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Fw: exosci.com / dec 4, 2000

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  • Jeroen Kumeling
    ... From: exoScience To: List Member Sent: Monday, December 04, 2000 3:21 PM Subject: exosci.com / dec 4, 2000
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 4, 2000
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: exoScience <davew@...>
      To: List Member <ufonet@...>
      Sent: Monday, December 04, 2000 3:21 PM
      Subject: exosci.com / dec 4, 2000


      > exoScience - http://www.exosci.com/
      >
      > * Mars was once a land of lakes
      > Layered geologic outcrops on Mars, described in today's issue of the
      > journal Science--may be composed of sedimentary rock that dates from the
      > earliest span of martian history, between 4.3. and 3.5 billion years ago.
      > Images of these sedimentary rock exposures, captured by the Mars Orbiter
      > Camera (MOC), suggest that parts of ancient Mars may have resembled a land
      > of lakes, and that the geology of early Mars was much more dynamic than
      > previously suspected.
      >
      > http://www.eurekalert.org/Elert/current/public_releases/scipak/malin.html
      >
      >
      > * The pounding of a lifetime
      > Lunar meteorite ages present new, strong evidence for the "lunar
      > cataclysm," a 20-to-200 million-year episode of intense bombardment of the
      > moon and the Earth at 3.9 billion years ago -- when the first evidence of
      > life appeared on Earth, planetary scientists report in the Dec. 1 issue of
      > Science. Whether or not there was life on Earth at the beginning of the
      > bombardment, such cataclysmic pounding would have enormous consequences
      > for life on this planet, whether by destroying existing life or organic
      > fragments or by delivering molecules and creating conditions suitable for
      > life, the researchers add.
      >
      > http://www.exosci.com/article.php?story=20001201055921573
      >
      >
      > * Bacteria make mine waste drinkable
      > Tiny bacteria that usher dissolved zinc into a solid form may help make
      > the removal of mining waste more efficient in groundwater and wetlands,
      > according to a study in the 1 December issue of Science.
      >
      > http://www.exosci.com/article.php?story=20001130194557521
      >
      >
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