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Fw: Issue 104 pt 1 - United Kingdom UFO Network

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  • Jeroen Kumeling
    ... Van: United Kingdom UFO Network Aan: UFO@MAELSTROM.STJOHNS.EDU Datum: maandag 3 januari 2000 0:32
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 4, 2000
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      -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
      Van: United Kingdom UFO Network <ukufonw@...>
      Aan: UFO@... <UFO@...>
      Datum: maandag 3 januari 2000 0:32
      Onderwerp: Issue 104 pt 1 - United Kingdom UFO Network


      | ______ _______ ______
      | ------ / / // ____// /---------------------------------------
      | U K / / // ___/ / / / 31st December 1999
      | / / // / / / / N E T W O R K Part 1 of 3 Issue 104
      | --- (_____//__/ (_____/------------------------------------------
      |
      |
      |
      | The United Kingdom UFO Network - a free electronic magazine with
      | subscribers in 58 countries. This e-zine is published in 3 parts. If
      | you are missing a part or parts e-mail us with the subject 'MISSING
      | PARTS' and we will mail you the whole e-zine.
      |
      |
      | e-mail us: ufo@...
      | fax us: (44) 0870 0883592
      | web site: www.ukufonw.co.uk
      |
      |
      | In this issue:
      |
      |
      | Editorial
      | ---------
      |
      |
      | Back issues of uk.ufo.nw and other e-zines.
      |
      |
      | United Kingdom News
      | -------------------
      |
      |
      | [UK 1] Near collision cith UFO baffles aviation expert.
      | [UK 2] Somerset sighting by Police Officer and wife.
      | [UK 3] How on earth do you lure little green tourists?
      | [UK 4] UFO in Glasgow airspace
      |
      |
      | World News
      | ----------
      |
      |
      | [W 1] X-Files version of history is backed by CIA report.
      | [W 2] Lawyer to sue for release of 'real X-Files'.
      | [W 3] When aliens come abducting, ask for a warm probe.
      | [W 4] Take a Virtual Tour of the Pentagon
      | [W 5] Moon Mystery
      | [W 6] Furry puppet turns up in ET search
      | [W 7] Multinational spy system ...
      | [W 8] Apollo Astronaut Was Murdered, Son Charges
      | [W 9] uk.ufo.nw takes a look at SETI@home web information
      | [W 10] New Mexico UFO Sighting Caught On Video
      |
      |
      | Letters
      | -------
      |
      |
      | Lights over Dorset???
      | Jerry Hartsell's book
      |
      |
      | Serialisation
      | -------------
      |
      |
      | Part three of three...
      |
      |
      | Foo Fighters, Fireballs and "Project Saucer."
      | Copyright: Jim Morris. 1996/97/98
      |
      |
      | Jim Morris <dx394@...
      |
      |
      | And finally!
      | ------------
      |
      |
      | Statement. Connecting to the IRC. How to subscribe.
      |
      |
      |
      | ----------===============******************===============----------
      |
      |
      |
      | Editorial
      | =========
      |
      |
      | Everyone here at United Kingdom UFO Network hope you all had a great
      | Christmas and wish you all a very safe, happy and prosperous New
      | Year.
      |
      |
      | ---
      |
      |
      | We would like to thank John Hayes for archiving all back issue of the
      | uk.ufo.nw e-zine. You will also find archives there for:
      |
      |
      | UK.UFO.NW / UFO Roundup / Filer's Files / AUFORN Australian UFO
      | Reports and Experiences
      |
      |
      | John says that he is constantly on the look out for details / updates
      | for UFO Organizations, Magazines, Conferences etc on a worldwide
      | basis.
      |
      |
      | ufoinfo@...
      |
      |
      | UFOINFO:- http://ufoinfo.com
      |
      |
      |
      | United Kingdom News
      | ===================
      |
      |
      | [UK 1]******
      |
      |
      | Source: BBC News
      | Publish Date: Wednesday 15th September 1999
      | From: doug@...
      |
      |
      | Near Collision With UFO Baffles Aviation Expert
      |
      |
      | A UFO that narrowly avoided colliding with a passenger jet
      | flying from London's Heathrow Airport has baffled aviation
      | experts.
      |
      |
      | The metallic grey-coloured object was spotted by the pilots
      | of an Oslo-bound McDonnell Douglas MD81 plane on 12 June
      | 1998, and passed just 20-50 metres from them.
      |
      |
      | The captain said the object was the size of a small aircraft,
      | while the co-pilot described it as a "bright light, very
      | close".
      |
      |
      | Reporting to an air traffic controller, the captain said "a
      | flare or something passed 20 feet from our aircraft", but
      | nothing had been recorded on the radar screen.
      |
      |
      | Radar blank
      |
      |
      | The pilot later filed a near-miss report, known as an
      | airprox, in which he said the object looked similar to a
      | fighter.
      |
      |
      | But a report by the Civil Aviation Authority found no
      | explanation for the incident, which has also confounded local
      | military experts and local police.
      |
      |
      | "Air traffic controllers were certain that even a very small
      | aircraft would have been detected, particularly on Heathrow
      | radar," said the report.
      |
      |
      | Although the evidence of the unnamed airline's crew is
      | considered to be reliable, the report notes that they only
      | caught a brief glimpse of the object.
      |
      |
      | Fewer near-misses
      |
      |
      | The incident was included in a Civil Aviation Authority
      | report, which found that dangerous aircraft near-misses fell
      | to an all-time low last year.
      |
      |
      | It is the first report to include airprox incidents filed by
      | both pilots and air traffic controllers.
      |
      |
      | The number of near-misses involving public transport flights
      | per 100,000 flying hours in 1998 was 1.20, compared with 2.37
      | in 1997 and 2.87 in 1996.
      |
      |
      | Three-quarters of those misses were judged as having no
      | actual risk of collision.
      |
      |
      | "The figures speak for themselves and show that more flying
      | does not automatically mean more risk as a consequence," said
      | Gordon McRobbie, director of the UK Airprox Board.
      |
      |
      | Chance miss
      |
      |
      | But he warned against complacency. "This report is aimed
      | squarely at all pilots and air traffic controllers and I
      | would encourage them to read about the incidents.
      |
      |
      | One of the most serious incidents listed involved two
      | passenger jets, which avoided collision only by chance after
      | a mistake by an overworked air traffic controller.
      |
      |
      | The incident happened near London's Stansted Airport on 14
      | August 1998, and involved a Stansted-to-Cork Ryanair Boeing
      | 737 and a Dublin-to-Stansted Aer Lingus BAe 146.
      |
      |
      | Even when a collision alert flashed up, the controller was
      | unsure what was happening and gave no instructions to the
      | planes to take avoiding action.
      |
      |
      | ---=== a further newspaper report on this ===---
      |
      |
      | Source: Daily Express newspaper
      | Publish Date: 16th September 1999
      | From: johnniem@...
      |
      |
      | A UFO came within 50 metres of a passenger plane flying from
      | Heathrow, according to two pilots. The mystery object did not show
      | up on radar and has baffled investigators, a near-miss report
      | revealed yesterday. It passed within 50 metres of an Oslo-bound
      | McDonnell Douglas MD81 in June last year. The captain reported it as
      | being the size of a small aircraft, while the co-pilot described it
      | as a "bright light, very close."
      |
      |
      | The UK Airprox Board's report said: "Air traffic controllers were
      | certain that even a very small aircraft would have been detected."
      |
      |
      | [UK 2]******
      |
      |
      | Source: Name and address suppied.
      |
      |
      | Dear sir/madam
      |
      |
      | My wife and I witnessed a sighting of a bright light, much larger
      | than a star and moving at a very high speed from about 120 degrees
      | from north to about 85 degrees from north. We were looking in an
      | easterly direction from our home in Weston Zoyland, Somerset at about
      | 0500 hours on Friday 10th September 1999.
      |
      |
      | This object suddenly became stationary for about 15 minutes during
      | which time I viewed it through my telescope. It appeared to have a
      | spherical underside but the top was not spherical. One side had a
      | faint red glow. After this period of time it moved in a direct line
      | away from us at great speed and eventually disappeared.
      |
      |
      | It has taken great courage to write this to you as neither of us have
      | ever seen anything like this before and as a Police officer I am
      | quite sceptical about these things.
      |
      |
      | uk.ufo.nw says: Further enquiries are being made regarding this
      | sighting. However if any reader has further information please mail
      | us.
      |
      |
      | [UK 3]******
      |
      |
      | Source: BBC Online
      | Publish Date: Monday 15th November 1999
      |
      |
      | How on earth do you lure little green tourists?
      |
      |
      | Expecting visitors? Better do some dusting, comb your hair, mow the
      | launchpad. A former mining town in the north-east of England is
      | taking the brave step of pitching for visitors from Mars.
      |
      |
      | Bedlington in Northumberland, whose residents some people class as
      | Geordies, is branching out to advertise itself to the red planet
      | thanks to Nasa.
      |
      |
      | Traders - including mechanics Tyred and Exhausted, burger shop Best
      | Byte and funeral directors AJ Gascoigne & Son - are expected to get
      | together to offer the aliens special deals.
      |
      |
      | The town's chamber of trade organised the move by replying to a Nasa
      | advert for material to be included on the Mars 2001 Lander
      | expedition.
      |
      |
      |
      | Chairman Malcolm Robinson said: "We'll offer any alien visitors a
      | range of discounts, with pensioner rates for haircuts, and discounts
      | on food and clothing.
      |
      |
      | "They won't get a warmer welcome anywhere in England."
      |
      |
      | But he added: "God knows if they'll understand our accents."
      |
      |
      | Local trader Margaret Millen was in little doubt that, if the message
      | is picked up on Mars, Bedlington would get a good reaction.
      |
      |
      | "It's a lovely little town, very friendly. It's really a country
      | town, even though it's only 12 miles from Newcastle and fairly close
      | to the industry," she said.
      |
      |
      | One notable chapter from the town's history was the production of
      | iron rails by Michael Longridge. A friend of George Stevenson, the
      | rails were used for the world's first passenger railway.
      |
      |
      | Although the town is treating the Nasa venture light-heartedly, it is
      | not a publicity shy place.
      |
      |
      | The chamber of trade's website directs potential customers to local
      | businesses, and makes the most of a worldwide - particularly US -
      | interest in Bedlington Terriers.
      |
      |
      | The site's webmaster writes: "Bedlington.co.uk was rather trying to
      | minimise this, but there is simply no getting away from the fact that
      | Bedlington is famous for its 'World Class' breed of dogs. If you
      | search the Internet it is almost as if that is all it's famous for.
      | Not so!"
      |
      |
      | The news of the Nasa CD comes 25 years after the first deliberate
      | radio message sent from Earth to the stars. In 1974, a three-minute
      | message about the human race was sent from the Arecibo radio
      | telescope in Puerto Rico.
      |
      |
      | Although the message has been travelling for a quarter of a century,
      | it's still only one-thousandth of its way to its target stars, 147
      | trillion miles away.
      |
      |
      | In 1973, Nasa sent a plaque on its Pioneer 10 craft with simple
      | greetings from humans, showing male and female form, and where earth
      | is in relation to the Sun.
      |
      |
      | It is still waiting for an answer.
      |
      |
      | ukufonw says: The BBC then asks it's readers to fill an online form
      | in asking the question..
      |
      |
      | How would you lure Martian tourists to your home town?
      |
      |
      | [UK 4]******
      |
      |
      | From: Paul Jones - UK.UFO.NW investigator
      | Source: scanner newsgroup
      | Date: 23rd December 1999
      |
      |
      | uk.ufo.nw are making further enquiries with John and it's British
      | Airways contacts.
      |
      |
      | UFO in Glasgow airspace
      |
      |
      | On Thu, 23 Dec 1999 22:15:14 -0000, in alt.radio.scanner.uk "John
      | Johnstone" <rangers@... wrote:
      |
      |
      | I was listening to the tower at Glasgow airport the other day and the
      | BA [British Airways] pilot came across the speaker and said that
      | there was something 12 miles above him and it wasn't showing on his
      | radar! In reply the tower guy said it was actually six miles above
      | and that he could see it although he said that when trying to contact
      | him the signal was broken and advised him to land as it was following
      | him. 118.800 is the frequency. This is not a joke or Hoax.
      |
      |
      |
      | World News
      | ==========
      |
      |
      | [W 1]******
      |
      |
      | Source: Daily Telegraph
      | Publish Date: Tuesday 17th August 1999
      |
      |
      | X-Files version of history is backed by CIA report
      |
      |
      | By Michael Smith
      |
      |
      | THE CIA has released a secret history of its investigations into UFO
      | sightings, revealing that there was more truth in the popular
      | television series The X-Files than is often believed.
      |
      |
      | The highly critical report describes often bitter debates between
      | real-life X-Files investigators who believed that "the truth is out
      | there" and their sceptical bosses. It records tales of bumbling
      | undercover agents whose activities fuelled a widespread belief that
      | the government was covering up what the agency described as
      | "extra-terrestrial visitations by intelligent beings".
      |
      |
      | The problem was eventually passed to the agency's physics and
      | electronics division where in true X-Files style just one analyst
      | investigated UFO phenomena. But the Fifties equivalent of Fox Mulder
      | was constantly undermined by his boss, described by the CIA history
      | as "a non-believer in UFOs", who tried but failed to declare the
      | project "inactive".
      |
      |
      | While the CIA investigations eventually concluded that all the
      | sightings could be explained, the report concludes that "misguided"
      | attempts to keep them secret led to widespread belief of a government
      | cover-up.
      |
      |
      | The report, written by Gerald K Haines, the official CIA historian,
      | was commissioned by the then CIA director James Woolsey in 1993 in
      | the wake of renewed claims of a CIA-led cover-up. It calls for the
      | first time on documents that the agency hid from UFO enthusiasts who
      | obtained thousands of more mundane files under the Freedom of
      | Information Act. The report, completed in 1997, has been released at
      | the request of the British academic journal Intelligence and National
      | Security and is published in its summer issue this month.
      |
      |
      | US intelligence began investigating UFO sightings in 1947 when a
      | pilot claimed to have seen nine discs travelling at more than 1,000
      | mph in Washington state. The claim was backed up by additional
      | sightings including reports from military and civilian pilots and air
      | traffic controllers.
      |
      |
      | The first investigation, Operation Saucer, was carried out by US air
      | intelligence which initially feared that the objects might be Soviet
      | bombers. But some officers became convinced that UFOs existed and in
      | a top-secret report concluded many of the sightings were
      | "interplanetary". Air force chiefs had the report rewritten to
      | conclude that "although visits from outer space are deemed possible,
      | they are believed to be very unlikely".
      |
      |
      | The CIA initially dismissed the investigations as "midsummer
      | madness". But an agency committee decided they could be used by
      | Moscow either to create mass hysteria or to overload the air warning
      | system, making it unable to distinguish between UFOs and Soviet
      | bombers.
      |
      |
      | In 1955, claims by two elderly sisters to have had contact with UFOs
      | attracted widespread publicity. A CIA agent describing himself as an
      | air force officer spoke to them and reported that he appeared to have
      | stumbled upon a scene from Arsenic and Old Lace. Analysis of a "code"
      | which the women believed aliens were using to make contact with them
      | while they listened to their favourite radio programme was morse code
      | from a US radio station.
      |
      |
      | But when UFO enthusiasts heard of the "air force" officer's visit
      | they became immediately suspicious that he was a member of the CIA
      | trying to cover up the affair. One enthusiast pursued the CIA
      | conspiracy theory and was visited by another CIA officer, who claimed
      | to be in the air force and even wore an air force uniform. The ruse
      | failed, making the conspiracy theorists even more suspicious.
      |
      |
      | The refusal to release 57 documents on the investigation in the
      | Seventies, to protect sources, also fuelled the cover-up theory,
      | Haines concluded.
      |
      |
      | [W 2]******
      |
      |
      | Source: Daily Telegraph
      | Publish Date: Sunday 22nd August 1999
      |
      |
      | Lawyer to sue for release of 'real X-Files'
      |
      |
      | By James Langton
      |
      |
      | THE truth is out there, and Peter Gersten believes that he knows
      | where to find it. As director of the Citizens Against UFO Secrecy he
      | will launch a lawsuit this week against the United States government,
      | claiming that its refusal to hand over secret documents on the
      | existence of flying saucers is a violation of his constitutional
      | rights.
      |
      |
      | While the authorities, including the Department of Defence and the
      | CIA, continue to insist that they are not concealing details about
      | alien incursions, their denials are undermined by growing evidence of
      | real-life X-Files.
      |
      |
      | The British academic journal Intelligence and National Security last
      | week published an official CIA report that documented attempts by the
      | agency to uncover the truth behind UFO sightings over half a century.
      |
      |
      |
      |
      | It revealed that the CIA operated its own team of UFO investigators
      | and that, like the television series The X-Files in which secret
      | agents probe extra-terrestrial activity, the agency was plagued by
      | sometimes bitter divisions between sceptics and those who believed in
      | flying saucers.
      |
      |
      | Mr Gersten and his organisation hope that their latest lawsuit will
      | force the authorities to reveal what they know about a large number
      | of well-documented sightings of large triangular craft seen over
      | Arizona and New Mexico in recent years.
      |
      |
      | The objects, some many times larger than a jumbo jet, have been
      | observed by tens of thousands of people. One was filmed over Phoenix
      | two years ago but later interpreted by the air force as a series of
      | flares dropped in a training mission - an explanation few accepted.
      |
      |
      |
      | "People have a right to the truth," says Mr Gersten, a lawyer from
      | Scottsdale, Arizona, who believes that extra-terrestrials are trying
      | to contact us through crop circles. "I believe that the authorities
      | have evidence and that I can prove it in a court of law."
      |
      |
      | While such extreme opinions are only shared by a tiny minority, most
      | Americans believe that their government knows more than it will say.
      | Opinion polls show that more than half now believe in UFOs. And after
      | years of denial, almost all branches of the American military now
      | admit that they carried out their own secret investigations into
      | flying saucers, particularly in the 1950s when UFO fever peaked.
      |
      |
      | The CIA report, by its official historian Gerald Haynes, says that
      | the agency eventually concluded that most reports could be explained
      | and that there were no little green men. While some CIA agents
      | believed that there was evidence of genuine UFO activity, the
      | official version attributes at least half the sightings to secret US
      | Air Force reconnaissance aircraft such as the U2 and Blackbird.
      |
      |
      | Dr Bruce Maccabee, one of America's leading UFO experts who regularly
      | met CIA agents from 1979, believes that the "real X-Files" are in the
      | vaults of the air force and FBI. The air force also maintained
      | Project Blue Book in which it documented nearly 13,000 sightings
      | between 1951 to 1969, all but 700 of which it was able to explain as
      | conventional aircraft or natural phenomenon.
      |
      |
      | The air force has also attempted - with very limited success - to end
      | speculation that it recovered the remains of a spacecraft which
      | crashed near Roswell, New Mexico, in 1947 and several alien bodies.
      | It has released previously classified files which claim that the
      | "saucer" was actually a weather balloon used to monitor nuclear tests
      | and that the "aliens" were crash test dummies for parachute
      | prototypes. Among UFO diehards, however, such "explanations" are
      | seen only as evidence of a further cover-up.
      |
      |
      | [W 3]******
      |
      |
      | Source: The Toronto Star
      | Publish Date: 24th August 1999
      |
      |
      | When aliens come abducting, ask for warm probe
      |
      |
      | IF YOU GET abducted by space aliens, you're going to get probed. You
      | might as well face it. That's why they abduct you. Not that you can
      | do anything about getting abducted. If they want to abduct you,
      | they'll abduct you, right?
      |
      |
      | Right?
      |
      |
      | At a cocktail party not long ago, a very nice cocktail party - nobody
      | in the room had ever watched Jerry Springer, nobody snuck up behind
      | you and made farting noises in their armpits - in an apartment at a
      | very classy Bloor St. W. address, I met a psychiatrist who, when I
      | asked what his specialty was, said most of his practice was people
      | who believe they've been abducted by space aliens.
      |
      |
      | I made sympathetic noises. Tsk, tsk. It must be difficult getting
      | them to realize they are delusional.
      |
      |
      | ``No,'' he said. The difficulty was getting them to understand that
      | nobody was going to believe they had been abducted, and they were
      | going to have a hard time, either forced to keep it to themselves, or
      | enduring the reaction - that they were goofballs. Nobody was going to
      | believe them, that is, but him.
      |
      |
      | I was so astonished that all I could think to say was, ``Does OHIP
      | cover this?''
      |
      |
      | ``If it's a referral,'' he said.
      |
      |
      | Right now an interesting dance is going on around the question of
      | UFOs. Call it the Catch-22 Two-step. The U.S. government has always
      | denied that all those bizarre sightings were UFOs. Because of this,
      | people naturally believed they were UFOs. Nobody believes the
      | government. Had the government said, ``Yikes! UFOs are everywhere!
      | We've been invaded!'' people would've said, ``The government is
      | cuckoo, as usual.''
      |
      |
      | So, just what is it you thought they probed? Your ears? ``Xgfyy!
      | Kngrg dm! Frgq!'' (``Hey! Lookit this! Wax!'')
      |
      |
      | Not as I understand it.
      |
      |
      | I understand a thing or two about it because I myself have been
      | abducted, although in my case I am one of the very few who was
      | probed, I guess you might say, abnormally. I didn't mention getting
      | abducted to that psychiatrist because I hadn't mentioned it to my GP,
      | and without OHIP coverage can you imagine what he'd have charged me
      | for our conversation at that cocktail party? He probably would've
      | been able to dash out and buy a second Mercedes. Put down cash. In
      | my case, I was abducted by aliens from a planet of intergalactic
      | dentists. ``Hjfft!'' (``Bleeding gums!'') ``Kkfgzzz!''
      | (``Abscesses!'') ``Pn!'' (``He should quit smoking!'') ``Glm mv mv!''
      | (``Plaque!'') ``Fzplat!'' (``Spit!'')
      |
      |
      | I came to under a bridge in Oshawa, bare-naked, clutching a floss
      | dispenser. Nobody who's been abducted and probed in this manner ever
      | talks about it. People think you're a goofball.
      |
      |
      | You can recognize people who have been subjected to the normal
      | probing by the way they walk. That's my theory.
      |
      |
      | It makes sense, when you think about it. David Jacobs of Temple
      | University in Philadelphia has written a book that explains why.
      |
      |
      | ``If it's a very busy ship - let's say there are 20 tables and
      | they've abducted 40 people,'' the aliens are what you could describe
      | as overbooked. As a result they are brusque and clinical. ``I would
      | use the word task-oriented.''
      |
      |
      | Get the point? They don't have time to warm up the, what do you call
      | them, instruments. Like in M*A*S*H* where they're always so rushed
      | they don't even rinse the scalpel between operations. Wheel in
      | another one. Open him up.
      |
      |
      | Even if the probers had the inclination, and maybe it has never
      | occurred to them. According to Jacobs, they have cold, rubbery skin.
      |
      |
      |
      | If you lived on a planet of cold rubbery beings and somebody probed
      | you with a warm whatever, you'd go, ``Bgnn! Fgrnng rq urgf! Nv tdt p
      | hkkw bn tdtp kqlqmb rbzx?'' (``Ooh! That feels awful! Have you no
      | respect for your patient's comfort?'') You'd want them to use
      | something that just came out of the fridge.
      |
      |
      | Anyway, as a result of all this, if you watch the way people walk you
      | can pretty well tell for sure. And often the way they sit. TV
      | anchors, for example. You notice how a lot of them stay standing
      | during newscasts these days? I think there's been a run on TV news
      | anchors lately. And when they do sit, they kind of lean over to one
      | side?
      |
      |
      | Unless they've been probed by dental aliens, but I'm not going to go
      | into that. We don't. We keep our mouths shut.
      |
      |
      | [W 4]******
      |
      |
      | Take a Virtual Tour of the Pentagon
      |
      |
      | Now is your chance to take a tour around the Pentagon from the
      | comfort of your own chair and computer monitor.
      |
      |
      | Point your browser at:
      |
      |
      | www.defenselink.mil
      |
      |
      | The full tour which uses Real Player takes 24 minutes or it can be
      | split into it's 14 subsections...
      |
      |
      | Introduction
      | DoD Organization
      | Secretary of Defense Corridor
      | Army Executive Corridor
      | Air Force Executive Corridor
      | Marine Corps Executive Corridor
      | Navy Executive Corridor
      | Hall of Heroes
      | MacArthur Corridor
      | Military Women's Corridor
      | African American Corridor
      | Hispanic Heroes Exhibit
      | Navajo Code Talkers Exhibit
      | Closing/Tour Information
      |
      |
      | [W 5]******
      |
      |
      | Source: exoscience
      | http://www.exosci.com/
      | New Scientist
      |
      |
      | Publish Date: Wednesday 20th October 1999
      |
      |
      | Moon Mystery
      |
      |
      | Reports of curious flashes and fleeting clouds on the Moon may not be
      | figments of wild imaginations, astronomers say. A new look at
      | observations by the American satellite Clementine show that a small
      | area on the Moon's surface darkened and reddened in April 1994. Why
      | this happened remains a mystery.
      |
      |
      | For hundreds of years, people have reported seeing flashes,
      | short-lived clouds and other brief changes on the Moon's surface. But
      | astronomers have never been able to confirm the sightings. "The
      | events were observed on many occasions, but most astronomers don't
      | believe in them," says Bonnie Buratti of NASA's Jet Propulsion
      | Laboratory in Pasadena, California.
      |
      |
      | On 23 April 1994, around a hundred amateur astronomers reported
      | seeing a possible darkening of the Moon, lasting 40 minutes, near the
      | edge of the bright lunar crater Aristarchus. At the same time, the US
      | Department of Defense's Clementine satellite was mapping the lunar
      | surface.
      |
      |
      | Intrigued by the amateur reports, Buratti's team has taken a close
      | look at the Clementine data to see if the satellite also recorded the
      | event. Sure enough, they found that the crater looked different
      | before and after the amateur reports. "After the event, it looks
      | redder," says Buratti, who announced the findings at a meeting of the
      | American Astronomical Society in Padua, Italy, last week.
      |
      |
      | Winifred Cameron, a retired astronomer who worked at the Lowell
      | Observatory in Arizona, thinks that brief colour changes might be
      | caused by small gas eruptions throwing dust around. We know that
      | there are pockets of gas in the lunar soil, and the gas may
      | occasionally escape. "I'm pretty sure that some of these changes are
      | due to emanations of gas that are more dense than usual," says
      | Cameron. "The Aristarchus region is the source of about a third of
      | all of these.
      |
      |
      | Charles Seife
      |
      |
      | [W 6]******
      |
      |
      | Source: BBC News Online
      | Publish Date: Monday 5th July 1999
      | From: doug@...
      |
      |
      | Furry puppet turns up in ET search
      |
      |
      | Greetings to the people of planet Earth
      |
      |
      | By BBC News Online Science Editor Dr David Whitehouse
      |
      |
      | The SETI@home Website, a project that processes data collected by
      | radio telescopes in a Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence
      | project has been hacked. For about five hours on Sunday [during
      | July], the home page was replaced with a single word - "WANTED" - and
      | an image of ALF, an extraterrestrial from a US TV sitcom of the same
      | name. Those who have not previously encountered this interstellar
      | ambassador may like to know that he crash-landed in a garage in Los
      | Angeles in 1986. He was named ALF, or Alien Life Form, by the humans
      | who were involved in first contact with him. The title of the Seti
      | Website was replaced with the words "attention people of Earth..."
      | Good looks Officials have dismissed it as an annoying prank, pointing
      | out that the hackers are wide of the mark when it comes to their
      | choice of an extraterrestrial. The problem with the hairy ALF is that
      | he is just too human-looking. Experts believe that alien life, if it
      | exists, is probably not like us. Indeed, they believe that if
      | evolution was re-run on Earth, it is very unlikely that anything
      | resembling humans - let alone ALF - would emerge a second time. Not
      | that many Seti scientists would be disappointed in finding something
      | like ALF - they just do not expect it to happen. Project officials
      | said that while they are satisfied with the security of their other
      | servers, they are checking them to be certain. The SETI@home project,
      | which opened to the public in mid-May, harnesses the downtime
      | computer power of subscribers to sift through data obtained by a
      | radio telescope to look for signals from space. More than 600,000
      | people have signed up since the project began.
      |
      | -[continued in part 2]-
      |
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