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Fwd = (meteorobs): Schoolboy's Fireball Photo Amazes NASA

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  • Frits Westra
    Forwarded by: fwestra@hetnet.nl (Frits Westra) Originally from: owner-meteorobs-digest@atmob.org (meteorobs-digest) Original Subject: meteorobs-digest V4
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 2, 2003
      Forwarded by: fwestra@... (Frits Westra)
      Originally from: owner-meteorobs-digest@... (meteorobs-digest)
      Original Subject: meteorobs-digest V4 #1237
      Original Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2003 11:22:23 -0400 (EDT)

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      Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 10:40:24 -0700 (PDT)
      From: Robert Verish <bolidechaser@...>
      Subject: (meteorobs) FW: Schoolboy's Fireball Photo Amazes NASA

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      [meteorite-list] Schoolboy's Fireball Photo Amazes NASA
      Ron Baalke baalke@...
      Wed, 1 Oct 2003 10:23:23 -0700 (PDT)


      http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/wales/south_east/3155928.stm

      Schoolboy's photo amazes Nasa
      BBC News
      October 1, 2003

      A schoolboy has impressed experts at American
      space agency Nasa after capturing a rare picture
      of a meteor burning out above his home town in
      south Wales.

      Jonathan Burnett, 15, was taking snaps of his
      friends performing skateboarding stunts near his
      home in Pencoed near Bridgend when a bright light
      in the sky caught his attention.

      He took two photographs of the fiery ball before it
      burned out and rushed home to show his parents.

      Later, he emailed the picture to Nasa asking for an
      explanation and was amazed to discover that the
      space experts were so impressed with his snap they
      had published it on their website.

      His father Paul explained: "He has a digital camera
      and was out taking some pictures of his friends on
      the street.

      "A little boy ran over and shouted 'look the sun has
      exploded' and Jonathan turned around and
      managed to take two pictures of it.

      "None of us knew what it was and we thought that
      maybe it was a plane that had exploded.

      "We were really keen to find out what it was, and so
      without us realising it, Jonathan had emailed the
      picture to experts at Nasa to ask for an explanation.

      "The next thing we knew that they had used the
      picture on their website" he said.

      Jonathan, who attends Pencoed Comprehensive
      School, said: "It was such a coincidence that we
      happened to be in the street at the time.

      "I was trying out my new camera to take pictures of
      my friend who was doing a skateboarding trick.

      "I took the first picture and then about
      two minutes later I took the second one
      before it burned out.

      "One of our first thoughts was that it was
      the sun reflecting off the clouds.

      "Everyone in school is amazed - most of
      my friends believe me but there are some
      who said they don't believe me.

      "I am really interested in photography -
      but I don't think I will ever manage to
      take another picture like that," he added.

      On its website Nasa described the
      teenager's picture as a "sofa-sized rock
      came hurtling into the nearby atmosphere of
      planet Earth and disintegrated".

      "By diverting his camera, he was able to
      document this rare sky event and capture one
      of the more spectacular meteor images yet
      recorded. Roughly one minute later, he took
      another picture of the dispersing meteor trial.

      Bright fireballs occur over someplace on Earth
      nearly every day.

      "A separate bolide, likely even more dramatic,
      struck India only a few days ago."

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