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  • Frits Westra
    Forwarded by: fwestra@hetnet.nl (Frits Westra) Originally from: JPLNews@jpl.nasa.gov Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status Original Date: Mon,
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 3, 2001
      Forwarded by: fwestra@... (Frits Westra)
      Originally from: JPLNews@...
      Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status
      Original Date: Mon, 2 Jul 2001 17:13:09 -0700 (PDT)

      ========================== Forwarded message begins ======================

      MEDIA RELATIONS OFFICE
      JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
      CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
      NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
      PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 91109. TELEPHONE (818) 354-5011
      http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

      Contact: Mary Hardin (818) 354-0344

      MARS ODYSSEY MISSION STATUS
      July 2, 2001

      NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft fine-tuned its flight
      path for arrival at Mars in October as it performed its second
      trajectory correction maneuver this morning.

      Odyssey fired its thrusters for 23 seconds at 9:30 a.m.
      Pacific time, which changed the spacecraft's velocity by 0.9
      meters per second (about 2 miles per hour).

      "Today's successful trajectory correction maneuver marks
      the completion of the mission's early cruise phase," said
      David A. Spencer, mission manager for 2001 Mars Odyssey at
      NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "All science payloads have
      been checked out and are operating well."

      The Odyssey flight team, he said, is now turning its
      focus to preparations for Mars orbit insertion and
      aerobraking, in which repeated passage through the upper
      atmosphere of the planet will be used to adjust the
      spacecraft's orbit.

      Last week, the team opened the door on the gamma ray
      spectrometer, managed by the University of Arizona in Tucson,
      and started taking data with the gamma sensor head. Initial
      data indicate that the detector performance is excellent.
      Odyssey is currently about 35 million kilometers (about
      22 million miles) from Earth and traveling at a speed of about
      27 kilometers per second (about 59,800 miles per hour)
      relative to the Sun.

      The Mars Odyssey mission is managed by the Jet Propulsion
      Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington,
      D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of
      Technology in Pasadena. The Odyssey spacecraft was built by
      Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver.

      #####

      ========================== Forwarded message ends ========================
    • Frits Westra
      Forwarded by: fwestra@hetnet.nl (Frits Westra) Originally from: JPLNews@jpl.nasa.gov Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status Original Date: Mon,
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 16, 2001
        Forwarded by: fwestra@... (Frits Westra)
        Originally from: JPLNews@...
        Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status
        Original Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2001 10:22:14 -0700 (PDT)

        ========================== Forwarded message begins ======================

        MEDIA RELATIONS OFFICE
        JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
        CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
        NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
        PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 91109. TELEPHONE (818) 354-5011
        http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

        Contact: Mary Hardin (818) 354-0344

        MARS ODYSSEY MISSION STATUS
        July 16, 2001

        At 8:30 a.m. Pacific time today, NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft
        passed the halfway point on its journey to Mars. It has been 100 days
        since Odyssey's launch and 100 days remain until it arrives at the red
        planet.

        "Odyssey is now closer to Mars than Earth. The spacecraft is healthy
        and all systems are looking good," said David A. Spencer, the
        Odyssey mission manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "Planning
        for Mars approach and orbit insertion in October is our primary focus
        right now."

        The navigation team reports the spacecraft is right on course. To
        date, the Deep Space Network has taken 11 separate measurements
        using the so-called delta differential one-way range measurement, a
        technique that uses two ground stations to determine the angular position
        of the spacecraft relative to the known position of a quasar. The
        measurements provide the navigation team with an additional source of
        information, adding confidence to their estimates of the Odyssey flight
        path.

        Today, Odyssey is 45.8 million kilometers (about 28.5 million miles)
        from Earth and 30 million kilometers (about 19 million miles) from
        Mars, traveling at a velocity of 26 kilometers per second (58,000 miles
        per hour) relative to the Sun.

        The Mars Odyssey mission is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space
        Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute
        of Technology in Pasadena. The Odyssey spacecraft was built by Lockheed
        Martin Astronautics, Denver.

        #####
        07/16/01
        #2001-145

        ========================== Forwarded message ends ========================
      • Frits Westra
        Forwarded by: fwestra@hetnet.nl (Frits Westra) Originally from: JPLNews@jpl.nasa.gov Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status Original Date: Fri,
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 13, 2001
          Forwarded by: fwestra@... (Frits Westra)
          Originally from: JPLNews@...
          Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status
          Original Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2001 14:07:20 -0700 (PDT)

          ========================== Forwarded message begins ======================

          MEDIA RELATIONS OFFICE
          JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
          CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
          NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
          PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 91109. TELEPHONE (818) 354-5011
          http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

          MARS ODYSSEY MISSION STATUS
          October 12, 2001

          Following last night's final planned course correction,
          NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is now on target to enter
          Martian orbit later this month.

          At 0400 Universal time on Friday, Oct. 12 (9 p.m. Pacific
          time, Thursday, Oct. 11), Odyssey fired its small thrusters
          for three seconds, which changed the speed and direction of
          the spacecraft by 0.077 meters per second (0.17 miles per
          hour). Odyssey will arrive at Mars at 0226 Universal time
          Oct. 24 (7:26 p.m. Pacific time Oct. 23).

          "This was a tiny maneuver, designed to change our
          altitude at arrival by just a few kilometers. The burn went
          exactly as planned," said David A. Spencer, Odyssey's mission
          manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

          On Monday, Oct. 15, the flight team will uplink the
          sequence of commands that pre-programs the spacecraft to fire
          its main engine and allows the spacecraft to be captured by
          the planet's gravity and enter orbit around Mars.

          Today, Odyssey is 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million
          miles) from Mars, traveling at a speed of 23 kilometers per
          second (51,800 miles per hour) relative to the Sun.

          The 2001 Mars Odyssey mission is managed by JPL for
          NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a
          division of the California Institute of Technology in
          Pasadena. The Odyssey spacecraft was built by Lockheed Martin
          Astronautics, Denver. The thermal emission imaging system is
          managed by Arizona State University, Tempe, and the gamma ray
          spectrometer is managed by the University of Arizona, Tucson.
          NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, built and manages the
          Martian radiation environment experiment.

          # # # # #

          10/12/01 MAH
          #2001-202

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        • Frits Westra
          Forwarded by: fwestra@hetnet.nl (Frits Westra) Originally from: JPLNews@jpl.nasa.gov Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status Original Date: Tue,
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 30, 2001
            Forwarded by: fwestra@... (Frits Westra)
            Originally from: JPLNews@...
            Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status
            Original Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2001 15:33:37 -0800 (PST)

            ========================== Forwarded message begins ======================

            MEDIA RELATIONS OFFICE
            JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
            CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
            NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
            PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 91109 TELEPHONE (818) 354-5011
            http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

            Mars Odyssey Mission Status
            October 30, 2001

            NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft took its first
            thermal infrared temperature image of Mars at approximately
            1300 Universal time (5 a.m. Pacific time) today. The imaging
            team at Arizona State University, Tempe will process the data
            over the next couple of days and hopes to release the image
            later this week. This morning's image is part of the
            calibration process for the thermal emission imaging system
            and is designed to help determine that the imaging system is
            working properly. The main science mapping mission is
            expected to begin in early February 2002.

            Flight controllers report the aerobraking phase is
            proceeding as planned. The first aerobraking pass, when the
            spacecraft slowly dips into the martian atmosphere to slow
            itself down, began on schedule last Friday night. Today,
            Odyssey is in its ninth pass around Mars. During its closest
            approach, the spacecraft is 128 kilometers (nearly 80 miles)
            above the surface and during its farthest point is 27,000
            kilometers (nearly 17,000 miles) away from Mars. Currently,
            Odyssey is in an elliptical orbit and aerobraking will
            circularize its path during the next three months.

            Following the orbit insertion last week, scientists
            turned on the high-energy neutron detector and the neutron
            spectrometer to check out and validate the instruments during
            the course of three orbits. Both instruments functioned well.
            Neutrons were successfully measured during each close pass by
            the planet. Those instruments have since been turned off.

            JPL manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's
            Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Principal
            investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the
            University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space
            Center, Houston, Texas, operate the science instruments.
            Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, Colo., is the prime
            contractor for the project, and developed and built the
            orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from
            Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California
            Institute of Technology in Pasadena. NASA's Langley Research
            Center in Hampton, Va., will provide aerobraking support to
            JPL's navigation team during mission operations.

            # # # # #
            10/30/01 MAH
            2001-211

            ========================== Forwarded message ends ========================
          • Frits Westra
            Forwarded by: fwestra@hetnet.nl (Frits Westra) Originally from: JPLNews@jpl.nasa.gov Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status Original Date: Thu,
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 27, 2001
              Forwarded by: fwestra@... (Frits Westra)
              Originally from: JPLNews@...
              Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status
              Original Date: Thu, 27 Dec 2001 13:29:07 -0800 (PST)

              ========================== Forwarded message begins ======================

              MEDIA RELATIONS OFFICE
              JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
              CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
              NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
              PASADENA, CALIF. 91109. TELEPHONE (818) 354-5011
              http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

              Mars Odyssey Mission Status
              December 27, 2001

              Flight controllers of NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey mission
              report that the aerobraking phase is proceeding right on
              schedule and should be completed in early January. During the
              aerobraking phase of the mission, the spacecraft is controlled
              so it skims the upper reaches of the martian atmosphere on
              each orbit, to reduce the vehicle's speed.

              Today, Odyssey's orbital period is three hours and 15
              minutes, compared with the initial 18-and-a-half hours when
              the spacecraft first entered orbit in October. The orbital
              period is the time required to complete one revolution around
              the planet.

              "We plan to perform a maneuver to raise the spacecraft
              up out of the atmosphere in early January. After that it will
              take about a month for us to circularize the orbit using our
              onboard thrusters and then prepare to start the science
              mission," said David A. Spencer, Odyssey's mission manager at
              NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The
              primary two-and-a-half year science mission is scheduled to
              begin in February.

              The high energy neutron detector provided by Russia's
              Space Institute has operated throughout much of the
              aerobraking phase and has completed its calibration in
              preparation for the science mission. The instrument is part
              of the gamma ray spectrometer payload suite, designed to map
              the elemental composition of the martian surface. Among its
              many science objectives, Odyssey will attempt to determine the
              amount and location of any near-surface water on Mars, if it
              exists.

              JPL manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's
              Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Principal
              investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the
              University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space
              Center, Houston, Texas, operate the science instruments.
              Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, Colo., is the prime
              contractor for the project, and developed and built the
              orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from
              Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California
              Institute of Technology in Pasadena. NASA's Langley Research
              Center in Hampton, Va., is providing aerobraking support to
              JPL's navigation team during mission operations.

              # # # # #


              12/27/01 MAH
              2001-247

              ========================== Forwarded message ends ========================
            • Frits Westra
              Forwarded by: fwestra@hetnet.nl (Frits Westra) Originally from: JPLNews@jpl.nasa.gov Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status Original Date: Fri,
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 11, 2002
                Forwarded by: fwestra@... (Frits Westra)
                Originally from: JPLNews@...
                Original Subject: Mars Odyssey Mission Status
                Original Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 14:30:02 -0800 (PST)

                ========================== Forwarded message begins ======================

                MEDIA RELATIONS OFFICE
                JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
                CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
                NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
                PASADENA, CALIF. 91109. TELEPHONE (818) 354-5011
                http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

                Mars Odyssey Mission Status
                January 11, 2002

                Flight controllers for NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft
                sent commands overnight to raise the spacecraft up out of the
                atmosphere and conclude the aerobraking phase of the mission.

                At 12:18 a.m. Pacific time Jan. 11, Odyssey fired its
                small thrusters for 244 seconds, changing its speed by 20
                meters per second (45 miles per hour) and raising its orbit by
                85 kilometers (53 miles). The closest point in Odyssey's
                orbit, called the periapsis, is now 201 kilometers (125 miles)
                above the surface of Mars. The farthest point in the orbit,
                called the apoapsis, is at an altitude of 500 kilometers (311
                miles). During the next few weeks, flight controllers will
                refine the orbit until the spacecraft reaches its final
                mapping altitude, a 400-kilometer (249-mile) circular orbit.

                "The successful completion of the aerobraking phase is a
                major milestone for the project. Aerobraking is the most
                complex phase of the entire mission and the team came through
                it without a hitch," said David A. Spencer, Odyssey's mission
                manager at JPL. "During the next month, we will be
                reconfiguring the spacecraft to begin the science mapping
                mission." The science mission is expected to begin in late
                February.

                During the aerobraking phase, Odyssey skimmed through the
                upper reaches of the martian atmosphere 332 times. By using
                the atmosphere of Mars to slow down the spacecraft in its
                orbit rather than firing its engine or thrusters, Odyssey was
                able to save more than 200 kilograms (440 pounds) of
                propellant. This reduction in spacecraft weight enabled the
                mission to be launched on a Delta II 7925 launch vehicle,
                rather than a larger, more expensive launcher.

                JPL manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's
                Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Principal
                investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the
                University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space
                Center, Houston, Texas, operate the science instruments.
                Additional science investigators are located at the Russian
                Space Research Institute and Los Alamos National Laboratories.
                Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, Colo., is the prime
                contractor for the project, and developed and built the
                orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from
                Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California
                Institute of Technology in Pasadena. NASA's Langley Research
                Center in Hampton, Va., is providing aerobraking support to
                JPL's navigation team during mission operations.

                01/11/02 #2002-010
                # # # # #

                ========================== Forwarded message ends ========================
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