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Fwd = Space Station Warranty to Expire

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  • Frits Westra
    Forwarded by: fwestra@hetnet.nl URL: http://abcnews.go.com/sections/science/DailyNews/shuttlewarranty000327.html) Original Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 28, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Forwarded by: fwestra@...
      URL: http://abcnews.go.com/sections/science/DailyNews/shuttlewarranty000327.html)
      Original Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 03:07:55 +0200

      ========================== Forwarded message begins ======================


      Space Station Warranty to Expire

      Barren Space Station Neglected Due to Lack of Russian Funds

      By Marcia Dunn
      The Associated Press

      C A P E C A N A V E R AL, Fla., March 27 -- NASA's space station
      warranty runs out this week, and the agency is no closer to finishing
      the project than it was when the first two pieces rocketed into orbit
      in 1998.
      After almost 500 days aloft, the international space station has
      no occupants, no experiments, no firm assembly plans. Instead, it's a
      barren two-roomer with bad batteries, noisy equipment and poor
      ventilation.
      Blame the Russians: They were supposed to launch a service module
      that would assume control of the station and provide living quarters
      just five months after the initial components soared, but they have
      been stymied by insufficient funds and malfunctioning rockets.
      As a result, the all-important third component, the Zvezda
      service module, will not fly before July and astronauts and cosmonauts
      will not move in until October -- at the earliest.

      Warranty for Russian-built Equipment
      In the meantime, the warranty for what's in orbit is expiring. And
      that has space shuttle astronauts flying to the rescue next month.
      The 496-day guarantee for Russian-built electronic equipment runs
      out Thursday, according to figures provided last year by then-station
      manager Frank Culbertson, an astronaut who will command a future
      station crew.
      NASA expects the space station to keep running normally until
      astronauts arrive in mid- to late April with new batteries, fans, air
      filters, fire extinguishers and smoke detectors. The astronauts were
      supposed to wait until the service module was in place, but with the
      warranty expiring and batteries failing, NASA moved up the visit.
      "Would you like it to fall out of the sky?" asks NASA
      Administrator Daniel Goldin. "I mean, we're going to go up and keep it
      in good repair and we'll be ready for the service module when it
      comes."
      Space station chief Michael Hawes expects the upcoming repairs by
      astronauts to extend the certified lifetime of the orbiting Zarya
      control module to the end of this year.
      Neither Hawes nor program manager Tommy Holloway is overly
      concerned.

      No Cause for Concern
      The design lifetime of parts is "mostly paper analysis kind of stuff,"
      Holloway says. "As you know with your automobile, it may break a day
      after you drive it out of the showroom and it may run for 100,000
      miles."
      Built by Russians with U.S. funds, Zarya was launched from
      Kazakstan on Nov. 20, 1998. That's when the 496-day warranty began.
      NASA sent up a connecting chamber called Unity two weeks later.
      Since then, the space station has circled Earth nearly 8,000
      times. Shuttle crews have been inside twice to drop off supplies and
      make repairs.
      The main trouble has been the batteries. Six are on board to
      provide power and have been faltering one by one.
      In addition, a crane attached to the outside of the station by
      spacewalking astronauts last spring is not locked down properly. The
      next shuttle crew will go out to secure it. The crew also will take
      numerous air samples; the last visitors suffered headaches and nausea,
      supposedly because the air ventilation was disturbed by maintenance
      work.

      Russians Lack Money
      Zarya, Russian for Sunrise, was not designed to fly so long by itself,
      says Hawes. It was modeled after Russian lab modules that were
      self-sustaining units until they docked with space station Mir's nerve
      center.
      "We've always known that Zarya was a less capable module from a
      lifetime standpoint," Hawes says. "But we have done quite a bit of
      work ... to try to understand where the issues are component by
      component, and that is what's really defined our mission for this
      upcoming flight."
      The problem is that for years, the Russians lacked the money to
      complete Zvezda, Russian for Star. Now that it's done, the module
      fails to meet NASA safety standards for noise, self-sustaining
      equipment and shielding against space junk.
      Then Russia's Proton rockets began failing. That's the type of
      rocket needed to launch the heavy Zvezda.
      "Right now, as I see it, the only thing standing in the way of
      launching the service module is a demonstration flight from the
      Proton," says NASA's boss, Goldin.

      NASA Has Backup Plan
      He'd like to see four or five successful Proton launches before the
      Zvezda service module flies. Just in case, NASA is building its own
      control module, which could be ready to go by December.
      Goldin and others are quick to point out that NASA has had its
      share of space station problems, most notably in computer software.
      Boeing, the prime contractor, projects cost overruns of close to $1
      billion, according to NASA's latest inspector general report.
      The most embarrassing debacle occurred last month. With so many
      stockpiled parts, workers accidentally threw out two oxygen and
      nitrogen tanks at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
      The tanks were worth $750,000.
      Russian delays, meanwhile, have cost NASA as much as $3 billion.
      Ironically, NASA and its foreign partners had invited Russia into the
      international space station program in 1993 in hopes of saving time
      and money.
      Given all this, should NASA have waited to launch the first two
      space station components when it was obvious the service module was in
      deep trouble?
      NASA officials are loath to second-guess that decision. But
      former astronaut Jerry Linenger, who spent nearly five months on Mir
      in 1997, says it was a political maneuver.
      "Kind of you do it, then everyone has to come up with more money
      or you've got things floating up there doing nothing," Linenger says.
      NASA clearly anticipated delays, especially as Russia's political
      and economic problems worsened. But no one guessed the Russians would
      take this long to launch the service module. A 496-day warranty seemed
      plenty.
      "That's a long way off," Culbertson said with a shrug last year.
      He's no longer shrugging.

      Copyright 2000 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

      ========================== Forwarded message ends ========================
    • Leandro
      www.geocities.com/fred_nelson_2000/espaco.htm Meteoros que entram no sol devido a gravidade dele e anomalias ocorridas no espaço.
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 29, 2000
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        www.geocities.com/fred_nelson_2000/espaco.htm

        Meteoros que entram no sol devido a gravidade dele e anomalias ocorridas no espa�o.
      • Leandro
        SunCruiser, ovni and ufos. http://www.ciranda.cjb.net*********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********On 28/03/00, at 14:26, Frits Westra wrote:From: Frits
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 3, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          SunCruiser, ovni and ufos.
          http://www.ciranda.cjb.net


          *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

          On 28/03/00, at 14:26, Frits Westra wrote:

          >From: Frits Westra <fwestra@...>
          >
          >
          >Forwarded by: fwestra@...
          >URL: http://abcnews.go.com/sections/science/DailyNews/shuttlewarranty000327.html)
          >Original Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2000 03:07:55 +0200
          >
          >========================== Forwarded message begins ======================
          >
          >
          > Space Station Warranty to Expire
          >
          > Barren Space Station Neglected Due to Lack of Russian Funds
          >
          > By Marcia Dunn
          > The Associated Press
          >
          > C A P E C A N A V E R AL, Fla., March 27 -- NASA's space station
          > warranty runs out this week, and the agency is no closer to finishing
          > the project than it was when the first two pieces rocketed into orbit
          > in 1998.
          > After almost 500 days aloft, the international space station has
          > no occupants, no experiments, no firm assembly plans. Instead, it's a
          > barren two-roomer with bad batteries, noisy equipment and poor
          > ventilation.
          > Blame the Russians: They were supposed to launch a service module
          > that would assume control of the station and provide living quarters
          > just five months after the initial components soared, but they have
          > been stymied by insufficient funds and malfunctioning rockets.
          > As a result, the all-important third component, the Zvezda
          > service module, will not fly before July and astronauts and cosmonauts
          > will not move in until October -- at the earliest.
          >
          > Warranty for Russian-built Equipment
          > In the meantime, the warranty for what's in orbit is expiring. And
          > that has space shuttle astronauts flying to the rescue next month.
          > The 496-day guarantee for Russian-built electronic equipment runs
          > out Thursday, according to figures provided last year by then-station
          > manager Frank Culbertson, an astronaut who will command a future
          > station crew.
          > NASA expects the space station to keep running normally until
          > astronauts arrive in mid- to late April with new batteries, fans, air
          > filters, fire extinguishers and smoke detectors. The astronauts were
          > supposed to wait until the service module was in place, but with the
          > warranty expiring and batteries failing, NASA moved up the visit.
          > "Would you like it to fall out of the sky?" asks NASA
          > Administrator Daniel Goldin. "I mean, we're going to go up and keep it
          > in good repair and we'll be ready for the service module when it
          > comes."
          > Space station chief Michael Hawes expects the upcoming repairs by
          > astronauts to extend the certified lifetime of the orbiting Zarya
          > control module to the end of this year.
          > Neither Hawes nor program manager Tommy Holloway is overly
          > concerned.
          >
          > No Cause for Concern
          > The design lifetime of parts is "mostly paper analysis kind of stuff,"
          > Holloway says. "As you know with your automobile, it may break a day
          > after you drive it out of the showroom and it may run for 100,000
          > miles."
          > Built by Russians with U.S. funds, Zarya was launched from
          > Kazakstan on Nov. 20, 1998. That's when the 496-day warranty began.
          > NASA sent up a connecting chamber called Unity two weeks later.
          > Since then, the space station has circled Earth nearly 8,000
          > times. Shuttle crews have been inside twice to drop off supplies and
          > make repairs.
          > The main trouble has been the batteries. Six are on board to
          > provide power and have been faltering one by one.
          > In addition, a crane attached to the outside of the station by
          > spacewalking astronauts last spring is not locked down properly. The
          > next shuttle crew will go out to secure it. The crew also will take
          > numerous air samples; the last visitors suffered headaches and nausea,
          > supposedly because the air ventilation was disturbed by maintenance
          > work.
          >
          > Russians Lack Money
          > Zarya, Russian for Sunrise, was not designed to fly so long by itself,
          > says Hawes. It was modeled after Russian lab modules that were
          > self-sustaining units until they docked with space station Mir's nerve
          > center.
          > "We've always known that Zarya was a less capable module from a
          > lifetime standpoint," Hawes says. "But we have done quite a bit of
          > work ... to try to understand where the issues are component by
          > component, and that is what's really defined our mission for this
          > upcoming flight."
          > The problem is that for years, the Russians lacked the money to
          > complete Zvezda, Russian for Star. Now that it's done, the module
          > fails to meet NASA safety standards for noise, self-sustaining
          > equipment and shielding against space junk.
          > Then Russia's Proton rockets began failing. That's the type of
          > rocket needed to launch the heavy Zvezda.
          > "Right now, as I see it, the only thing standing in the way of
          > launching the service module is a demonstration flight from the
          > Proton," says NASA's boss, Goldin.
          >
          > NASA Has Backup Plan
          > He'd like to see four or five successful Proton launches before the
          > Zvezda service module flies. Just in case, NASA is building its own
          > control module, which could be ready to go by December.
          > Goldin and others are quick to point out that NASA has had its
          > share of space station problems, most notably in computer software.
          > Boeing, the prime contractor, projects cost overruns of close to $1
          > billion, according to NASA's latest inspector general report.
          > The most embarrassing debacle occurred last month. With so many
          > stockpiled parts, workers accidentally threw out two oxygen and
          > nitrogen tanks at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
          > The tanks were worth $750,000.
          > Russian delays, meanwhile, have cost NASA as much as $3 billion.
          > Ironically, NASA and its foreign partners had invited Russia into the
          > international space station program in 1993 in hopes of saving time
          > and money.
          > Given all this, should NASA have waited to launch the first two
          > space station components when it was obvious the service module was in
          > deep trouble?
          > NASA officials are loath to second-guess that decision. But
          > former astronaut Jerry Linenger, who spent nearly five months on Mir
          > in 1997, says it was a political maneuver.
          > "Kind of you do it, then everyone has to come up with more money
          > or you've got things floating up there doing nothing," Linenger says.
          > NASA clearly anticipated delays, especially as Russia's political
          > and economic problems worsened. But no one guessed the Russians would
          > take this long to launch the service module. A 496-day warranty seemed
          > plenty.
          > "That's a long way off," Culbertson said with a shrug last year.
          > He's no longer shrugging.
          >
          > Copyright 2000 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
          >
          >========================== Forwarded message ends ========================
          >
          >
          >
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