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Roswell to aliens: It's a new millennium, so give us a call

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  • Stig Agermose
    Source: Seattle Post-Intelligencer http://www.seattlep-i.com/national/spil01.shtml Stig *** Earth to aliens: It s a new millennium, so give us a call Saturday,
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 2, 2000
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      Source: Seattle Post-Intelligencer

      http://www.seattlep-i.com/national/spil01.shtml

      Stig

      ***

      Earth to aliens: It's a new millennium, so give us a call

      Saturday, January 1, 2000

      By JIM MOORE
      SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER

      ROSWELL, N.M. -- All cut from the same kooky cutter, the people arrived as
      UFO believers, gathering last night at the site of an old missile launcher
      to watch the world's brightest laser show.

      At midnight, beams of light danced against the starlit sky, stretching as
      high as 60,000 feet.

      It was more than a spectacle. This is where a spaceship was said to have
      crashed in 1947, leading to a supposed governmental cover-up in what became
      known as "The Roswell Incident."

      In an attempt to re-establish contact with the aliens, one of the lasers
      carried more than 10,000 electronic greetings into outer space. The
      objective: to see if E.T. or anyone else was home.

      By press time, the aliens had yet to click reply on their laptops. If they
      do, they will be embraced here.

      A drive around town reveals an "Aliens Welcome" sign at Arby's, a
      restaurant called "Outer Limits," a party at the Best Western featuring a
      baby alien in a glassed-in cocoon, and a UFO museum.

      "People ask me if I've seen any aliens," said Gary Thomas, owner of Badger
      Construction. "I say: 'Yeah, I like 'em. They taste just like chicken.'"

      Most of the earthlings' messages were warm and fuzzy, talking about hope
      and love and peace.

      Others were more amusing.

      "Hey Aliens! Git your hands off our wimmen," wrote Todd,
      spelling-challenged in cyberspace.

      "Yo homies," wrote another. "Whussup?"

      "Please bring chips and dip with you. I've got cookies in the oven for you
      when you arrive. Say hi to Chewbacca for me. Love you bunches," from Ted.

      "Hi out there! I don't have a great life and I need a weird fun friend,"
      wrote a lonely soul.

      Others wanted a spaceship delivered, preferably with the owner's manual
      included. Some wanted to be beamed up, tired of life on this planet. One
      man is sick of dating human beings.

      "Send me some alien babes," he said.

      The two men behind last night's extravaganza were Charlie Waters, chief
      executive officer of the Roswell Chamber of Commerce, and Frank Costantini,
      co-owner of starlite.com and lord of the lasers.

      "We're promoting Roswell and the biggest mystery of the millennium," said
      Watters, who would otherwise be selling a charming farming community.

      Costantini produced the show, which had a Seattle connection with music
      from Jimi Hendrix, more specifically from a cut called "And The Gods Made
      Life."

      "It's so appropriate," Costantini said. "Amazing stuff, so spacy."

      Picture taking a left turn off of Highway 26 anywhere between Royal City
      and Othello and you'll get an idea of what last night's site looked like.

      The difference is that in Eastern Washington you will never see a 25-foot
      inflatable alien waving with his (hers? its?) three-fingered yellow hand to
      passers-by.

      Like everything else, the alien was sponsored, wearing a sign from Roswell
      Toyota.

      By 11 o'clock last night, the curious assembled at the corner of
      dysfunction junction and lunatic fringe, 20 miles west of town. Reporters
      were here from Time and Newsweek magazines and Fox News.

      The lasers radiated from a 180-foot cavern where a missile was once poised
      for destruction overseas.

      Theoretically, the light will travel endlessly, relaying messages to other
      life forms in the universe.

      "We're capturing a piece of immortality," Costantini said.

      "If they have the equipment to receive that, they will know the signals are
      intelligent. We're hoping to find out."�

      **

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