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Crick: life on Earth started by aliens?

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  • Roger Anderton
    Below is an article from Daily Mail dealing with the death of Francis Crick, co-discoverer of DNA; it briefly mentions his idea that life on Earth was started
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2004
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      Below is an article from Daily Mail dealing with the death of Francis Crick, co-discoverer of DNA; it briefly mentions his idea that life on Earth was started by an alien civilisation -----



      Death of the genius who discovered the secret of life, by Michael Hanlon, science editor. Daily Mail July 30, 2004



      THE most earth-shattering scientific revolution of the 20th Century began with perhaps the greatest ever exercise in statement.

      'We wish to suggest a structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA),' the two authors of the ground-breaking work announced in the journal Nature.

      'This structure has novel features which are of considerable biological interest.'

      In those two arcane sentences were contained the basis of the whole Brave New World - genetics, cloning, GM technology and the rest.

      One of the authors was a young Englishman called Francis Crick and in the spring of 1953, what he and his colleague James Watson had discovered was the key to life itself.

      Thanks to him, we live in a world of forensic genetics, DNA fingerprinting, designer babies and paternity-testing.

      With the announcement yesterday of Professor Crick's death at the age of 88, after a long battle with cancer, the world has lost one of its geniuses.

      He was one of those rare, great Englishmen, like Charles Darwin, who change the way we perceive the world.

      Born in 1916 in Northamptonshire, Crick was fascinated by chemistry as a boy, and alarmed his parents by trying to develop new artificial materials in his bedroom and the kitchen -often with explosive results.

      He spent World War II working on the development and detection of mines and torpedoes.

      In 1947, Crick took up a post at Cambridge, working at the Cavendish Laboratory where he became friends with 23-year-old Watson. The two men worked long into the night on a problem that had been at the heart of biology for more than a century.

      Scientists knew that there had to be some mechanism by which certain characteristics could be transferred from parent to off- spring down the generations -hair and eye colour, height and build for example, as well as IQ and sexuality.

      These 'particles' of inheritance were named genes but no one knew what they actually were.

      By the 1930s, biologists had some good candidates. Genes had to be made of complex chemicals present in every animal, plant and microbe and so proteins were an early contender.

      They are large molecules composed of thousands of atoms -certainly complicated enough to be the home of the genetic code, the collection of the thousands of genes needed to build our bodies.

      Another candidate were nucleic acids. These chemicals were complex and present in nearly all cells of living organisms.

      By 1950, biologists had concluded that the genetic code was indeed contained in these strange molecules but had no clue how it was constructed.

      Crick and Watson turned their attention to one nucleic acid in particular, DNA.

      Using X-ray images of the molecule, they discovered that it was made of two spirals of atoms, intertwined as a double-helix. By deducing its structure - and establishing that genes were simply sections of the DNA molecule - they were able to establish how certain characteristics are passed down the generations.

      In simple terms, during fertilisation the DNA in human eggs and sperm cells 'unzips' down its double helix length allowing the mixing of genes from male and female - and the inheritance of characteristics across generations. In 1962 Crick, Watson and their colleague Maurice Wilkins were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for discovering the 'molecule of life'.

      Crick, who married twice and had three children, spent the rest of his professional life working out the relationship between the genetic code and proteins - the building blocks of our bodies.

      In 1976 he moved to California, focusing in later years on the workings of the brain.

      Brilliant as he was, Crick was sometimes controversial. In the 1980s he suggested that life on Earth may have been started deliberately by an alien civilisation.

      In recent years, he and Watson have also been accused of downplaying the contribution of their co-researcher Rosalind Franklin, who had performed much of the pioneering work with X-rays and DNA. Nevertheless, the key insight - the double helix - was entirely theirs.

      Crick's legacy consists of some of the greatest opportunities -and greatest fears - of the modern world. For better or worse, genetic science has changed the way we think - about our bodies and about our behaviour.

      When he finally had his eureka moment in February 1953, Crick burst into the Eagle Pub in Cambridge announcing that he and Watson 'had found the secret of life'. Indeed, he had.

















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Ocame
      Now, this is a topic worthy of discussion. Highly interesting. For further information, you might want to check out: Cosmic Ancestry: Life comes from space
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2004
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        Now, this is a topic worthy of discussion. Highly interesting. For further information, you might want to check out:
        Cosmic Ancestry: Life comes from space because life comes from life
        http://panspermia.org/

        Roger Anderton <R.J.Anderton@...> wrote:






        Below is an article from Daily Mail dealing with the death of Francis Crick, co-discoverer of DNA; it briefly mentions his idea that life on Earth was started by an alien civilisation -----



        Death of the genius who discovered the secret of life, by Michael Hanlon, science editor. Daily Mail July 30, 2004



        THE most earth-shattering scientific revolution of the 20th Century began with perhaps the greatest ever exercise in statement.

        'We wish to suggest a structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA),' the two authors of the ground-breaking work announced in the journal Nature.

        'This structure has novel features which are of considerable biological interest.'

        In those two arcane sentences were contained the basis of the whole Brave New World - genetics, cloning, GM technology and the rest.

        One of the authors was a young Englishman called Francis Crick and in the spring of 1953, what he and his colleague James Watson had discovered was the key to life itself.

        Thanks to him, we live in a world of forensic genetics, DNA fingerprinting, designer babies and paternity-testing.

        With the announcement yesterday of Professor Crick's death at the age of 88, after a long battle with cancer, the world has lost one of its geniuses.

        He was one of those rare, great Englishmen, like Charles Darwin, who change the way we perceive the world.

        Born in 1916 in Northamptonshire, Crick was fascinated by chemistry as a boy, and alarmed his parents by trying to develop new artificial materials in his bedroom and the kitchen -often with explosive results.

        He spent World War II working on the development and detection of mines and torpedoes.

        In 1947, Crick took up a post at Cambridge, working at the Cavendish Laboratory where he became friends with 23-year-old Watson. The two men worked long into the night on a problem that had been at the heart of biology for more than a century.

        Scientists knew that there had to be some mechanism by which certain characteristics could be transferred from parent to off- spring down the generations -hair and eye colour, height and build for example, as well as IQ and sexuality.

        These 'particles' of inheritance were named genes but no one knew what they actually were.

        By the 1930s, biologists had some good candidates. Genes had to be made of complex chemicals present in every animal, plant and microbe and so proteins were an early contender.

        They are large molecules composed of thousands of atoms -certainly complicated enough to be the home of the genetic code, the collection of the thousands of genes needed to build our bodies.

        Another candidate were nucleic acids. These chemicals were complex and present in nearly all cells of living organisms.

        By 1950, biologists had concluded that the genetic code was indeed contained in these strange molecules but had no clue how it was constructed.

        Crick and Watson turned their attention to one nucleic acid in particular, DNA.

        Using X-ray images of the molecule, they discovered that it was made of two spirals of atoms, intertwined as a double-helix. By deducing its structure - and establishing that genes were simply sections of the DNA molecule - they were able to establish how certain characteristics are passed down the generations.

        In simple terms, during fertilisation the DNA in human eggs and sperm cells 'unzips' down its double helix length allowing the mixing of genes from male and female - and the inheritance of characteristics across generations. In 1962 Crick, Watson and their colleague Maurice Wilkins were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for discovering the 'molecule of life'.

        Crick, who married twice and had three children, spent the rest of his professional life working out the relationship between the genetic code and proteins - the building blocks of our bodies.

        In 1976 he moved to California, focusing in later years on the workings of the brain.

        Brilliant as he was, Crick was sometimes controversial. In the 1980s he suggested that life on Earth may have been started deliberately by an alien civilisation.

        In recent years, he and Watson have also been accused of downplaying the contribution of their co-researcher Rosalind Franklin, who had performed much of the pioneering work with X-rays and DNA. Nevertheless, the key insight - the double helix - was entirely theirs.

        Crick's legacy consists of some of the greatest opportunities -and greatest fears - of the modern world. For better or worse, genetic science has changed the way we think - about our bodies and about our behaviour.

        When he finally had his eureka moment in February 1953, Crick burst into the Eagle Pub in Cambridge announcing that he and Watson 'had found the secret of life'. Indeed, he had.

















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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        Dave Ocame, N1YVV

        East Shore Park Observatory
        FN31ng
        -72.53856 longitude
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Roger Anderton
        Dear David, Glad you are interested. I have a very important piece of this jigsaw. The question of life is tied to Einstein s Unified/unitary Field Theory. The
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 1, 2004
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          Dear David,

          Glad you are interested. I have a very important piece of this jigsaw.

          The question of life is tied to Einstein's Unified/unitary Field Theory.

          The main thread of the History of Einstein's Unified Field Theory is:

          Boscovich - > Einstein- > Whyte - > Baranski (Gap; as it was forgotten
          about after Baranski's premature death, now being picked up by) -> Watson

          Professor Baranski proved the existence of Alien Life by experiment, before
          his death in 1970.
          (And also believed to have developed a method of protecting astronuats from
          space radiation etc.)



          www.einsteinconspiracy.co.uk

          The relevant paper trail I am now posting on
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/unitaryscience
          unitaryscience@yahoogroups.com


          Its a forgotten thread of Physics History that ties into Ancient wisdom.

          I am trying to get this information out to a wider audience.




          Best wishes
          Roger







          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "David Ocame" <docame@...>
          To: <ufonet@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, August 01, 2004 9:20 PM
          Subject: Re: [UFOnet] Crick: life on Earth started by aliens?


          > Now, this is a topic worthy of discussion. Highly interesting. For further
          information, you might want to check out:
          > Cosmic Ancestry: Life comes from space because life comes from life
          > http://panspermia.org/
          >
          > Roger Anderton <R.J.Anderton@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Below is an article from Daily Mail dealing with the death of Francis
          Crick, co-discoverer of DNA; it briefly mentions his idea that life on Earth
          was started by an alien civilisation -----
          >
          >
          >
          > Death of the genius who discovered the secret of life, by Michael Hanlon,
          science editor. Daily Mail July 30, 2004
          >
          >
          >
          > THE most earth-shattering scientific revolution of the 20th Century began
          with perhaps the greatest ever exercise in statement.
          >
          > 'We wish to suggest a structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid
          (DNA),' the two authors of the ground-breaking work announced in the journal
          Nature.
          >
          > 'This structure has novel features which are of considerable biological
          interest.'
          >
          > In those two arcane sentences were contained the basis of the whole Brave
          New World - genetics, cloning, GM technology and the rest.
          >
          > One of the authors was a young Englishman called Francis Crick and in the
          spring of 1953, what he and his colleague James Watson had discovered was
          the key to life itself.
          >
          > Thanks to him, we live in a world of forensic genetics, DNA
          fingerprinting, designer babies and paternity-testing.
          >
          > With the announcement yesterday of Professor Crick's death at the age of
          88, after a long battle with cancer, the world has lost one of its geniuses.
          >
          > He was one of those rare, great Englishmen, like Charles Darwin, who
          change the way we perceive the world.
          >
          > Born in 1916 in Northamptonshire, Crick was fascinated by chemistry as a
          boy, and alarmed his parents by trying to develop new artificial materials
          in his bedroom and the kitchen -often with explosive results.
          >
          > He spent World War II working on the development and detection of mines
          and torpedoes.
          >
          > In 1947, Crick took up a post at Cambridge, working at the Cavendish
          Laboratory where he became friends with 23-year-old Watson. The two men
          worked long into the night on a problem that had been at the heart of
          biology for more than a century.
          >
          > Scientists knew that there had to be some mechanism by which certain
          characteristics could be transferred from parent to off- spring down the
          generations -hair and eye colour, height and build for example, as well as
          IQ and sexuality.
          >
          > These 'particles' of inheritance were named genes but no one knew what
          they actually were.
          >
          > By the 1930s, biologists had some good candidates. Genes had to be made of
          complex chemicals present in every animal, plant and microbe and so proteins
          were an early contender.
          >
          > They are large molecules composed of thousands of atoms -certainly
          complicated enough to be the home of the genetic code, the collection of the
          thousands of genes needed to build our bodies.
          >
          > Another candidate were nucleic acids. These chemicals were complex and
          present in nearly all cells of living organisms.
          >
          > By 1950, biologists had concluded that the genetic code was indeed
          contained in these strange molecules but had no clue how it was constructed.
          >
          > Crick and Watson turned their attention to one nucleic acid in particular,
          DNA.
          >
          > Using X-ray images of the molecule, they discovered that it was made of
          two spirals of atoms, intertwined as a double-helix. By deducing its
          structure - and establishing that genes were simply sections of the DNA
          molecule - they were able to establish how certain characteristics are
          passed down the generations.
          >
          > In simple terms, during fertilisation the DNA in human eggs and sperm
          cells 'unzips' down its double helix length allowing the mixing of genes
          from male and female - and the inheritance of characteristics across
          generations. In 1962 Crick, Watson and their colleague Maurice Wilkins were
          awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for discovering the 'molecule of life'.
          >
          > Crick, who married twice and had three children, spent the rest of his
          professional life working out the relationship between the genetic code and
          proteins - the building blocks of our bodies.
          >
          > In 1976 he moved to California, focusing in later years on the workings of
          the brain.
          >
          > Brilliant as he was, Crick was sometimes controversial. In the 1980s he
          suggested that life on Earth may have been started deliberately by an alien
          civilisation.
          >
          > In recent years, he and Watson have also been accused of downplaying the
          contribution of their co-researcher Rosalind Franklin, who had performed
          much of the pioneering work with X-rays and DNA. Nevertheless, the key
          insight - the double helix - was entirely theirs.
          >
          > Crick's legacy consists of some of the greatest opportunities -and
          greatest fears - of the modern world. For better or worse, genetic science
          has changed the way we think - about our bodies and about our behaviour.
          >
          > When he finally had his eureka moment in February 1953, Crick burst into
          the Eagle Pub in Cambridge announcing that he and Watson 'had found the
          secret of life'. Indeed, he had.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > UFOnet is an international news and discussion list dedicated to:
          > UFOs, UAP, Anomalous Phenomena in general and the Paranormal.
          >
          > To subscribe, send a blank e-mail message to:
          > ufonet-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > To unsubscribe, send a blank e-mail message to:
          > ufonet-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Website (Dutch only): http://www.ufonet.nl/
          > Messages to the list-owner: ufonet-admin@...
          >
          > Caution, many reports of unidentified phenomena posted to this list
          require
          > further investigation.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          > To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ufonet/
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > ufonet-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
          >
          >
          >
          > ***********************************
          > ***********************************
          >
          > Dave Ocame, N1YVV
          >
          > East Shore Park Observatory
          > FN31ng
          > -72.53856 longitude
          > 41.16797 latitude
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > UFOnet is an international news and discussion list dedicated to:
          > UFOs, UAP, Anomalous Phenomena in general and the Paranormal.
          >
          > To subscribe, send a blank e-mail message to:
          > ufonet-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > To unsubscribe, send a blank e-mail message to:
          > ufonet-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Website (Dutch only): http://www.ufonet.nl/
          > Messages to the list-owner: ufonet-admin@...
          >
          > Caution, many reports of unidentified phenomena posted to this list
          require
          > further investigation.
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
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          >
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