                heartbreaking incidents. But there were also many delightful times, "a-ha
                moments," and heartwarming relationships to remember.

                It was a great place to experience 6 years of the sorrows and joys of life.
                What more can I say? Focusing on either the negative and tragic, or the
                natural beauty and human tenacity will fail to give a balanced picture. I
                just wonder why the "west" clings to its "negative" image so tightly, not
                only of Africa, but also of India and other places filled with large
                numbers of struggling people who aren't exactly white.

                Thanks for keeping the news on/in the ujeni. It is about the only material
                about Africa I get these days.

                Also thanks to Elizabeth Bell for the HIV/AIDS updates.

                Vyrle

                ----------
                > From: Christine Chumbler <cchumble@...>
                > To: ujeni@egroups.com; seanconchar@...
                > Subject: [ujeni] Malawi news
                > Date: Tuesday, 11 July, 2000 10:29 AM
                >
                > Journalist threatened, film confiscated
                >
                > The Media Institute of Southern Africa
                > July 10, 2000
                >
                > Windhoek - On Thursday July 6, journalist
                Pushpa Jamieson was threatened by
                > about five heavily armed Police Mobile Force
                (PMF) members while covering the
                > aftermath of Malawi's 36th independence
                anniversary at the Civil Service Stadium
                > in Lilongwe.
                >
                > Jamieson had photographed the aftermath of
                clashes between riot police and
                > hundreds of people who could not be
                accommodated in the stadium when she was
                > accosted by the PMF members. While training
                their guns on her, they confiscated
                > her camera and threatened to shoot her if she
                resisted. They claimed she was not
                > allowed to take pictures of riots, but
                Jamieson had only photographed the debris in
                > the main road and not the actual riots.
                >
                > After the incident Jamieson returned to the
                "Chronicle" offices, where she reported
                > the matter to her colleagues. A while later,
                the same policemen who had
                > confiscated her camera stopped near the
                paper's office, prompting newspaper staff
                > to approach them about the camera. One of the
                officers then used a wooden baton
                > to beat journalist Don Kulapani, while other
                officers threatened to arrest the other
                > journalists. Kulapani was saved from serious
                injury by the intervention of other
                > staff. A short while later about twenty other
                officers arrived on the scene and
                > threatened to shoot the journalists if they
                did not leave the place.
                >
                > "Who do you think you are? We are doing our
                job. You can go and sue if you
                > want. We are PMF, so watch yourself," one of
                the policemen were quoted as
                > saying.
                >
                > Later that same day, Jamieson's camera was
                returned to her, but without the film.
                >
                > *****
                >
                > Africa is not a basket case
                >
                > Why does the Western media goes out of its way to trash the
                image of the
                > African continent?
                >
                >
                >
                > JOHN MATSHIKIZA asks
                >
                >
                > To paraphrase from a character in one of Toni Morrison's
                great novels:
                > "The trouble with these people is that they just don't
                know when to stop."
                >
                > OK, I admit it, I'm still smarting. Sitting in the centre of
                the African continent,
                > staring out at its myriad wonders, I find myself still
                smouldering like the
                > magnificently mysterious Mount Cameroon, ready to explode. For
                why?
                >
                > A recent edition of The Economist magazine led with a cover
                story entitled
                > "Hopeless Africa". It was another example of the Western media
                going out of its
                > way to trash the image of the continent, to seek to sustain
                the notion that Africa
                > will remain the basket case that it has always been in the
                Western imagination.
                >
                > Yes, there is hideous civil war raging in Sierra Leone; the
                Democratic Republic of
                > Congo remains an intractable mire of war, political intrigue
                and financial
                > corruption; Ethiopia and Eritrea are involved in a mortal
                combat of twin brothers;
                > Aids casts its lethal and unexplainable shadow from north to
                south; illiteracy is
                > growing, children face a bleak future.
                >
                > And yet, this is not the only story out of Africa. There are
                other, equally important
                > stories, stories that are seldom told, about the sheer
                exuberance and variety of the
                > place. How can there be one image of Africa?
                >
                > And yet, in spite of the schoolyard chant that says "Sticks
                and stones may break
                > my bones, but names can never hurt me", a bad image, when
                carefully placed, is
                > hard to shake off. Thus readers of The Economist, sitting
                thousands of miles away
                > from the continent in question, would have swallowed the whole
                thing, hook line
                > and sinker, when that noble rag made so bold as to say:
                >
                > "Africa was weak before the Europeans touched its coasts.
                Nature is not kind to
                > it. This may be the birthplace of mankind, but it is hardly
                surprising that humans
                > sought other continents to live in ..."
                >
                > Three quick lies in three quick
                > sentences. But their message hits home,
                > nevertheless. Potential foreign investors
                > are told what they want to hear, and
                > decide on the basis of nothing more than hearsay to stay away.

                >
                > A chain reaction follows. Continually destabilised
                economically, Africa finds it
                > hard to stabilise politically. Huge numbers of its
                best-qualified citizens choose to
                > join the brain-and-body drain and leave "hopeless Africa"
                forever - joining the
                > rest of those (supposedly "sensible") "humans [who] sought
                other continents to
                > live on". The lie becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.
                >
                > But what does one actually perceive on the ground?
                >
                > Take the Congo. On the surface, and all too terribly, a basket
                case living through
                > an endless and meaningless series of civil wars, with no
                infrastructure worth
                > speaking of 40 years after independence from the Belgians, and
                so on. And yet,
                > people are living there. The land is wide, rich and fertile.
                The marketplace culture
                > is alive and kicking. If the ordinary people were allowed to
                live in peace, they
                > would be able to demonstrate their political sophistication
                and their ability to uplift
                > and govern themselves.
                >
                > Far from The Economist's view that "nature is not kind to it",
                the Congo is
                > testimony to the fact that Africa's natural riches are part of
                its fatal problem.
                > Everyone greedily wants a share.
                >
                > Far from all intelligent life forms choosing to leave it
                (although there are hundreds
                > of thousands of refugees and political and economic exiles),
                Africa, on the
                > contrary, as well as being abundantly populated in the most
                fertile of its regions, is
                > also still being endlessly invaded from other continents. This
                invasion - from
                > Britain, from Lithuania, from the Americas, from China, from
                Israel, from New
                > Zealand or wherever else there is a class of buccaneer
                missionaries to sample
                > from - comes, as it has always come, for the twin purposes of
                rape and pillage.
                > Cobalt, wood, gold, aluminium, copper, oil, rubber, platinum,
                diamonds - you
                > name it, Africa's got it, and someone else wants it. Wildlife
                (both for viewing and
                > hunting) exists in unparalleled abundance. And then there is
                the endless variety of
                > its people, with their incomprehensible, fascinating, age-old,
                yet adaptable,
                > cultures. Africa is still, in Western eyes, and in spite of
                all the deliberate
                > disinformation, "God's own country".
                >
                > "Hopeless Africa" is rather an image of hopelessly passionate
                romance. If Africa
                > was really a hopeless case, if it was really nothing more than
                Heart of Darkness
                > and "The White Man's Grave", would there still be so many of
                the latter species,
                > in all shapes and genders, moving so tenaciously through its
                heartland? From King
                > Solomon's Mines to The Snows of Kilimanjaro, from Out of
                Africa, the film
                > Chocolat, and whatever is coming out next, the West's romance
                with Africa is a
                > gripping and eternal part of its secret personality. And like
                a secret lover, it has to
                > be denounced to its very face to keep the secret safe.
                >
                > What else does one perceive from down here on the ground?
                >
                > That Africa is not an entity divorced from the history of the
                rest of the world. Nor
                > is it remote from any aspect of what the world is today. Not
                only is the African
                > image deeply embedded in many of the accepted symbols of world
                culture: vast
                > arrays of the cultures of the world are part of the African
                image - while not
                > contradicting the existence of a distinct African identity.
                >
                > Africa, like the rest of the world, is capable of being both
                ancient and modern at
                > the same time.
                >
                > Africa is like the rest of the world. Except that it is
                Africa.
                >
                > We must not avoid being critical of our own continent. But we
                must also try to
                > keep a clear eye on what the continent is really like, and be
                clear that it is not, by
                > a long stretch of the imagination, a hopeless case.
                >
                > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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              • Rand Wise
                Remember that time we thought about writing a WID proposal to buying branding irons? It didn t occur to us at the time, but that last Malawi News article
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 13, 2000
                  Remember that time we thought about writing a WID proposal to buying
                  branding irons? It didn't occur to us at the time, but that last Malawi
                  News article tells us we might have been more successful if we had written
                  the proposal to buy a "blender", vis-a-vis the line below:

                  "Gulule at first refused to withdraw his statement, denying that he blended
                  the ruling party deputies thieves."
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